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Gregory Abbott – Shake You Down

Gregory Abbott,

(born April 2, 1954 New York City, New York) is an American soul musician (keyboards and drums), singer, composer and producer.
Abbott’s parents came from Venezuela and Antigua. He is a dual citizen of the U.S. and Antigua. During his early years, Abbott’s mother taught him how to play piano and encouraged him to develop vocally.

gregory abbott

Before his career as musician, Gregory Abbott studied psychology at University of California, Berkeley and creative writing at Stanford; where he won a Wallace Stegner fellowship. Also, he has taught English at University of California, Berkeley.

One of Abbott’s first opportunities in his studio was an album for an independent record label, which gave him the opportunity to do a duet with Whitney Houston. Continuing on, Abbott produced for the group EQ on Atlantic Records.

In 1986, Abbott released his first solo album, Shake You Down. The title track for the album was a success, going platinum and topping the Billboard Hot 100. The album’s second single, “I Got The Feelin (It’s Over)” which reached Number 5 on the R&B chart. With the strength of its singles, the album propelled to platinum status and earned Abbott several awards.

Internationally,Gregory Abbott carried much success, winning first prize at the Tokyo Music Festival. The title track of his second album, “I’ll Prove It To You” which was released in 1988, was featured on a Japanese movie soundtrack. In Belgium, he performed with Princess Stephanie of Monaco.

gregory abbott

Over the years much of his new music has been released via singles on his own Mojo Man Entertainment label.Gregory Abbott has continued with his R&B sound but in addition he has added a Caribbean/Soul feel as well. In 2011, a album entitled “Drop Your Mask” was released; and Abbott continues to release new singles two to four times a year.

Bobby Brown – My Prerogative

Bobby Brown,

Robert Barisford “Bobby” Brown (born February 5, 1969) is an American R&B singer-songwriter, occasional rapper and dancer.

Brown started his career as one of the frontmen of the R&B/pop group New Edition, from its inception as The Bricks in 1982 until his forced exit from the group in 1986 following a period of misbehavior on his part. Starting a solo career, he became a hit success with his second album in 1988, Don’t Be Cruel, which spawned a number of hit singles including the co-self penned “My Prerogative”, which became his signature hit. Brown had a string of top ten hits on various Billboard charts between 1986 and 1993 and is a recipient of a Grammy Award. Brown is noted as a pioneer of new jack swing, a fusion of R&B and hip hop. Brown has also won American Music Awards and Soul Train Awards.

Brown was most noted in recent years as the ex-husband of late pop singer Whitney Houston. Brown and Houston later gained notoriety co-starring in the reality show Being Bobby Brown. He has a daughter named Bobbi Kristina Houston Brown with her.
Brown was born in Boston as one of eight children to Herbert “Pops” and Carole Brown. Herbert was a construction worker and Carole was a schoolteacher. Brown and his family grew up in Roxbury’s Orchard Park Projects. As a child, Brown got involved in petty theft including robbery later saying “I didn’t wanna ask my mother or my father because they didn’t have a lot of money”, stating that whenever he saw something he wanted, “I’d just go to the store and take it.” Brown also grew up around gangs. At ten, he was shot in the knee during a fight with a rival gang while attending a block party. Brown said his life reached a turning point at eleven after seeing one of his friends dead from multiple stab wounds at another party. Brown’s brother Tommy would later say after that moment, Brown took “his career, schooling, his whole life more seriously.” Brown’s first taste of being onstage occurred at the age of three when one of his childhood idols, James Brown, performed in Boston. This performance had sparked a dream of becoming a singer. Brown joined the church choir, where he recognized his own singing abilities.

bobby brownMusic career
New Edition

New Edition was originally started by nine-year-old Brown and childhood friends Michael Bivins, Ricky Bell, Travis Pettus & Corey Rackley who all knew each other growing up in the Orchard Park Projects in Boston. Rackley however left the group early and good friend Ralph Tresvant joined the group at the suggestion of Bell who sang with Tresvant as a duo . Brown was also familiar with Tresvant since they were kids. Travis Pettus would also leave the group and they became a quartet of Bell, Tresvant, Bivins, and Brown. In 1982 they became a quintet when their manager Brooke Payne insisted on bringing in his nephew Ronnie DeVoe, to complete the group. After performing in several talent shows in the Boston areas in 1982, they won a deal with Maurice Starr’s label and released their debut album, Candy Girl. The title track became an instant million-seller in which Brown sung co-lead alongside Bell and Tresvant. Brown’s first full lead vocal performance was on the New Edition ballad, “Jealous Girl”, which was a minor hit when it charted in 1983. The group became pop sensations with their self-titled sophomore release. The album included the crossover hits “Cool It Now” and “Mr. Telephone Man”, which Brown also co-led.

Despite the group’s success, however, Brown felt the group was never rightfully paid the money they felt they had earned from their success, later saying “the most I saw from all the tours and all of the records we sold was $500 and a VCR.” Brown also allegedly grew jealous of the attention given to fellow New Edition member Ralph Tresvant and during some of their tour performances, would often step out of his position and perform out of turn, performing seductively and singing, which caused hiccups from the group’s management team. Brown was featured on two more New Edition albums before leaving the group in early 1986.[1] Brown later said he felt that the group’s management treated them “like little slaves by people who were only interested in money and power, and not in the welfare of New Edition.” A little controversy arose over how Brown got kicked out. Some say Brown asked to be let out of New Edition but a VH-1 Behind the Music documentary on the group claimed Brown was voted out by the group via their management team, with some of the members, most prominently Tresvant, against the decision.
Solo career

Following his exit, Brown signed a contract with his former group’s label, MCA, which had earlier promised Brown a solo deal if he had decided to leave New Edition and also signed with manager Steven Machat, who also worked with New Edition. The label released his debut album, King of Stage, in 1986. Brown had a number-one R&B hit with the ballad, “Girlfriend” but the album didn’t do well.

Brown laid low for more than a year working on his follow-up album. With the help of Machat and an MCA representative, Louil Silas, Brown began working with some of the top R&B producers and songwriters including Babyface, Antonio “L.A.” Reid and Teddy Riley. The producers helped to compose what became Brown’s most successful solo album to date, Don’t Be Cruel. Released in 1988, the album launched five top ten hits on the Billboard Hot 100 including the number-one single, the self-penned “My Prerogative”, which became, along with “Every Little Step” and the title track, signature hits for the performer. After topping both the pop and R&B charts, album sales eventually would reach twelve million copies worldwide making it the best-selling album of 1989.

In 1989, Brown contributed two songs to the soundtrack of Ghostbusters II, in which he also appeared in a cameo role in the film. The leading track from the soundtrack “On Our Own”, became another top ten single for the singer, peaking at number two. The same year, a remix compilation, Dance! Ya Know It, was released and found fans in the United Kingdom, where Brown had a fan base and had major success. Brown ventured on a 120-day world tour to promote the Don’t Be Cruel project in 1988. The tour became a success with Brown’s former group New Edition sometimes opening for him. The tour lasted into spring 1991 but not without Brown gaining notoriety for simulating sexual acts onstage, which got him in trouble with the law. In 1990 Bobby performed Tap Into My Heart at the 1990 MTV Awards and Brown was supposed to release the album Mystical Magic but it was shelved for unknown reasons and never saw the light of day. Brown stayed busy and in 1991 he collaborated with New Edition member and friend Ralph Tresvant in the song “Stone Cold Gentleman” which was a top 5 R&B hit and also hop on the remix to Babyface song “Tender Lover” that same year.

bobby brown

Brown’s next album, the Bobby album wouldn’t come until 1992. While released during the final days of the new jack swing era, an era that Brown had dominated, the album did become a success, selling more than 2 million copies and spawning several hits including “Humpin’ Around”, “Get Away” and “Good Enough”. However the sales of Bobby didn’t match its predecessor. Some of that may have to do with Brown deciding not to continue his career as he was now married to his famous wife, Whitney Houston, who with Brown, contributed a UK hit with their duet, “Something in Common”, from the Bobby album. Brown would release his fourth solo album, Forever, in 1997. Due to lack of promotion and Brown’s desire to write and produce most of the tracks, the album tanked and the album’s only single, “Feeling Inside”, was not successful.

Prior to its release, Brown had been in negotiations with rapper Tupac Shakur to get signed to Shakur’s new label Makaveli Records. However, Shakur died before that would take place. Leaving MCA following the release of Forever, Brown laid low for several years, re-emerging in 2002 where he was featured in a duet with rapper Ja Rule on the song “Thug Lovin'”. Brown had been signed to Murder Inc. Records. However much like the situation with 2Pac, Murder Inc. began dissolving, leading to Brown’s tenure with them brief. In 2006, Brown appeared adding vocals to Damian Marley’s song “Beautiful” on Marley’s album, Welcome to Jamrock. In 2010, Brown was featured in a duet with singer Macy Gray on the song “Real Love” off Gray’s The Sellout. Gray explained to Essence[2] about the project, saying “actually he came to the studio, since he doesn’t live far, and knocked out his recording in two hours. We’re friends and his one-year-old son is my godson. His fiancée is one of my best friends in the whole world. I met Bobby a long time ago, but we really got to know each other through her.”[3]

On June 5, 2012, Brown released his fifth album, The Masterpiece. The album debuted at #41 on the R&B album chart. and another song Plenty Of Bottles Going Down featuring Ralph Tresvant on Real Hubands Of Hollywood.
New Edition reunions

Brown made his first reunited appearance with New Edition at the 1990 MTV Video Music Awards. Their performance later sparked the recording of Bell Biv DeVoe’s “Word to the Mutha!” in 1991 which Brown, Ralph Tresvant and later NE member Johnny Gill was included. A full-fledged reunion occurred with the 1996 release of the album, Home Again. Brown contributed lead vocals on two hit singles, “Hit Me Off” and “You Don’t Have to Worry”. However a subsequent 1997 tour to support the album led to problems between Brown and the other New Edition members. Brown later admitted that he was struggling with drug addiction and alcoholism during the tour.

In 2005, at the BET 25th anniversary special, Brown again reunited with New Edition to a receptive audience. In 2008, Brown, Ralph Tresvant and Johnny Gill then formed a splinter group, Heads of State, to compete with Bell Biv DeVoe. At the 2009 BET Awards, following the death of the group’s idol Michael Jackson, the six New Edition members again reunited to perform a medley of Jackson 5 hits in honor of Jackson. This sparked rumors of another full-fledged New Edition reunion, which was confirmed the following year. As of 2014, Brown and New Edition continue to perform together.
Influences

Bobby Brown’s musical influences spark from artists such as Rick James, Michael Jackson, Marvin Gaye, and Prince.[4] Brown can be heard emulating grunts and “Ow’s” made popular by James Brown as well as Michael Jackson.

bobby brown
Film and television career

Brown made his first acting debut making a guest appearance in the 1989 film, Ghostbusters II, playing the Mayor’s Doorman. The following year, he appeared in the HBO kids show, Mother Goose Rock ‘n’ Rhyme playing all three characters of Three Blind Mice. In 1995, he made another guest appearance in the film, Panther, and had a major role the following year on the Martin Lawrence film, A Thin Line Between Love and Hate. Brown made other guest appearances in the films, Two Can Play That Game, Gang of Roses, Nora’s Hair Salon and Go for Broke.

In 2005, Brown signed a deal with Bravo to overlook the direction of the reality series, Being Bobby Brown, but it was said that he had to convince producers that his then-wife Whitney Houston would appear on the show. Houston later told Oprah Winfrey that she agreed to do it because she “loved him” and “did whatever he asked because I was his wife.” The show lasted one season but received bad reviews in the duration of its run, leading to a fallout in both singers’ careers. The show ended in 2006 after Houston refused to appear in a second season of the show. The couple divorced soon after.

In June 2007, Bobby Brown took part in the ITV television series “24 hours with…”, a chat show format as celebrity and interviewer spend an intense 24 hours locked in a room together. The show’s host, Jamie Campbell, asked Brown questions about his career and private life, and infamously joked about making “sexual moves” towards the singer. Bobby Brown was furious and threatened to beat Campbell up live on air.Brown’s later tenures in reality shows included appearances on Real Husbands of Hollywood, Celebrity Fit Club and Gone Country.

Johnny Kemp – Just Got Paid

 

Johnny Kemp,

(born August 2, 1959) is a Bahamian singer. He began singing in nightclubs in the Bahamas at 13. He moved to New York in 1979 with the band “Kinky Fox.” His self-titled debut album came out in 1986 and he scored a minor hit with “Just Another Lover.” True success came the following year, however, with the release of his Secrets of Flying album, which contained a pair of Top 5 hits on the US Billboard R&B chart: “Dancin’ with Myself” and “Just Got Paid,” the latter hitting #1. “Just Got Paid” also cracked the Top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1988, and went to top the Hot Dance Music/Club Play. It provided his only UK Singles Chart entry, peaking at #68 for one week in August 1988. His only other Hot 100 entry was “Birthday Suit,” a tune from the soundtrack to the movie, Sing which climbed to #36 in 1989.

johnny kemp

Johnny Kemp appeared on the 2007 DVD release by Keith Sweat entitled Sweat Hotel Live. This DVD featured live performances by Sweat in a sort of reunion with other R&B/new jack swing era pioneers of the late 1980s, including Teddy Riley. Johnny Kemp appeared on the final track, an “all-star finale” rendition of “Just Got Paid,” originally recorded at a February 2006 concert in Atlanta, Georgia. Incidentally, Sweat had initially passed on the instrumental track that would eventually become “Just Got Paid,” when it was first offered to him in the mid-1980s. Kemp listened to it, added his own lyrics to the melody, and “Just Got Paid” was born.

Kemp was the featured performer (singing “Just Got Paid“) at the NJS4E event in New York on September 8, 2007. As the name implied, the show celebrated and commemorated 20 years of new jack swing, and took place at Ashford & Simpson‘s Sugar Bar.

Johnny Kemp is married and the father of two sons.

johnny kemp

 

 

Pebbles – Girlfriend

 Pebbles

Perri Reid (born Perri Arlette McKissack), best known by her former stage name, Pebbles, is an American dance-pop and urban contemporary singersongwriter.

She created the contemporary R&B group TLC. She is currently an Atlanta-based minister named Sister Perri.

Early life

Reid was born Perri Arnette McKissack on August 29, 1964. Pebbles is one of four children. Her divorced mother raised her family on the income of a waitress and housekeeper.

By age 16, a local musician gave her a production deal which fell through several months later when she got pregnant with her daughter, Ashley. Perri married the father. The marriage lasted one year.

Perri got her start in 1981 as a backing vocalist for the percussionist/band leader Bill Summers and the funk band Con Funk Shun. Reid co-wrote one of Con Funk Shun’s singles, “Body Lovers”.

While working at an Oakland, California real estate office she met contractor George L. Smith. Smith bankrolled Perri with $80,000 for a demo tape and video for “Mercedes Boy“. The demo and video led to a contract with MCA. Smith and Perri married in 1985 and made their home in San Francisco.

Pebbles recorded several hit singles on her own during the late 1980s and early 1990s (including “Girlfriend” and “Mercedes Boy“). She also sang background vocals on Paula Abdul‘s album Forever Your Girl in 1988.

Pebbitone and TLC

In July 1989 Perri married L.A. Reid. She formed the Atlanta-based production company Pebbitone and founded her own record label, Savvy Records.

Pebbitone managed TLC, which was signed with LaFace Records, L.A. Reid’s record label. When TLC filed for bankruptcy in 1995, claiming Pebbles had mismanaged their funds, the ensuing conflict damaged Pebbles’ marriage. She divorced Reid, and Pebbitone sued LaFace for $10 million.

pebblesReligious conversion

In 1997, Pebbles underwent a religious conversion. Under her new stage name “Sister Perri”, she founded Women of God Changing Lives (WOGCL) Ministries. As an ordained minister, she now preaches and ministers through song  In 2008, after a thirteen-year music hiatus, Reid released her fourth album and debut gospel album, Prophetic Flows Vol I & II, which peaked at #12 on the Billboard Gospel Album Chart.

In February 2011, Perri was named the executive producer/host of Essence‘s national R&B search.

Personal life

In 2000 she married former MLB player Otis Nixon  They divorced in 2004. She married Excel Sharieff in 2010.

Pebbles.

 

Rene & Angela – I’ll Be Good

René & Angela

were a duo consisting of artist/producers René Moore and Angela Winbush. The group dissolved by the mid-1980s. Both went on to successful solo careers as performers, songwriter, and producers of RB (R & B music). Moore later went on to form Multi-Media Communications, which operated radio stations from 2008 to 2012. Winbush went on to score five top ten R&B hits as a solo artist.

 

rene-angela

Rene & Angela   I’ll Be Good – partial live performance.

Cheryl Lynn – ” Got To Be Real ” – live

Cheryl Lynn

Lynda Cheryl Smith-Sunset (born March 11, 1957), known better by her professional name Cheryl Lynn, is an American disco, R&B and soul singer known best for her 1978 disco song, “Got to Be Real”.
Lynn’s singing career began when she was a young girl with her church choir. However, her professional singing career started during 1976 when she obtained a job as a backing vocalist for the national touring company of the musical drama The Wiz. Eventually she would obtain the role of Evillene, the Wicked Witch of the West, during the six month national tour.

Prior to her appearance on The Wiz, Cheryl taped an episode of the Gong Show during the early part of 1976. She scored a perfect 30 singing Joe Cocker’s “You Are So Beautiful”, a previous act (a singing juggler) had also scored 30 and in the audience applause tie-break the juggler was deemed the winner. After the episode was broadcast, during the autumn of 1976, record industry executives were calling to contract her.
Success and later career

After her performance on The Gong Show, Ahmed Ertegun of Atlantic Records company couldn’t come to an initial meeting with Lynn, with the result that she was contracted with Columbia Records company. Lynn released her first and best-known song, “Got to Be Real,” which was composed by keyboardist David Paich (of the band Toto), David Foster and Lynn. The song scored #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 record chart and #1 on the Rhythm & Blues chart. The success of the single album prompted a full scale debut album. Named Cheryl Lynn, it was produced by Paich. The album sold more than a million copies and scored #5 on Billboard magazine ’​s R&B albums chart and #23 on Billboard’s top 200 album charts. The next single off the album, written by Judy Wieder and John Footman, “Star Love”‘, also became a #1 success.

Wieder and Footman joined songwriting forces with the artist for her second album, In Love (album) with “Got Just What You Need!”

During this time, members of the rock music group Toto were producing their debut album. During the production Lynn was asked to provide the female backing vocal for the single album, “Georgy Porgy,”. The single scored #48 on Billboard’s popular music charts. Although Toto would go on to chart more than a dozen popular music successes throughout the years, it was Lynn’s vocal for “Georgy Porgy” that aided the group in charting their only R&B (#18) and Dance (#80) on the Billboard charts.

 

cheryl-lynn-2

During 1981, Ray Parker, Jr. produced “Shake It Up Tonight”, a major dance & R&B success from Lynn’s third album, In the Night. The next year, Luther Vandross was asked to produced Lynn’s fourth album, Instant Love. The 2nd single from the album, “If This World Were Mine” – a 1982 duet with Luther Vandross that cover-versioned a Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell song, has become a classic. For her fifth album, Preppie, Lynn produced most of the tracks with the exception of the single “Encore” (#1 R&B ) – which was written and produced by the Minneapolis funk music duo, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis. It became Lynn’s second #1 single . During 1989, Lynn released the top 10 single, “Every Time I Try To Say Goodbye”, from her eighth album, Whatever It Takes.
The 1990s

Lynn began the 1990s without a record contract. She did mostly session work for Richard Marx albums, Rush Street and Paid Vacation as well as Luther Vandross’ Your Secret Love album. But during 1995, after a six year hiatus from recording her own material, Lynn teamed with producer/songwriter Teddy Riley, (formerly of the New Jack Swing music group Guy), to record her Ninth album, Good Time. It was released in Japan, the United Kingdom and later in the United States as an imported CD and featured the nightclub favorite single album “Guarantee For My Heart”. During 1996, Sony Records/Legacy released Got to Be Real – The Best Of Cheryl Lynn, which included Lynn’s most successful recordings from her years with Columbia Records. This was followed soon by another compilation CD named, The Real Thing, which featured other recordings from Lynn’s first six albums. Two years later she performed on HBO’s Sinbad’s Summer Soul Jam 4 (1998), hosted by comedian Sinbad.
2000 to present

During the new millennium Lynn toured Japan and did an occasional gig in the U.S., performing at charity events in her hometown of Los Angeles. During 2000 she worked with hip-hop musician J Supreme on his single “Your Love (Encore)”, which was an update of her #1 1984 song “Encore.” She performed on ABC’s The Disco Ball…A 30-Year Celebration, which was broadcast during January 2003. During 2004 she recorded the song “Sweet Kind of Life,” which was also written and produced by Jam & Lewis, for the animated film and soundtrack to Shark Tale.

On September 19, 2005, Lynn’s song “Got to Be Real” was inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame. On May 23, 2006 Collectables Record Label re-released her 1981 album In The Night and 1982’s Instant Love, in twin CD package form. It was the first time ever that either album was released as a CD in the U.S.

Cheryl Lynn is considered an influence on some of today’s R&B female singers, including Mary J. Blige, who, along with Will Smith, covered Lynn’s song (“Got to Be Real”), also for the soundtrack of the animated movie Shark Tale. Japanese popular music singer Kumi Koda cover-versioned the song for her July 2010 single album “Gossip Candy” as well. On 11 April 2010, “Got to Be Real” charted for the first time in the UK, peaking at number 70.

Loose Ends – “Watching You”

Loose Ends

was a successful British R&B band that had several urban contemporary hits. The trio was formed in London in 1980, initially comprising vocalist and guitarist Carl McIntosh, vocalist Jane Eugene, and keyboard player, writer and founder Steve Nichol. The latter two left the group in 1989, bringing an end to the band’s most successful phase.
The group was originally called Loose End, and signed with Virgin Records in 1981. Their debut material was written for them by Chris Amoo and Eddie Amoo, who had achieved UK Singles Chart success of their own in the 1970s, with their group The Real Thing. The trio changed its name to Loose Ends in 1983 and continued to record for Virgin. They were distributed in the United States by MCA Records.

The group was founded by Steve Nichol after he left the London Guildhall School of Music and Drama where he received extensive classical training. Nichol received ‘The Young Musician Of The Year Award’ at the age of just 16 which lead him into great success. Nichol went on to tour with The Jam in 1982 as a Trumpet, Trombone and Keyboard player. He was also a composer for: Rakim, Carl Cox, Phyllis Hyman and other various artists. Most of the band’s material was also written and supplied by Nichol.[citation needed] Nichol auditioned McIntosh at a bar in Central London and found Eugene through a college fashion show.

They achieved their first success with “Hangin’ on a String (Contemplating)” in 1985, which reached #13 in the UK chart.”Hangin’ on a String” also reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard R&B chart, making Loose Ends the first British band ever to top that chart. They reached #16 with the single “Magic Touch” in the same year. The disc was produced in the U.S., as was their 1986 hit “Slow Down” (later used as the theme music for MuchMusic’s Soul in The City program). At this time, they also arranged and played on a number of tracks from Five Star’s debut album including the single “Let Me Be The One” which reached number two in the same listings later in 1986. Subsequent falling sales saw the threesome notch up their final transatlantic hit in 1988 with “Watching You (Watching Me).”

The group’s lineup changed in 1990 due to differences in its proposed musical direction, with Eugene and Nichol wanting to maintain the group’s sound and McIntosh wanting to be more experimental.[citation needed] Eugene and Nichol decided to leave, and were replaced by Linda Carriere and Sunay Suleyman. Look How Long turned out to be the final studio album released under the Loose Ends name, and featured their final hit single, “Don’t Be A Fool” (1990). McIntosh himself went on to work behind the recording desk following the group’s peak popularity, but the new trio soon disbanded. He has since produced several artists’ work, most notably that of Caron Wheeler and Ruth Joy.

loose ends

In 1998, the group reunited to appear on a single by Pete Rock called “Take Your Time.” They also appeared in the music video for the track.

“Hangin’ on a String (Contemplating)” is featured in the popular video game Grand Theft Auto IV’s fictional Soul/R&B radio station The Vibe 98.8.

Carl McIntosh recently appeared at Club1 In Ascot, UK doing a live PA and announced that a new album is being released in 2010. It was the first time in over 10 years that McIntosh had sung live. All three members of the original band, reunited in Los Angeles and Atlanta in 2006. Jane Eugene and Steve Nichols performed together as Loose Ends at the 2006 Essence Music Festival in Houston and 2011 Essence Music Festival in New Orleans. The group continues to perform stateside as “Loose Ends, featuring Jane Eugene,” with Steve Nichols making periodic guest appearances.

Carl McIntosh currently performs under the name ‘Loose Ends Experience’ or ‘Loose Ends’ which is a sound system and features various DJ’s such as Chris ‘Fatboy’ Harvey and a UK soul singer Kyra Simone.

Karyn White – Secret Rendezvous

Karyn White

Karyn Layvonne White (born October 14, 1965) is an American R&B singer who was popular during the late 1980s and early 1990s.
White was born in Los Angeles  to Vivian and Clarence White. She is the youngest of five children. She sang in a church choir and worked as a backing singer, then sang on Jeff Lorber’s 1986 “Private Passion” single “Facts of Love”, “True Confessions” and “Back in Love” before signing to Warner Bros. Records.

Karyn White married Terry Lewis in 1992 and together they had a daughter, Ashley Nicole and adopted son Brandon. Lewis brought to the marriage children Trey and Chloe. They eventually divorced in 1999, and she later married producer/musician Bobby G.
Music career:

White’s self-titled debut album Karyn White was released in 1988. It was produced by L.A. Reid and Babyface and achieved platinum status. Karyn White contained the hit singles “The Way You Love Me”, “Secret Rendezvous” (#6 in the U.S., her biggest hit at the time), “Superwoman” and “Love Saw It” a duet with Babyface. White was nominated in the Best R&B/Urban Contemporary New Artist category for the 1989 Soul Train Music Awards. She was also nominated for two Grammy Awards. She became the first female artist to have their first three solo releases hit #1 on the R&B charts.

karyn white

Her follow-up album was Ritual of Love in 1991. It had songs produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and featured the hit single “Romantic”, which hit number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. Other singles from the album include “The Way I Feel About You” (U.S. #12), “Walkin’ the Dog,” and “Do Unto Me” (the last two did not chart). The photographer and director Matthew Rolston directed the video for the hit single “Romantic”. Michael Walls, who was credited as stylist on Ritual of Love, worked with White on the look for the Ritual of Love album sleeve, and three of the music videos released for the album. Walls had the idea for the Chanel inspired pearls and black dress used on the album cover, the french maid look and multiple wardrobe changes for video of “The Way I Feel About You”, and the “Walkin’ the Dog” video, which was based on a scene from the film Sweet Charity.

Her next album was Make Him Do Right in 1994. The album did not sell well, although she did chart with the singles “Hungah” and the Babyface-penned “Can I Stay With You”, which became her final U.S. R&B Top 10 hit in early 1995. “I’d Rather Be Alone”, her last chart single to date, peaked at #50 on the same chart later that year.

White left Warner Bros. Records in 1999, and dropped out of the music public eye for many years to start a family.
Recent times:

Karyn White resides in Rocklin, California, a suburb of Sacramento, and runs a successful interior design and real estate business. In 2006 she recorded a new album, titled Sista Sista; which was slated for release in 2006, but was shelved. Two tracks, “All I Do” and “Disconnected”, were later released on the best of compilation album, Superwoman: The Best of Karyn White. She was also slated to appear on the Soul Train Music Awards in 2009 as a tribute to Babyface Edmonds. However, this performance was canceled when Edmonds and Reid withdrew from the Soul Train ceremony, declining the honor. White released her first album after a seventeen-year break, Carpe Diem, in March 2012.

Paul Hardcastle and D – Train – Your the one for me – live

D Train

Paul Hardcastle (born 10 December 1957, London, England) is an English composer, musician, and multi-instrumentalist. Although he specializes in the synthesizer, he can also play multiple instruments.
In the early 1980s, Hardcastle played the keyboards on several singles on the Oval record label by the dance music groups Direct Drive and First Light, before going solo.

He achieved some acclaim for his early singles, notably in 1984, the electro-funk/freestyle/instrumental track, “Rain Forest”, which along with the track “Sound Chaser”, hit number two on the dance chart. “Rain Forest” also hit number five on the soul chart and number fifty-seven on the Hot 100. In 1985, he came to greater prominence with the international hit “19”, a song about America’s involvement in the Vietnam War and the effect it had on the soldiers who served, using sampled dialogue from an American television documentary about the post-traumatic stress disorder suffered by veterans. Producer Simon Fuller named his company ’19 Management’ after the song, and the two are known to collaborate.

d trainHardcastle enjoyed several further hits in the UK, including “Don’t Waste My Time” (with vocals by Carol Kenyon) (UK No. 8) and “The Wizard”, a UK No. 15 hit that became the theme tune for BBC Television’s music chart show Top of the Pops from April 1986 until September 1991. He also had a hit with “Just for Money”, which reached No. 19 in the UK and featured Bob Hoskins and Laurence Olivier. Earlier, he had cut a cover version of D-Train’s most influential hit “You’re the One For Me”, segued with his own compositions “Daybreak” and “A.M.” Hardcastle also wrote the theme tune for Saturday Live, a popular entertainment show which ran from 1985–1987.

He also made the hit single “The Voyager”, which was used for the BBC One programme Holiday.

After 1986, Hardcastle started to specialise in television soundtracks and remixed work, for artists as such as Five Star, Barry White, Third World, Sinitta, Johnny Logan, Hiroshima and Ian Dury. His piece “The Shuffle” was included in the soundtrack of the movie When the Wind Blows.

In 1988, Hardcastle released the concept album, No Winners, which focuses on the potential negative effects of the Cold War arms race. In 2000, he released Hardcastle III, which included a remake of “Rain Forest” and a hit single, “Desire”.

Hardcastle has also recorded several synth jazz albums, alternating releases under the pseudonyms Kiss The Sky (with Jaki Graham) and The Jazzmasters, as well as under his real name Paul Hardcastle. Working regularly with vocalists such as Helen Rogers, Becki Biggins and Margo LeDuc, Hardcastle has recruited several saxophonists including Gary Barnacle (on the first album), Snake Davis, Phil Todd, Tony Woods and Rock Hendricks. All these albums have been played on smooth jazz radio in the United States, where some of the most played tracks include “Northern Lights”, “Lost in Space”, “Desire”, “Shine”, and “Serene”. He won the Billboard Smooth Jazz Artist Of The Year award in 2008.

2010’s The Jazzmasters VI track “Touch and Go”, featuring his son Paul Jr. on saxophone, reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Jazz songs chart, becoming his tenth number one on the Smooth Jazz chart in total.

His album, Hardcastle VI, released in September 2011, features yet another remake of “Rain Forest”—this time mixed with R&B legend Marvin Gaye’s signature song, “What’s Going On”.

In February 2014, Hardcastle was appointed Chairman of NUA Entertainment which was founded by one of the UK’s top businessmen, Neil Utley and his wife, Nicky.

D-Train:

James Nelson Williams (born January 21, 1962), known by the moniker D Train, is an American singer, songwriter, instrumentalist, producer and actor. He rose to fame in the early 1980’s with the release of his first album “You’re the One for Me” (working with songwriter/producer Hubert Eaves III initially as a duo), which spawned his first US Billboard Dance chart number-one hit, “You’re the One for Me”. His debut album (under the Prelude Records label) would also chart with the hits “Keep On” and the much covered Burt Bacharach hit “Walk on By”. He would go on to work with Eaves producing hits on the follow-up albums Music and Something’s On Your Mind before the duo disbanded. He then ventured forth as a solo artist, retaining the D Train name and was signed to Columbia Records, producing more hit singles on the albums Miracles of the Heart and In Your Eyes as well as producing additional albums under his own label, including 701 Franklin Ave..

d train

As a songwriter, D Train has written for numerous artists, including Patti Austin, George Duke, Carl Anderson, John P. Key and Vanessa Bell Armstrong. He has lent his voice on songs for artists such as Michael Jackson, Elton John, Carrie Underwood and Mary J. Blige among others as well as numerous television and film soundtracks. He also hosted “The D Train Show” for many years on Sirius XM Radio and has enjoyed great success as one of the leading jingle vocalists in the industry.

D Train has a wide vocal range and his artistic influences include Rock, R&B, Soul, Dance, House, Blues, Gospel, Contemporary Christian Music and Native American Music. His music has been influenced by Nat King Cole, Paul Robeson, The Jackson Five, Tony Bennett, Mario Lanzo, Billy Epstein, Al Green, Bobby Womack, Mel Tormé and Carl Anderson.

 

 

 

 

 

The System – You Are In My System

The System

is an American synthpop duo consisting of vocalist/guitarist Mic Murphy and seasoned session keyboardist David Frank. The band was founded in 1982 in New York and backed up by Paul Pesco on electric guitar and Kris Khellow – keyboards, synthesizers.

Sometimes the group is referred to as an “emotio-electro” band because of their hi-tech, synthesizer-driven sound mated to passionate vocals and sensitive lyrics.
David Frank and Mic Murphy met in the early 1980s while working for the soul/funk band Kleeer. Frank had gotten a break when Atlantic Records enlisted him as Kleeer’s tour keyboardist. The band’s road manager was Mic Murphy, and although Murphy was obviously aware of Frank’s skills, Frank was unaware Murphy could sing.

Later in New York City, David Frank was working on a session that evolved into a track called “It’s Passion” which was to feature a pre-stardom Madonna on vocals. However, due to creative differences, Madonna bowed out. Frank then remembered Murphy and invited him work on it. The results were so impressive that Atlantic Records offered Murphy and Frank a recording deal of their own. Murphy came up with the band’s name, and within weeks “It’s Passion” was receiving massive radio airplay in New York. “It’s Passion” became both a radio and club hit in New York. The interest sparked enough interest for Mirage to give David and Mic an advance for an album.
Career

The resulting 1983 album Sweat launched the club hits “Sweat,” “I Won’t Let Go” and the iconic “You Are In My System”, which became a number ten R&B smash. Robert Palmer’s cover of the song became a mainstream rock hit. In 1983 Mic & David also wrote and produced Pump the Nation, a one-off album for a project called Attitude. Attitude featured Khris Kellow, who worked on many of the later The System albums and appears as a member of the band in Beat Street video clip for Baptize the Beat.

In 1984 they released their second album, X-periment. Frank’s expertise in recording studio technology gave the material a sound that many felt was ahead of its time. Indeed, the heavy use of synths and electric percussion was a step beyond the dance-influenced flavour of the previous album, and Murphy’s soulful vocals gave the songs a definite R&B flavour. Besides the upbeat electronics-laden tracks, the album also introduced a more mature and pop-friendly quality, evident in tracks such as “Promises Can Break”, “I Wanna Make You Feel Good” and “I Can’t Take Losing You.” The System also appeared in the 1984 breakdancing film Beat Street and its soundtrack, performing Baptize The Beat.

band the system

The title track from their 1985 album The Pleasure Seekers was featured in the season two premiere episode of the hit NBC series Miami Vice. Other tracks on the album include “It Takes 2”, as well as “Love Won’t Wait For Lovin'” and “This Is For You”. In 1985, David Frank and Mic Murphy teamed up with Jeff Lorber to collaborate on Lorber’s album Step by Step.

Their version of the Marc Benno song “Rock N’ Roll Me Again” became famous in the 1984 action comedy Beverly Hills Cop with Eddie Murphy. The soundtrack album would go on to win a Grammy. They would also reach No. 23 on Billboard’s R&B chart with the title track from the 1988 Eddie Murphy film Coming to America. All of this success occurred while they were contributing their talents to projects such as the Scritti Politti album Cupid & Psyche 85, Phil Collins’ “Sussudio,” Chaka Khan’s “I Feel for You,” and “This Is My Night,” and Mtume’s “Juicy Fruit,” among many others.

The System’s greatest success came in 1987 with the release of the single “Don’t Disturb This Groove,” from the album of the same name. The duo hired Steven Machat and Rick Smith to be their managers. Machat and Smith took control of the promotion and marketing of the duo on behalf of Atlantic and helped the duo achieve their biggest US Pop hit, “Don’t Disturb This Groove”. The single reached No. 1 on the Billboard R&B chart and No. 4 on the Hot 100. The follow-up single, “Nighttime Lover,” was also a top 10 R&B hit, peaking at No. 7.

Murphy and Frank parted ways professionally after releasing their Rhythm & Romance album in 1989.

Murphy recorded the solo album Touch and charted in 1991 with a single from that project. Frank has found more recent success as a songwriter and producer, most notably for hit singles such as Christina Aguilera’s “Genie in a Bottle” in 1999, and teen girl-group Dream’s “He Loves U Not” in 2000.

In 2000, the duo reunited for the album ESP, which also featured a reworked version of “You Are In My System,” originally found on 1983’s Sweat.

Late 2009 saw the release of Unreleased Unleashed, a collection of prototype and unreleased songs recorded at various points over the span of The System’s recording career. Although two tracks, “Hole In My Love” and “You Are In My System (Redux)”, the previously-mentioned remake of their earlier single, were taken directly from the ESP album. Also, the track “Sonic Fire” was previously released as the B-Side for some 7″ singles of “I Wanna Make You Feel Good” in 1984.

2012 marks a reawakening of the “The System” with new 12″ remix collection of the seminal recording for the Breakdance film Beat Street, “Baptize the Beat”. The 12″ limited edition vinyl will be released on Electroavenue Records in the UK featuring remixes by Funkmaster Ozone, Fleck, Lloyd da Zoid / Diplomat & Sace.

The new System album tentatively titled “System Overload” is in full swing and its first single A-side “Motha” and Other-side “The Toast” mixed by legendary “Unique Recording Studio” mixer Chris Lord-Alge who’s association with the band dates to 1983 set to release Sept 2012 with full length to follow in October. The sessions took place in Topanga Canyon’s Canyon Reverb,The Village Recorders and NYC Spanish Harlem SPAHA Studios and with contributions from longtime collaborator guitarist Paul Pesco as well as drummer Steve Wolf aka WOLFADELIC and sound architect Tim K. New Recordings will be released on the bands Science Lab Records. The System.

Jeffrey Osborne – Stay With Me Tonight

Jeffrey Osborne

Jeffrey Linton Osborne (born March 9, 1948) is an American funk R&B musician, singer-songwriter, lyricist and lead singer of the band, L.T.D..
Osborne was born in Providence, Rhode Island. He is the youngest of 12 children and is part of a musical family. He has five brothers and six sisters, some of whom went on to have music careers (his brother Billy was an L.T.D. bandmate). Osborne’s father, Clarence “Legs” Osborne, was a popular trumpeter who played with Lionel Hampton, Count Basie, and Duke Ellington and died when Osborne was thirteen. Osborne started his music career in 1970 with a band called Love Men Ltd., who would later become known as L.T.D. The band recorded hit singles such as “(Every Time I Turn Around) Back in Love Again”, “Concentrate on You,” “Love Ballad” and “Holding On (When Love Is Gone)”. At first, Osborne was a drummer, sharing lead vocal duties with his brother Billy, but by 1978 he became the group’s primary lead vocalist. He and Billy both left L.T.D. in early 1980 to start solo careers. His solo success includes five gold and platinum albums.
Solo career

In 1982, Osborne released his self-titled debut album, which featured two hit singles, “On the Wings of Love” and “I Really Don’t Need No Light”, peaking at #29 & #39 on the pop chart respectively. This was followed up the next year by Stay with Me Tonight, his first gold album (later reaching platinum album status), which spawned two more hits, “Don’t You Get So Mad” (#25) and the title track (#30). “Stay with Me Tonight” (April 1984, #18) and “On the Wings of Love” (June 1984, #11) reached the UK Singles Chart.

In 1985, he wrote the lyrics to the Whitney Houston hit “All at Once” (music by Michael Masser). He appeared on USA for Africa’s fundraising single, “We Are the World” in 1985. He would later appear on Celebrity Duets in 2006, performing “On The Wings Of Love” with Alfonso Ribeiro. Osborne lent his vocals to the theme song of the soap opera, Loving, from 1992 to 1995 as well as the first season theme song for the Kirstie Alley comedy Veronica’s Closet.

jeffrey osborne

Osborne had two more gold albums, Don’t Stop and Emotional, the latter of which had his highest charting solo pop hit, “You Should Be Mine (The Woo Woo Song)”, which peaked at #13 in 1986.

The following year, Osborne had the highest-charting hit of his career duetting with Dionne Warwick on “Love Power”, which reached #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 and also topped the Adult Contemporary singles chart. This was a turning point in his pop success, as his albums and singles began charting lower and lower on the pop charts. Osborne’s 1988 single “She’s on the Left” would be his final Hot 100 entry, as well as his only #1 R&B hit.

After scoring two more substantial R&B hits in the early 1990s, “Only Human” and “If My Brother’s in Trouble”, Osborne would be absent from the charts for the remainder of the decade.

In the new millennium, he returned with a series of albums that, while far from the success he enjoyed in the 1980s, returned him to Adult R&B radio, scoring modest chart singles such as “Rest of Our Lives” (#75, 2003) and his cover of Barbara Mason’s classic “Yes, I’m Ready” (#64, 2005).

In 2008, Osborne sang the national anthem before Game 4 of the NBA Finals at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, a feat which he repeated in 2009, before Game 1 of the 2009 NBA Finals, and also again in 2010 before Game 1 of the NBA Finals, all at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. He also performed the national anthem prior to Game 3 of the 1988 World Series, a feat he repeated two years later at Game 3 of the 1990 World Series, both at the Oakland Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California. He also regularly sang the national anthem before Hartford Whalers games.

On March 1, 2010,Jeffrey  Osborne appeared on The Bachelor: On the Wings of Love season finale, “After the Final Rose”, singing his hit “On the Wings of Love” while Bachelor Jake Pavelka took to the dance floor with his newly announced fiance, Vienna Girardi.

Yarbrough & Peoples – Don’t stop the music – 1980 – Live

Yarbrough & Peoples

Yarbrough and Peoples was an American R&B duo from Dallas, Texas. Their biggest selling release was “Don’t Stop the Music,” a US Billboard R&B chart topper in 1981.
Cavin Yarbrough and Alisa Peoples both grew up in Dallas, Texas, having known each other since they were young children, as they had met taking piano lessons, after which they remained friends throughout their childhoods.

In the mid `70s Yarbrough, was on tour in the band of Leon Russell and met the Wilson Brothers who would go on to form the Gap Band. Upon returning to Dallas some months later, the twosome started the band Grand Theft, both as featured keyboardists as well as vocalists. In 1977, the Wilson Brothers had just joined Total Experience Records as the Gap Band and went down to Dallas to perform a concert. Later that night, trying to unwind after the show, the Wilsons caught the twosome’s act, and as a result, Lonnie Simmons invited the couple to Los Angeles where they began playing in clubs around Southern California.

Two years later, they signed their own recording contract with Total Experience and recorded and released their debut album, The Two Of Us. which contained “Don’t Stop the Music,” topping the US Billboard R&B chart in early 1981, knocking their label-mate’s song “Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)” out of the top spot. The song went on to chart higher on the Billboard Hot 100 than any of the other songs released on the label up to that time. In addition, the corresponding album went Gold and peaked at #16 in the Billboard Hot 200 album chart. Across the pond in Europe, the UK release of the song reached #7 in the UK Singles Chart and was also certified Gold.

yarbrough peoples

The duo continued on with its R&B success throughout the 1980s, with four more Top 10 R&B hits entitled “Heartbeats” (R&B #10 in 1983), “Don’t Waste Your Time” (Pop #48, R&B #1 in 1984; #60 UK), “Guilty” (R&B #2 in 1986; #53 UK), and “I Wouldn’t Lie” (R&B #6 in 1986; #61 UK), all of which brought the band success. After Guilty, their final album for Total Experience, Yarbrough and Peoples left the label in 1986.

After leaving Total Experience, Yarbrough and Peoples married the following year, and tiring of the Southern California grind, returned to their hometown of Dallas and started their own music production company, Yarbrough & Peoples Productions. Today, they continue to write, produce and perform concerts, mentor other gifted newcomers, and otherwise continue to leave their indelible stamp on the music industry.

Howard Johnson – So Fine


Howard Johnson, born November 28, 1956, in Miami[1] (Florida) is a former American soul/disco singer, and founder of the group Niteflyte. He charted two songs on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart during the eighties – “So Fine,” which spent one week at #1 in 1982, and “Let This Dream Be Real,” which reached #19 in 1984.

Studio albums

1982: Keepin’ Love New
1983: Doin’ It My Way [2]
1985: The Vision [2]
1989: Johnson & Branson with Regis Branson
2003: Packed & Waitin’ with Regis Branson
2011: Bring it on

Singles

1982: “Keepin’ Love New” – UK #45 (double A-side)[3]
1982: “So Fine” – UK #45 (double A-side)[3]
1983: “Let This Dream Be Real”
1983: “Let’s Take Time Out”
1985: “Stand Up”
1985: “Knees”
2011: “Every Little Thing”

Bill Withers – Ain’t No Sunshine – Live


William Harrison “Bill” Withers, Jr. (born July 4, 1938) is an American singer-songwriter and musician who performed and recorded from 1970 until 1985.[1] He recorded a number of major hits including “Lean on Me”, “Ain’t No Sunshine”, “Use Me”, “Just the Two of Us”, “Lovely Day”, and “Grandma’s Hands”. His life was the subject of the 2009 documentary film Still Bill.[1]
Withers was born the youngest of six children in the small coal-mining town of Slab Fork, West Virginia. Raised in nearby Beckley, West Virginia, he was thirteen years old when his father died.[2] Withers enlisted with the United States Navy at the age of eighteen and served for nine years, during which time he became interested in singing and writing songs. Discharged from the Navy in 1965, he relocated to Los Angeles in 1967 for a musical career.[3]

Withers worked as an assembler for several different companies, including Douglas Aircraft Corporation, while recording demo tapes with his own money, shopping them around and performing in clubs at night. When he debuted with the song “Ain’t No Sunshine” he refused to resign his job because of his belief that the music business was a fickle industry and that he was still a novice compared to other acts.
Career
Sussex Records

During early 1970, Withers’ demonstration tape was auditioned favorably by Clarence Avant, owner of Sussex Records. Avant signed Withers to a record deal and assigned former Stax Records stalwart Booker T. Jones to produce Withers’ first album. Four three-hour studio sessions were planned to record the album, but funding caused the album to be recorded in three sessions with a six-month break between the second and final sessions. Just as I Am was released in 1971 with the tracks, “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Grandma’s Hands” as singles. The album features Stephen Stills playing lead guitar.[4]

The album was a success and Withers began touring with a band assembled from members of The Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band: drummer James Gadson, guitarist Benorce Blackmon, keyboardist Ray Jackson, and bassist Melvin Dunlap.

At the 14th annual Grammy Awards on Tuesday, March 14, 1972, Withers won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Song for “Ain’t No Sunshine.” The track had already sold over one million copies and was awarded a platinum disc by the R.I.A.A. in September 1971.[5]

During a hiatus from touring, Withers recorded his second album, Still Bill. The single, “Lean on Me” went to number one the week of July 8, 1972. It was Withers’ second gold single with confirmed sales in excess of three million.[5] His follow-up, “Use Me” released in August 1972, became his third million seller, with the R.I.A.A. gold disc award taking place on October 12, 1972.[5] His performance at Carnegie Hall on October 6, 1972, was recorded, and released as the live album Bill Withers, Live at Carnegie Hall on November 30, 1972. In 1974, Withers recorded the album +’Justments. Due to a legal dispute with the Sussex company, Withers was unable to record for some time thereafter.

During this time, he wrote and produced two songs on the Gladys Knight & the Pips record I Feel a Song, and in October 1974 performed in concert together with James Brown, Etta James, and B. B. King four weeks prior to the historic Rumble in the Jungle fight between Foreman and Ali in Zaire.[6] Footage of his performance was included in the 1996 documentary film When We Were Kings, and he is heard on the accompanying soundtrack. Other footage of his performance is included in the 2008 documentary film Soul Power which is based on archival footage of the 1974 Zaire concert.
Columbia Records

After Sussex Records folded, Withers signed with Columbia Records in 1975. His first release with the label, Making Music, Making Friends, included the single “She’s Lonely”, which was featured in the film Looking for Mr. Goodbar. During the next three years he released an album each year with Naked & Warm (1976), Menagerie (1977, containing the successful “Lovely Day”), “Bout Love” (1978) and “Get On Down”; the latter song also included on the Looking for Mr. Goodbar soundtrack.

In 1976, Withers performed “Ain’t No Sunshine” on Saturday Night Live.[7]

Due to problems with Columbia, he concentrated on joint projects between 1977 and 1985, including the successful “Just the Two of Us”, with jazz saxophonist Grover Washington, Jr., which was released during June 1980. It won a Grammy on February 24, 1982. Withers next did “Soul Shadows” with The Crusaders, and “In the Name of Love” with Ralph MacDonald, the latter being nominated for a Grammy for vocal performance.

In 1985 came Watching You Watching Me, which featured the Top 40-rated R&B single “Oh Yeah”, and ended Withers’ business association with Columbia Records.
Post-Columbia career

In 1988, a new version of “Lovely Day” from the 1977 Menagerie album, entitled “Lovely Day (Sunshine Mix)” and remixed by Ben Liebrand, reached the Top 10 in the United Kingdom, leading to Withers’ performance on the long-running Top of the Pops that year. The original release had reached #7 in the UK in early 1978, and the re-release climbed higher to #4.

In 1987, he received his ninth Grammy Award nomination and on March 2, 1988, his third Grammy for Best Rhythm and Blues Song as songwriter for the re-recording of “Lean On Me” by Club Nouveau on their debut album Life, Love and Pain, released in 1986 on Warner Bros. Records.

In 1996, a portion of his song “Grandma’s Hands” was sampled in the song “No Diggity” by BLACKstreet, featuring Dr. Dre. The single went to Number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and sold 1.6 million copies and won a Grammy in 1999 for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

Withers contributed two songs to Jimmy Buffett’s 2004 release License to Chill. Following the reissues of Still Bill on January 28, 2003, and Just As I Am on March 8, 2005, there was speculation of previously unreleased material being issued as a new album.[8] In 2006, Sony gave back to Withers his previously unreleased tapes.

In 2007, “Lean On Me” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
Personal life

Withers married actress Denise Nicholas in 1973, during her stint on the sitcom Room 222. The couple divorced the following year.[9] In 1976, Withers married Marcia Johnson and they had two children, Todd and Kori. Marcia eventually assumed the direct management of his Beverly Hills-based publishing companies, in which his children also became involved as they became adults.[10]

3RDEYEGIRL – Shes Allways in my Hair – Live

3rd eye girl

3rd eye girl, stylized as 3RDEYEGIRL, is the current backing band for Prince. They released the LP Plectrumelectrum on September 30, 2014.
Plectrumelectrum, stylized as PLECTRUMELECTRUM, is the thirty-fourth studio album by American musician recording artist Prince and the debut LP by 3rdeyegirl. It was released simultaneously with his solo thirty-third album Art Official Age on September 30, 2014.
Track listing:3rd eye girl

All songs written and composed by Prince.
No. Title Length
1. “Wow” 4:28
2. “Pretzelbodylogic” 3:26
3. “Aintturninround” 3:02
4. “Plectrumelectrum” 4:51
5. “Whitecaps” 3:43
6. “Fixurlifeup” 3:12
7. “Boytrouble” (featuring Lizzo and Sophia Eris) 3:53
8. “Stopthistrain” 3:41
9. “Anotherlove” 4:16
10. “Tictactoe” 3:38
11. “Marz” 1:48
12. “Funknroll” 4:10     3rd eye girl

3rd eye girl

Technotronic – Get Up – Extended Version

Technotronic,

is a Belgian studio-based music project formed in 1988 by Jo Bogaert, who originally gained notoriety in the early 1980s as part of a cover band and as a solo artist under various New Beat projects, including The Acts of Madmen and Nux Nemo. Together with vocalist Ya Kid K, he produced the hit single, “Pump Up the Jam”, which was originally an instrumental. An image for the act was later put together, utilizing Congolese-born fashion model Felly Kilingi as its album/single cover art, and supposed singer in the music video.
“Pump Up The Jam”

The track that became “Pump Up The Jam” began life as “Technotronic” (which in turn became the project’s official name), an original instrumental that Bogaert released under the name The Pro 24s. Based on Farley Jackmaster Funk’s “The Acid Life,” this instrumental initially included vocal samples from Eddie Murphy’s “Delirious” live set and was months later replaced by newer music, along with lyrics and vocals from Ya Kid K. prior to the song’s international release in September 1989.

The song became a worldwide success, eventually reaching #2 in both the US Billboard Hot 100 and the UK Singles Chart in late 1989/early 1990. It not only introduced a new sound based on “New Beat”, a dance genre developed around the Belgian music scene, but it was also one of the first songs outside of Chicago, Illinois, to pioneer the hip-house genre, a fusion of house music with elements of hip-hop.

technotronicFurther career

The success of the project’s first single led to the release of Pump Up the Jam: The Album, which featured tracks by Ya Kid K and MC Eric. They also became an opening act for Madonna and had appearances on Saturday Night Live, The Arsenio Hall Show, and It’s Showtime at the Apollo. It was at this time that Ya Kid K became Technotronic’s actual featured vocalist after it was revealed that Felly was merely lip-synching the vocals in the video for “Pump Up The Jam”.

Three follow-up singles, “Get Up! (Before The Night Is Over)”, a #7 hit in the US and a #2 hit in the UK; “This Beat Is Technotronic” (US Dance #3, UK #14); and “Rockin´ Over The Beat” (UK #9), also reached the Top 10 in many countries, and the album eventually climbed into the Top 10 of the Billboard 200 in the US and reached #2 in the UK Albums Chart.

In 1990, Kamosi contributed vocals on the single “Spin That Wheel”, as part of Technotronic’s “side project” Hi-Tek 3, for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles soundtrack.

A megamix was released compiling many of Technotronic‘s previous hits. Released as a single, it peaked at #6 in the UK and #1 on the Eurochart Hot 100.

technotronicTechnotronic feat. Monday Midnite – “Like This” (1999)
An excerpt from Technotronic’s “Like This” (1999), which features a distinctive touch of Detroit techno within house structure. This sound gave prominence to tech house and electrotech.

In 1992, the song “Move This” (also featuring Kamosi) from the album became popular through its use in a Revlon television commercial, and it became their third Top 10 hit in the United States, peaking at #6. With renewed interest in the album, it was repackaged in 1992 with the same track listing, but this time it featured Ya Kid K on the cover.

They later came back with “Like This” (1999), featuring Monday Midnite. It combined deep house and techno elements, making it an early example of the tech house genre, and giving prominence to electrotech.

Technotronic has sold approximately 14 million albums and singles worldwide.
20th anniversary (1989–2009)

MC Eric and Ya Kid K. reunited and have toured parts of Europe, South America and Australia, as a part of commemorating Technotronic’s 20th anniversary, performing their classic hits as well as new material. MC Eric also tours as a DJ.

technotronic

Cindy Lauper – All Through the Night – Live Performance

Cindy Lauper,

Cynthia Ann Stephanie “Cyndi” Lauper (born June 22, 1953) is an American singer, songwriter, and actress with a career spanning over 30 years. Her debut solo album She’s So Unusual (1983) was the first debut female album to chart four top-five hits on the Billboard Hot 100—”Girls Just Want to Have Fun”, “Time After Time”, “She Bop”, and “All Through the Night” earned Lauper the Best New Artist award at the 27th Grammy Awards in 1985. Her success continued with the soundtrack for the motion picture The Goonies and her second record True Colors (1986). This album included the number one hit of the same name and “Change of Heart” which peaked at number 3.

Since 1989, Lauper has released nine studio albums and has participated in many other projects. Her most recent album, Memphis Blues, became Billboard’s most successful blues album of the year, remaining at #1 on the Billboard Blues Albums chart for 13 consecutive weeks. In 2013, Lauper won the Best Score for the Broadway musical Kinky Boots, making her the first woman in history to win the composing category solo.[3] She also became the first artist in over 25 years to top the dance charts with a Broadway single. In 2014, Lauper was awarded the Grammy for best musical theater album for Kinky Boots.

Lauper has established herself as a pop icon winning awards at the Grammy, Emmy, Tony, New York’s Outer Critics Circle, MTV VMA, Billboard, and AMA awards. Lauper won the inaugural Best Female Video prize at the 1984 VMAs for Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. This music video is recognized by MTV, VH1 and Rolling Stone as one of the greatest music videos of all time. She is featured in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum’s Women Who Rock exhibit, which illustrates the important role that women have played in Rock and Roll music.Her debut album is included in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, while Time After Time is included in Vh1’s list of the 100 Best Songs of the Past 25 years. VH1 has ranked Lauper No. 58 of the 100 Greatest Women of Rock & Roll. Lauper is also one of only twenty artists to achieve “GET” status by winning competitive Grammy, Emmy, and Tony awards. To date she has sold over 50 million records and 20 million singles.

cindy lauperLauper has also been celebrated for her humanitarian work, particularly as an advocate for gay and transgender rights in the United States. Her charitable efforts were recognized in 2013 when the singer was invited as a special guest to attend President Barack Obama’s second-term inaugural ceremony.
Cyndi Lauper was born in Queens, New York to a Catholic family. Her father was of German and Swiss descent, and her mother is Italian American (from Sicily). Lauper has a younger brother named Fred (nicknamed Butch), and an older sister, Ellen. Lauper’s parents divorced when she was five years old, and her mother subsequently remarried and divorced again.

Lauper grew up in Ozone Park and as a child, listened such artists as the Beatles, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, and Billie Holiday. At age 12, she began writing her own songs and playing an acoustic guitar given to her by her sister.

Even when she was young, Lauper expressed herself with a variety of hair colors, eccentric clothing, and even took a friend’s advice to spell her name as “Cyndi” rather than “Cindy”.

Lauper was accepted to a special public high school for students with talent in the visual arts but eventually dropped out; she later earned her GED. She left home at age 17, to escape her abusive stepfather,[19] with the intent to study art. Her journey took her to Canada, where she spent two weeks in the woods with her dog Sparkle, trying to find herself. She eventually traveled to Vermont, where she took art classes at Johnson State College and supported herself working odd jobs.

In the early 1970s, Lauper performed as a vocalist with various cover bands in the New York metropolitan area (such as Doc West and Flyer), singing hits by bands including Bad Company, Jefferson Airplane, and Led Zeppelin. Although Lauper was performing on stage, she was not happy singing cover songs. In 1977, Lauper damaged her vocal cords and took a year off from singing. She was told by doctors that she would never sing again but regained her voice with the help of vocal coach Katie Agresta.

cindy lauper
1980–1982: Blue Angel

In 1978, Lauper met saxophone player John Turi through her manager Ted Rosenblatt. Turi and Lauper formed a band named Blue Angel and recorded a demo tape of original music. Steve Massarsky, manager of The Allman Brothers Band, heard the tape and liked Lauper’s voice. He bought Blue Angel’s contract for $5,000 and became their manager.

Lauper received recording offers as a solo artist, but held out, wanting the band to be included in any deal she made. Blue Angel was eventually signed by Polydor Records and released a self-titled album on the label in 1980. Lauper hated the album cover, saying that it made her look like Big Bird, but Rolling Stone magazine later included it as one of the 100 best new wave album covers (2003). Despite critical acclaim, the album sold poorly (or “went lead”, as Lauper says) and the band broke up. The members of Blue Angel had a falling out with Massarsky and fired him as their manager. He later filed an $80,000 suit against them, which forced Lauper into bankruptcy.[24] After this Lauper temporarily lost her voice due to an inverted cyst in her vocal cord.

After Blue Angel broke up and due to her financial problems, Lauper spent time working in retail stores, waitressing at IHOP (which she quit after being demoted to hostess when the manager made a pass at her), and singing in local clubs. Her most frequent gigs were at El Sombrero. Music critics who saw Lauper perform with Blue Angel believed she had star potential due to her four-octave singing range, and a unique vocal style. In 1981, while singing in a local New York bar, Lauper met David Wolff, who took over as her manager and had her sign a recording contract with Portrait Records, a subsidiary of Epic Records.
1983–1985: She’s So Unusual

On October 14, 1983, Lauper released her first solo album, She’s So Unusual. The album peaked at No. 4 in the US, and became a worldwide hit. The primary studio musicians were Rick Chertoff, Eric Bazilian, and Rob Hyman (of The Hooters), Richard Termini and Peter Wood. Lauper became popular with teenagers and critics, in part due to her hybrid punk image which was crafted by stylist Patrick Lucas.

Lauper was interested in writing her own songs, but the record company provided her with songs to record that were written by other writers. Lauper sometimes changed the lyrics in the material she was given by the record company, such is the case with “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”. Lauper found the original lyrics to be misogynistic, so she rewrote the song as an anthem for young women.

The album’s second single “Time After Time” was co-written by Lauper and Rob Hyman. “Time After Time” hit No. 1 on both Billboard Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts. The song would earn Lauper an RIAA Gold certification for record sales that reached 500,000 copies.

The other Billboard Hot 100 singles on She’s So Unusual were “She Bop” (No. 3), “All Through the Night” (No. 5), written by Jules Shear and “Money Changes Everything” (No.27).

The album also includes two cover songs, The Brains’ new wave track “Money Changes Everything” (No.27 on the Billboard Hot 100) and Prince’s “When You Were Mine”. The album made Lauper the first female to have four consecutive Billboard Hot 100 top five hits from one album. The LP stayed in the Top 200 charts for more than 65 weeks, and since has sold 22 million copies worldwide.

Lauper won Best New Artist at the 1985 Grammy Awards. She’s So Unusual also received nominations for Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance (for “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”), and Song of the Year (for “Time After Time”). It also won the Grammy for Best Album Package, which went to the art director, Janet Perr.

The video for “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” won the inaugural award for Best Female Video at the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards, and made Lauper an MTV staple. The video featured professional wrestling manager “Captain” Lou Albano as Lauper’s father, her real-life mother, Catrine, as her mother,[citation needed] and also featured her attorney, her manager, her brother Butch, and her dog Sparkle.[citation needed] In 1984-1985, Lauper appeared on the covers of Rolling Stone magazine, Time, and Newsweek. She appeared twice on the cover of People, and was named a Ms. magazine woman of the year in 1985.[31]

In 1985, Lauper participated in USA for Africa’s famine-relief fund-raising single “We Are the World”, singing a climactic soprano part in the bridge.

Lauper appeared with professional wrestler Hulk Hogan, who played her “bodyguard”.[citation needed] She later would make many appearances as herself in a number of the World Wrestling Federation’s “Rock ‘n’ Wrestling Connection” events, and played Wendi Richter’s manager in the inaugural WrestleMania event. Dave Wolff, Lauper’s boyfriend and manager at the time, was a wrestling fan as a boy, and engineered the rock and wrestling connection.

In 1985, Lauper released the single “The Goonies ‘R’ Good Enough”, from the soundtrack to the movie The Goonies, and an accompanying video which featured several wrestling stars. The song reached number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.
1986–1988: True Colors and Vibes

Lauper received two nominations at the 1986 Grammy Awards: Best Female Rock Vocal Performance for “What a Thrill” and Best Long Form Music Video for Cyndi: Live in Paris.

Lauper released her second album, True Colors, on September 15, 1986. It reached No. 4 on the Billboard 200 and sold 2 million copies in the United States. Lauper increased her involvement in production and songwriting on her second album, and she co-wrote most of the songs with Essra Mohawk, John Turi, Billy Steinberg, and Tom Kelly. Guests on the album included Angela Clemons-Patrick, Nile Rodgers, Aimee Mann, Billy Joel, Adrian Belew, The Bangles, Ellie Greenwich, and Rick Derringer.

True Colors was not as commercially successful as She’s So Unusual, but it did contain three high-charting singles, including the title track, “True Colors”, which became Lauper’s second song to hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100; “Change of Heart” (No. 3); and a cover of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” (No. 12). A fourth single from the album, “Boy Blue”, did not reach the top-40, but the proceeds of that song were donated to AIDS research. The song “True Colors” (written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly) was licensed to Kodak for use in its commercials.

In 1986, Lauper appeared on the Billy Joel album The Bridge, with a song called “Code of Silence”. She is credited as having written the lyrics with Joel and she sings it as a duet with him. In the same year, Lauper also sang the theme song for the series Pee-wee’s Playhouse, though she was credited as “Ellen Shaw”. In 1987, David Wolff produced a concert film for Lauper called Cyndi: Live in Paris. The concert was broadcast on HBO.

cindy lauper

Lauper made her film debut in August 1988 in the quirky comedy Vibes, alongside Jeff Goldblum, Julian Sands, Elizabeth Peña, and Peter Falk. Lauper played a psychic in search of a city of gold in South America. Ron Howard produced the film, with David Wolff as associate producer. To prepare for the role, Lauper took a few classes in finger waving and hair setting at the Robert Fiance School of Beauty in New York, and studied with a few Manhattan psychics. The film was poorly received by critics and flopped commercially.

Lauper contributed a track called “Hole in My Heart (All the Way to China)” for the Vibes soundtrack, but the song was not included. A music video was released, a high energy, comic action/adventure romp through a Chinese laundry. The song stalled at a disappointing No. 54 on the US charts, but fared better in Australia, peaking at No. 8 and becoming her fifth and final Top 10 single in Australia. “Hole in My Heart (All the Way to China)” was performed as the opening song on her 2008 Australian tour.

A Night to Remember – Lauper’s third album – was released in the spring of 1989. The album had only one hit, the No. 6 single “I Drove All Night”. Lauper received a Grammy nomination for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance at the 1990 Grammy Awards for “I Drove All Night”, but overall album sales for A Night to Remember were disappointing. The music video for the album’s song “My First Night Without You” made history as one of the first to be closed-captioned for the hearing impaired.

On July 21, 1990, Lauper joined Roger Waters’ and other artists performing “Another Brick in the Wall, Part II” as part of the concert The Wall in Berlin. As part of the concert, Lauper also performed “The Tide Is Turning” with Waters, Joni Mitchell, Bryan Adams, Paul Carrack, and Van Morrison. Three hundred thousand people attended the concert and over five million people worldwide watched on live television.

Because of a friendship with Yoko Ono, Lauper took part in the May 1990 John Lennon tribute concert in Liverpool, performing the Beatles song “Hey Bulldog” and the John Lennon song “Working Class Hero”. She also took part in a project Ono and Lennon’s son Sean developed called “The Peace Choir”, performing a new version of Lennon’s “Give Peace a Chance”.

In November 1991, Lauper married actor David Thornton.
1993–1995: Hat Full of Stars and Twelve Deadly Cyns

Lauper’s fourth album, Hat Full of Stars was released in June 1993 and was met with much critical acclaim. However, due to a lack of support from her record label, the project was not adequately promoted and was a sales failure. The album, which tackled such topics as homophobia, spousal abuse, racism, and abortion sold less than 120,000 copies in the United States and peaked at No. 112 on the Billboard charts.The video for the album’s song “Sally’s Pigeons” features the then-unknown Julia Stiles as the young Cyndi.

Lauper co-wrote several songs for the album with Mary Chapin Carpenter, Ailee Willis, Nicky Holland, Tom Gray, Hugh Masekela, and The Hooters. That same year, Lauper recorded “Boys Will Be Boys” with The Hooters for their album Out of Body. The Hooters dedicated their song “Private Emotion” to her.

The greatest hits album, Twelve Deadly Cyns…and Then Some, was released outside of the US in 1994 and reached US audiences in summer of 1995. It included two re-recorded tracks, “I’m Gonna be Strong”, originally recorded with Blue Angel, and a reworking of her first hit, newly christened “Hey Now (Girls Just Want to Have Fun)”. Twelve Deadly Cyns sold over five million copies worldwide.

In 1993, Lauper returned to acting, playing Michael J. Fox’s ditzy secretary in Life with Mikey. She also won an Emmy Award[38] for her role as Marianne on the sitcom Mad About You.
1996–2000: Motherhood and Sisters of Avalon
Lauper performing in 2000

On November 19, 1997, Lauper gave birth to her son Declyn Wallace Lauper Thornton. Her fifth album, Sisters of Avalon, was released in Japan in 1996 and elsewhere in 1997. The album was written and produced with the help of Jan Pulsford (Lauper’s keyboard player) and producer Mark Saunders. As in Hat Full of Stars, some of the songs in Sisters of Avalon addressed dark themes. The song “Ballad of Cleo and Joe” addressed the complications of a drag queen’s double life. The song “Say a Prayer” was written for a friend of hers who had died from AIDS. “Unhook the Stars” was used in the movie of the same name. Like Lauper’s previous album, her record label did not support the alternative and controversial songs and with a lack of major promotion it failed in America, spending a single week on the Billboard album chart at No. 188. Despite the commercial failure, like her previous release the album was met with much critical praise including People magazine, which declared it “90s nourishment for body and soul. Lauper sets a scene, makes us care, gives us hope.” The album was written and produced with the help of Jan Pulsford (Lauper’s keyboard player) and producer Mark Saunders.

In November 1998, Lauper released the Christmas album Merry Christmas…Have a Nice Life. The album contained both original material and standards, and was co-produced and mixed by William Wittman.

cindy lauper

On January 17, 1999, Lauper appeared as an animated version of herself in The Simpsons episode “Wild Barts Can’t Be Broken”. In the episode, Lauper sings the National Anthem to the melody of “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”. In the same year, Lauper opened for Cher’s Do You Believe? Tour alongside Wild Orchid.[citation needed] She also appeared in the films Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle and The Opportunists.

Lauper contributed a cover version of The Trammps’s “Disco Inferno” to the soundtrack for the film A Night at the Roxbury. The song was also released as an EP and earned Lauper one nomination at the 1999 Grammy Awards for Best Dance Recording. In 2000, Lauper contributed the song “I Want a Mom That Will Last Forever” to the children’s movie Rugrats in Paris. The song was written with Mark Mothersbaugh. In 2000, Lauper also co-wrote the song “If You Believe” with Faye Tozer of the British pop group Steps, for the band’s third studio album, Buzz.
2001–2004: Shine and At Last

In 2001,Cindy Lauper prepared a new album Shine. The album was a return to her early punk-rock sound and featured Japanese pop superstar Ryuichi Sakamoto, and George Fullan of Train. Just weeks before the album’s scheduled release on September 11, 2001, her label (Edel America Records) folded. A five-song EP of Shine was released in June 2002, but the full-length album was released exclusively in Japan. An album of Shine remixes was eventually released through Tower Records.

On October 12, 2000, Lauper took part in the television show Women in Rock, Girls with Guitars performing with Ann Wilson of Heart and with the girl group, Destiny’s Child. A CD of the songs performed was released exclusively to Sears stores from September 30 to October 31, 2001, and was marketed as a fundraiser for breast cancer.

In 2002, Sony issued a best-of CD, The Essential Cyndi Lauper. Lauper also released a cover album with Sony/Epic Records entitled At Last (formerly Naked City), which was released in 2003. At Last received one nomination at the 2005 Grammy Awards: Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s), for “Unchained Melody”. The effort was also a commercial hit, selling 4.5 million records

In April, 2004, Lauper performed during the VH1’s benefit concert Divas Live 2004 alongside Ashanti, Gladys Knight, Jessica Simpson, Joss Stone and Patti LaBelle, in support of the Save the Music Foundation.
2005–2007: The Body Acoustic

In 2005, under a new contract with Sony Music, Lauper released The Body Acoustic, an album that featured acoustic reinterpretations of tracks from her back catalog. The album also included two new tracks one of which was “Above the Clouds”. Guest performers on the album included Shaggy, Ani DiFranco, Adam Lazzara of Taking Back Sunday, Jeff Beck, Puffy AmiYumi, Sarah McLachlan, and Vivian Green. “Time After Time” with Sarah McLachlan charted on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart.

While she wasn’t making music, Lauper stayed busy. She made appearances on Showtime’s hit show Queer As Folk in 2005, directed a commercial for Totally 80s edition of the board game Trivial Pursuit in 2006, served as a judge on the 6th Annual Independent Music Awards and made her Broadway debut in the Tony-nominated The Threepenny Opera as Jenny. She also performed with Shaggy, Scott Weiland of Velvet Revolver/Stone Temple Pilots, Pat Monahan of Train, Ani DiFranco, and The Hooters in the VH1 Classics special Decades Rock Live. In 2007, she sang “Beecharmer” with Nellie McKay on McKay’s Pretty Little Head album, and “Letters To Michael” with Dionne Warwick.

On October 16, 2006, Lauper was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame.
2008–2009: Bring Ya to the Brink
Cyndi Lauper performing in 2008

In 2009,Cindy Lauper took a role and wrote a song for the Serbian movie Here and There, which stars her husband, David Thornton, in one of the main roles.

Lauper’s sixth studio album, Bring Ya to the Brink was released in the United States on May 27, 2008. By the time of the album’s US release, the single “Set Your Heart” already had significant airplay in Japan and Lauper had already begun an Australian tour with Katie Noonan and Kate Miller-Heidke. The album featured dance tracks written with artists including Axwell, The Scumfrog, Basement Jaxx, Digital Dog, Dragonette, Kleerup, and others. Bring Ya to the Brink received one Grammy nomination for Best Electronic/Dance Album and charted two #1 hits on the Billboard Dance chart. “Set Your Heart” was used in the Japanese advertising campaign for the 2008 Toyota Car Model (MarkX ZIO).

“Into the Nightlife”
Other projects for 2008 included the 2008 True Colors Tour and a Christmas duet with Swedish band The Hives, entitled “A Christmas Duel”. The song was released as a CD single and a 7″ vinyl in Sweden. Lauper also performed on the “Girls Night Out”, headlining it with Rosie O’Donnell in the US.

Lauper’s TV appearances in 2009 included performing on the American soap opera As the World Turns, performing “Time After Time” as a duet with Allison Iraheta on the season 8 finale of American Idol, and appearing at the 2009 TV Land Awards on April 19 dressed as the “Empress of Evil” for a musical tribute to Sid Krofft and Marty Krofft. Lauper performed a duet with Leona Lewis on VH1 Divas on September 19, 2009, singing “True Colors”, and performed a comedy skit with Eminem at the MTV VMA’s in September 2009. She also played herself in 30 Rock’s third season finale and appeared as Avalon Harmonia, a psychic, on the Season 5 premiere of Bones.

On November 17, 2009, Lauper performed a collaborative work with Wyclef Jean called “Slumdog Millionaire” and performed it live on the Late Show with David Letterman. The collaborative effort stems from Jean’s latest album: Toussaint St. Jean: From the Hut, To the Projects, To the Mansion.
2010–2012: The Celebrity Apprentice, Memphis Blues, memoir

In January 2010, American toy company Mattel released a Cyndi Lauper Barbie doll as part of their “Ladies of the 80s” series.

In March 2010, Lauper appeared on NBC’s The Celebrity Apprentice, coming in sixth place. She donated her winnings to her own True Colors Fund. Lauper also performed a song from her upcoming album Memphis Blues in the show’s live season finale.cindy lauper

Memphis Blues—Lauper’s 7th studio album—was released on June 22, 2010 and debuted on the Billboard Blues Albums chart at No. 1, and at No. 26 on the Billboard Top 200. The album remained No. 1 on the Blues Albums chart for 14 consecutive weeks; Memphis Blues was nominated for Best Traditional Blues Album at the 2011 Grammy Awards.

Lauper made international news in March 2011 for giving an impromptu performance of “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” while waiting for a delayed flight at Aeroparque Jorge Newbery in Buenos Aires. A video of the performance was later posted on YouTube.

In November 2011, she released two Christmas singles exclusive to iTunes. The first release was a Blues-inspired cover of Elvis Presley’s classic “Blue Christmas”, and the second was a new version of “Home for the holidays”, a duet with Norah Jones. In June 2012, Lauper made her first appearance for WWE in 27 years, to promote WWE Raw’s 1000th episode to memorialize “Captain” Lou Albano

In September 2012, she performed at fashion designer Betsey Johnson’s 40 year Retrospective Fashion show.

During 2012 Lauper also released a New York Times Best Selling memoir that detailed her struggle with child abuse and depression.
2013–present: Kinky Boots, She’s So Unusual: A 30th Anniversary Celebration & more

Lauper composed music for the Broadway musical Kinky Boots with Harvey Fierstein. The musical, based on the 2006 independent film Kinky Boots, opened in Chicago in October 2012, and opened on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on April 4, 2013. In May, Lauper won for best score for Kinky Boots at the 63rd annual Outer Critics Circle Awards. The musical led the 2013 Tony Awards, with 13 nominations and a season high of six wins including Best Musical and Best Actor. Lauper won the award for Best Original Score. This award named Lauper as the first woman to win solo in this category.

In the summer of 2013, in celebration of the 30th anniversary of her debut album She’s So Unusual, Lauper embarked on an international tour covering America and Australia. The show consisted of a mix of fan favorites and the entirety of the She’s So Unusual record. She will also be a special guest performer on 36 dates of Cher’s Dressed to Kill Tour, starting April 23, 2014. A new album has been confirmed by Lauper on a website interview,

Lauper presented the GRAMMY Pre-Telecast which took place at the Nokia Theatre, L.A. on Jan. 26 where she later accepted a Grammy for Kinky Boots (Best Musical Theater Album).

On April 1 (March 1 in Europe), Lauper released the 30th Anniversary edition of She’s So Unusual through Epic Records It featured a remastered version of the original album plus three new remixes and the Deluxe Edition featured bonus tracks such as demos a live recording as well as a 3D cut-out of the bedroom featured in the ‘Girls Just Want to Have Fun’ music video with a reusable sticker set. She also appeared as a special guest on Cher’s Dressed to Kill Tour, where she performed a set-list mostly consisting of songs on the She’s So Unusual album.

On the 17th of September, Cyndi Lauper sang on the finale of America’s Got Talent.

On the 25th of September, as part of NBC’s TODAY’s Shine a Light series,Cindy Lauper re-recorded True Colors in a mash up with Sara Bareilles’ Brave to raise awareness and money for children battling cancer.

Phil Collins – I Don’t Care Anymore (Live Perkins Palace 1982)

Phil Collins,

Philip David Charles “Phil” Collins, LVO (born 30 January 1951), is an English singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and actor. He gained fame as both drummer and lead vocalist for the rock group Genesis, and he gained worldwide fame as a solo artist. Collins is one of the most successful songwriters and performers of all time, singing the lead vocals on dozens of hit albums and singles in the United Kingdom and the United States between 1976 and 2010, either as a solo artist or with Genesis. His solo singles, sometimes dealing with lost love and often featuring his distinctive gated reverb drum sound, ranged from the atmospheric “In the Air Tonight”, dance-rock of “Sussudio”, piano-driven power ballad “Against All Odds”, to the political and religious connotations of “Another Day in Paradise”. AllMusic has described Collins as “one of the most successful pop and adult contemporary singers of the ’80s and beyond”.

Collins joined Genesis in 1970 as the group’s drummer and became their lead vocalist in 1975 following the departure of original frontman Peter Gabriel. His solo career, which was launched in 1981 and was heavily influenced by his personal life and soul music, brought both himself and Genesis greater commercial success. Collins’s total worldwide sales as a solo artist are 150 million. Collins has won numerous music awards throughout his career, including seven Grammy Awards, six Brit Awards—winning Best British Male three times, three American Music Awards, an Academy Award, two Golden Globe Awards and a Disney Legend Award in 2002 for his solo work. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1999, was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2003, and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Genesis in 2010. Collins was listed at number 22 in Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Drummers of All Time”, number 10 in a countdown by Gigwise and number 9 by MusicRadar.

phil collins

Collins is one of only three recording artists (along with Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson) who have sold over 100 million albums worldwide both as solo artists and (separately) as principal members of a band. During his most successful period as a solo artist between 1981 and 1990, Collins had three UK number-one singles and seven number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, as well as a US number one with Genesis in 1986. When his work with Genesis, his work with other artists, as well as his solo career is totalled, Collins had more top 40 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart during the 1980s than any other artist. In 2008, Collins was ranked the 22nd most successful artist on the “The Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists”. Although one of the world’s best-selling recording artists and a highly respected drummer, Collins has garnered significant criticism over the years from music journalists and fellow artists. He announced his retirement in 2011 to focus on his family life, but indicated in 2013 that he was still writing songs and considering a return to music.
Collins was born in Chiswick, Hounslow, Middlesex (now London), the son of Winifred M. “June” (née Strange), a theatrical agent, and Greville Philip Austin Collins, an insurance agent. He was given a toy drum kit for Christmas when he was five. Later, his uncle made him a makeshift one that he used regularly. As Collins grew older, these were followed by more complete sets bought by his parents. He practised by playing to music on the television and radio, but never learned to read and write conventional musical notation; instead, he used a system he devised himself. According to Barbara Speake, founder of the eponymous stage school which he would later attend, Collins always had a rare ear for music: “Phil was always special; aged five he entered a Butlins talent contest singing Davy Crockett, but he stopped the orchestra halfway through to tell them they were in the wrong key.”

As a teenager, Collins went to learn drum rudiments. He learned the basic rudiments under the tuition of Lloyd Ryan and later studied further under Frank King. Collins would recall: “Rudiments I found very, very helpful – much more helpful than anything else because they’re used all the time. In any kind of funk or jazz drumming, the rudiments are always there.” However, Collins regretted that he never mastered musical notation, saying: “I never really came to grips with the music. I should have stuck with it. I’ve always felt that if I could hum it, I could play it. For me, that was good enough, but that attitude is bad.” Lloyd Ryan recalled: “Phil always had a problem with reading. That was always a big problem for him. That’s a shame because reading drum music isn’t that difficult.”

Collins’s particularly strong early influence was The Beatles and their drummer Ringo Starr. He also enthusiastically followed the lesser-known London band The Action, whose drummer he would copy and whose work introduced him to the soul music of Motown and Stax Records. While attending Chiswick County School for Boys, Collins formed a band called The Real Thing and later joined The Freehold. With the latter group, he wrote his first song titled “Lying Crying Dying”. His professional acting training began at the age of 14, when he entered the Barbara Speake Stage School, a fee-paying but non-selective independent school in Acton, London, whose talent agency had been established by his mother.

phil collins
Early career

Collins began a career as a child actor while at the Barbara Speake Stage School and won his first major role as the Artful Dodger in the London production of Oliver!. He was an extra in the famous Beatles comedy film A Hard Day’s Night (1964), as one of the hundreds of screaming teenagers during the TV concert sequence and seen fleetingly in a close-up. He was in Calamity the Cow (1967), made by the Children’s Film Foundation. He was in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) as one of the children who storms the castle at the end of the film, but it was cut. He also auditioned for the role of Romeo in Romeo and Juliet (1968), a role won by fellow Artful Dodger actor Leonard Whiting. Collins was among the last three finalists for the role of I.Q. on the American children’s television show The Bugaloos (he lost out to English actor/musician John McIndoe).

Despite the beginnings of an acting career, Collins continued to gravitate towards music. Collins’s first record deal came as drummer for Hickory, who changed their name to Flaming Youth by the time of their sole album, Ark 2 (1969). A concept album inspired by the recent media attention surrounding the moon landing, Ark 2 (with Ronnie Caryl, Brian Chatton and Gordon “Flash” Smith), failed to make much commercial success despite positive critical reviews. Melody Maker featured the album as “Pop Album of the Month”, describing it as “adult music beautifully played with nice tight harmonies”. The album’s main single, “From Now On”, failed on the radio. After a year of touring, band tensions and the lack of commercial success dissolved the group. In 1970, the 19-year-old Collins played percussion on the George Harrison song “Art of Dying”, released on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison later credited him in the liner notes to the remastered CD version of the album released in 2000.
Genesis era (band):

In 1970, Collins answered a Melody Maker classified ad for “…a drummer sensitive to acoustic music, and 12-string acoustic guitarist”.Genesis placed the advert after having already lost three drummers over two albums. The audition occurred at the home of Peter Gabriel’s parents. Prospective candidates performed tracks from the group’s second album, Trespass (1970). Collins arrived early, listened to the other auditions while swimming in Gabriel’s parents’ pool, and memorised the pieces before his own audition.

Collins won the audition. Nursery Cryme was released a year later. Although his role remained primarily that of drummer and backing vocalist for the next five years, he made his lead singing debut on “For Absent Friends” (from Nursery Cryme). He later sang “More Fool Me” (from Selling England by the Pound).

In 1974, while Genesis were recording the concept album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, Brian Eno (who is credited as “Enossification” for electronic vocal effects on the track “Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging”) needed a drummer for his second solo album Taking Tiger Mountain. Collins was sent to fill the gap, and played drums in lieu of payment for Eno’s work with the band. Collins later contributed drums to the Brian Eno 1975, and 1977 art rock releases Another Green World and Before and After Science.

In 1975, following the final tour supporting the album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, Gabriel left the group to pursue a solo career. Collins became lead vocalist after a lengthy but ultimately fruitless search for Gabriel’s replacement (where he sang back-up with the over 400 hopefuls that reportedly auditioned). To facilitate Collins’s new role as the group’s lead vocalist/frontman, Genesis recruited former Yes and King Crimson drummer Bill Bruford to play drums during live shows, although Collins continued to play drums during longer instrumental sections. Bruford’s drumming can be heard on the track “The Cinema Show” on the live album Seconds Out. Bruford was soon replaced by ex-Frank Zappa band member Chester Thompson, who became a mainstay of the band’s live line-up (as well as Collins’s solo back-up band) through the following decades. Collins, however, continued to be the band’s exclusive drummer on the group’s studio recordings.

The band’s first studio album with Collins as their lead vocalist was 1976’s A Trick of the Tail, which reached the American Top 40, and peaked as high as No. 3 on the UK charts. Rolling Stone wrote that, “Genesis has managed to turn the possible catastrophe of Gabriel’s departure into their first broad-based American success.” Following the recording of Genesis’s next studio album Wind & Wuthering, their guitarist Steve Hackett left the group to pursue his own solo career. The group decided to continue as a trio for recording with Tony Banks on keyboards and Mike Rutherford playing the guitar and bass guitar in the studio, although the line-up was regularly augmented by Chester Thompson and American guitarist Daryl Stuermer for concert tours.

phil collins

Collins simultaneously performed in a jazz fusion group called Brand X. The band recorded their first album, Unorthodox Behaviour, with Collins as drummer, but because Genesis was Collins’s priority, there were several Brand X tours and albums without him. Collins credits Brand X as his first use of a drum machine as well as his first use of a home 8-track tape machine.

Collins also performed on Steve Hackett’s first solo album, 1975’s Voyage of the Acolyte, on which he sang the lead vocals and played drums. As the decade closed, Genesis began to shift from their progressive rock roots and towards a more accessible, radio-friendly pop-rock sound. The 1978 album …And Then There Were Three… featured their first UK Top 10 and US Top 40 single, “Follow You Follow Me”.

“Dance on a Volcano” (1976)
The first track from Genesis’s A Trick of the Tail was Collins’s début as the group’s full-time lead singer. A progressive rock track, it contrasts with the style of his later work.
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In the 1980s, while Collins developed as a songwriter and established a parallel career as a solo artist, Genesis recorded a series of highly successful studio albums including Duke, Abacab, Genesis and Invisible Touch. The latter album’s title track reached number one on the American Billboard singles chart, the only Genesis song to do so. The group received a nomination for the MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year in 1987 for the single “Land of Confusion” (which featured puppet caricatures created by the British satirical team Spitting Image) but lost out to Peter Gabriel’s solo hit, “Sledgehammer”. Reviews were generally positive, with Rolling Stone’s J. D. Considine stating, “every tune is carefully pruned so that each flourish delivers not an instrumental epiphany but a solid hook.”

Collins left Genesis in 1996 to focus on his solo career. The last studio album with him as their lead vocalist was 1991’s We Can’t Dance; it was supported by an extensive tour across the world in 1992. He and Gabriel reunited with other Genesis members in 1999 to re-record “The Carpet Crawlers” for Genesis’s Turn It On Again: The Hits. When in the mid-2000s discussions of a possible Genesis reunion arose, Collins stated that he would prefer to return as the drummer, with Gabriel handling the vocals. Eventually, Turn It On Again: The Tour was announced for 2007, with the Collins/Rutherford/Banks line-up.
1981–1983: Early solo recordings

The dominant theme running through Collins’s early solo recordings (although never specifically mentioned in his songs) was the acrimonious breakdown of his first marriage and then-recent divorce. Two songs he wrote on the Genesis album Duke, “Please Don’t Ask”, and the Top 20 hit “Misunderstanding”, dealt with his failed relationships. A third track that appeared on Duke, “Behind the Lines” can also be found on Collins’s debut solo album, “Face Value”. With the recording of his first solo album, Face Value, Collins attributed his divorce as his main influence, as can be inferred from songs such as “If Leaving Me Is Easy”.

“In the Air Tonight” from Face Value (1981), was the first single of Collins’s solo career.

Collins made his live debut as a solo performer appearing at the invitation of record producer Martin Lewis at the Amnesty International benefit show, The Secret Policeman’s Other Ball at the Theatre Royal in London in September 1981, performing two songs from Face Value including “In the Air Tonight” and “The Roof Is Leaking” accompanying himself on piano. Face Value became a surprise international success, topping the charts in at least seven countries and hitting the top ten of the Billboard 200 eventually going quintuple-platinum in the US. Hits from the album included “In the Air Tonight”, “I Missed Again”, and “If Leaving Me Is Easy”.

Much like Face Value, many of the songs from Collins’s 1982 follow-up album, Hello, I Must Be Going!, came from Collins’s marital problems with his first wife such as “I Don’t Care Anymore” and “Do You Know, Do You Care”. Collins’s early albums had a dark presence, usually heavy on the drums. Regarding Face Value, he says, “I had a wife, two children, two dogs, and the next day I didn’t have anything. So a lot of these songs were written because I was going through these emotional changes.” There were occasional poppier influences—Face Value’s “Behind the Lines”, for example, was a jazzy remake of a Genesis song he co-wrote. Hello, I Must Be Going! gave him a UK number one for his cover of The Supremes’ “You Can’t Hurry Love”. The album went triple-platinum in the United States. The Supremes’ cover was his first Top 10 US hit (it also hit the Top 10 of Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart). The album also reached number two on the UK Albums Chart, spending well over a year there.

phil collins

Two years before, Collins had played drums on Peter Gabriel’s third self-titled record (often referred to as Melt), the first record to feature the “gated reverb” sound, which was used on the song “Intruder”. Gabriel reportedly “didn’t want any metal on the record” and asked Collins to leave his cymbals at home, to concentrate on the sound of his kit more heavily than usual. Studio engineer Hugh Padgham augmented the drum sound by using a microphone normally intended for studio communication rather than recording and feeding it through a signal processor called a noise gate. This allowed the reverberation added to the drums to be suddenly cut off before it naturally decayed. The result was the arresting “gated reverb” which became Collins’s signature sound. This was the same ‘big drum sound’ used on such songs as “In the Air Tonight”, “Mama” by Genesis, and Anni-Frid “Frida” Lyngstad’s “I Know There’s Something Going On”.
1984–1991: Mid-career – Massive worldwide success

“Against All Odds” from the soundtrack of the same name (1984), is a piano-driven ballad.

“Another Day in Paradise”
A sample of “Another Day in Paradise” from …But Seriously (1989). The ballad was written to bring attention to the problem of homelessness.
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Collins changed his musical style with the release of the ballad, “Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)”, which was the main theme song for the movie of the same name in 1984. The more pop-friendly and radio-accessible single became Collins’s first solo single to reach number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 and gave him his first Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male. Later that year, Collins contributed to production on Earth, Wind & Fire vocalist Phillip Bailey’s third solo album, Chinese Wall, collaborating with Bailey on the hit duet, “Easy Lover”. In November 1984, Collins contributed vocals and drums to Band Aid’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”, a song written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure to raise funds for the victims of the 1983–85 famine in Ethiopia, which became the Christmas number one in the UK and the best-selling single in UK Singles Chart history, selling a million copies in the first week alone. Collins released his most successful album, the Diamond-certified No Jacket Required, which reached number one in US in the summer of 1985. It contained the US number one hits “One More Night” and “Sussudio” as well as the top ten hits “Don’t Lose My Number” and “Take Me Home”. It also contains the lesser known yet equally robust “Who Said I Would”, and “Only You Know and I Know”. The album featured contributions from The Police’s vocalist, Sting, ex-bandmate Peter Gabriel, and Helen Terry as backing vocalists. He also recorded the successful song “Separate Lives”, a duet with Marilyn Martin, and a US number one, for the movie White Nights.[54] Collins had three US number-one songs in 1985, the most by any artist that year. No Jacket Required went on to win three Grammy Awards including Album of the Year.

No Jacket Required received criticism that the album was too commercial, despite its favorable reviews by the majority of music critics. A positive review by David Fricke of Rolling Stone ended, “After years on the art-rock fringe, Collins has established himself firmly in the middle of the road. Perhaps he should consider testing himself and his new fans’ expectations next time around.” The album went straight to No. 1 in the US and UK. In 1985, Collins was invited by Bob Geldof to perform at the Live Aid charity event, which was a continuation of the fundraising effort for Ethiopia started by Band Aid. Collins had the distinction of being the only performer to appear at both the UK concert at Wembley Stadium and the US concert at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia; he performed his solo songs “Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)” and “In the Air Tonight”. He accomplished this by performing early in the day at Wembley as both a solo artist and alongside Sting, then transferring to a Concorde flight to the US enabling him to perform his solo material, and play the drums with Led Zeppelin and Eric Clapton in Philadelphia. While being a guest on many major artists’ hit recordings, Collins continued to enjoy solo success even while on tour with Genesis supporting their successful album Invisible Touch. Besides his number-one duet with Marilyn Martin in 1985, Collins would score two more hits from movies with the singles, “A Groovy Kind of Love” (No. 1 UK, No. 1 US) and “Two Hearts” (No. 1 US, No. 6 UK), both from the soundtrack of his feature film, Buster. In 1986, Collins won the first two of his six Brit Awards for Best British Male and Best British Album for No Jacket Required.

Collins spent most of 1989 working on his fourth studio album …But Seriously. He also found time to appear as a guest artist on The Who Tour 1989, performing the role of young Tommy’s wicked Uncle Ernie in a reprisal of the rock opera Tommy (a part originally played by their late drummer, Keith Moon). In November, Collins released …But Seriously, which became another huge success, featuring as its lead single the anti-homelessness anthem “Another Day in Paradise”, with David Crosby singing backing vocals. “Another Day in Paradise” reached number one on the Billboard charts at the end of 1989, won Collins Best British Single at the Brit Awards in 1990, and the Grammy Award for Record of the Year in 1991; it was also one of the most successful singles of all time in Germany. In the process, it became the last No. 1 US pop hit of the 1980s. The album …But Seriously became the first No. 1 US album of the 1990s and the best-selling album of 1990 in the UK. Other songs included “Something Happened on the Way to Heaven” (No. 4 US, No. 15 UK), “Do You Remember?” (not released in the UK, but a No. 4 hit in the US), and “I Wish It Would Rain Down” (the latter featuring Eric Clapton on guitar; No. 3 US, No. 7 UK). Songs about apartheid and homelessness demonstrated Collins’s turn to politically driven material. This theme recurred on his later albums. A live album, Serious Hits… Live!, followed, which reached the top ten around the world. In September 1990, Collins performed “Sussudio” at the 1990 MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles. Collins also played drums on the 1989 Tears for Fears hit single, “Woman in Chains”.
1992–2008: Later solo work and Genesis reunion
Collins performing at a Genesis concert in Knebworth, England in 1992.

After a hiatus of five years, Genesis reconvened for the 1991 album release We Can’t Dance, which was to be Collins’s last studio album with the group. The album features the hit singles “Jesus He Knows Me”, “I Can’t Dance”, “No Son of Mine” and “Hold on My Heart”. In 1992 Collins toured with Genesis on the We Can’t Dance Tour where they played to stadiums around the world, including Giants Stadium in New Jersey.[66] At the 1993 American Music Awards on 25 January, Genesis won the award for Favorite Pop/Rock Band, Duo, or Group.

Collins’s record sales began to drop with the 1993 release of Both Sides, a largely experimental album that, according to Collins, included songs that “were becoming so personal, so private, I didn’t want anyone else’s input”. Featuring a less polished sound and fewer up-tempo songs than his previous albums, Both Sides was a significant departure. Collins used no backing musicians, and he performed all the vocal and instrumental parts at his home studio, and used rough vocal takes for the final product. The album was not as well received by radio. Its two biggest hits were “Both Sides of the Story” and “Everyday”. Collins worked on the album completely independently of his record company, and took them by surprise when he delivered them a completed album that they were unaware he was making.[citation needed]
Collins performing live at the Umbria Jazz Festival, in Perugia, Italy, 1996

Collins officially parted ways with Genesis in 1996 to focus on his solo career (Genesis would produce one album without Collins—…Calling All Stations…—before going on hiatus). Collins attempted a return to pop music with Dance into the Light, which Entertainment Weekly reviewed by saying that “even Phil Collins must know that we all grew weary of Phil Collins”. It included minor hits such as the title track and The Beatles-inspired “It’s in Your Eyes”. Although the album achieved Gold certification in the US, it sold considerably less than his previous albums. Despite this, the subsequent tour regularly sold out arenas.[citation needed]

In 1996, Collins formed the Phil Collins Big Band. With Collins as drummer, the band performed jazz renditions of various Collins and Genesis hits. The Phil Collins Big Band did a world tour in 1998 that included a performance at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In 1999, the group released the CD A Hot Night in Paris including big band versions of “Invisible Touch”, “Sussudio”, and the more obscure “The Los Endos Suite” from A Trick of the Tail. On 15 September 1997, Collins appeared at the Music for Montserrat concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London, performing alongside artists such as Sting, Mark Knopfler, Elton John, Eric Clapton and Paul McCartney.[70]
Collins’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, 6834 Hollywood Boulevard

A compilation album …Hits was released in 1998 and sold very well, returning Collins to multi-platinum status in the US. The album’s sole new track, a cover of the Cyndi Lauper hit “True Colors”, received considerable airplay on US Adult Contemporary stations while peaking at No. 2.[71] Some of Collins’s earlier hits (e.g. “I Missed Again”, “If Leaving Me Is Easy”, etc.) and other successes were not included on the compilation.[citation needed]

Collins’s next single, “You’ll Be in My Heart”, from the Disney animated movie Tarzan, spent 19 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart—the longest time ever up to that point. The song won Collins an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award both for Best Original Song. It was his third nomination in the songwriters’ category, after being nominated in 1985 and 1989. Collins was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, on 16 June 1999.[72]
Collins performing live in Barcelona, Spain, in July 2004

In 2002, Collins released Testify. Metacritic’s roundup of album reviews found this record to be the worst-reviewed album at the time of its release, though it has since been “surpassed” by three more recent releases. The album’s single “Can’t Stop Loving You” (a Leo Sayer cover) was yet another No. 1 Adult Contemporary smash hit for Collins. Testify sold 140,000 copies in the United States by year’s end, although a successful worldwide tour followed.

That same year, Collins accepted an invitation to drum for the “house band” at a concert celebrating Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee. In 2003, he announced his last solo tour—the “First Final Farewell Tour”, a tongue-in-cheek reference to the multiple farewell tours of other popular artists.In 2006, he worked with Disney on a Broadway production of Tarzan.
Collins performing live with Genesis at the Wachovia Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US, September 2007

After much speculation regarding a Genesis reunion, Collins reunited with Banks and Rutherford and announced Turn It On Again: The Tour on 7 November 2006, nearly 40 years after the band first formed. The tour took place during summer 2007, and played in twelve countries across Europe, followed by a second leg in North America. During the tour Genesis performed at the Live Earth concert at Wembley Stadium, London. Following the band’s performance, presenter Jonathan Ross had to apologise to viewers watching the televised version as Collins had used a swear word while singing “Invisible Touch”. In 2007, the band were honourees at the second annual VH1 Rock Honors, with the band performing “Turn It On Again”, “No Son of Mine” and “Los Endos” at the ceremony in Las Vegas.
2009–present: Going Back, retirement, Alamo collection

In October 2009, it was reported that Collins was to record a Motown covers album. He told a German newspaper, “I want the songs to sound exactly like the originals”, and that the album would feature up to 30 songs. In January 2010, Chester Thompson said that the album had been completed and would be released some time soon. He also revealed that Collins managed to play the drums on the album despite the adverse effects of his recent spinal operation. It was the first solo album Collins had recorded which consisted entirely of songs written by other artists.

phil collins

Going Back was released on 13 September 2010, entering the UK charts at number 4, rising to number one the following week.In early summer 2010, Collins played six concerts entirely dedicated to the music from Going Back. These included a special programme, Phil Collins: One Night Only, which was broadcast on ITV1 on 18 September 2010. Collins also promoted Going Back with his first and only appearance on the BBC’s foremost music series Later… with Jools Holland, broadcast on 17 September 2010.

In March 2010, Collins was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Genesis at a ceremony in New York. As of January 2011, Collins has spent 1,730 weeks in the German music charts—766 weeks of them with Genesis albums and singles and 964 weeks with solo releases.

On 4 March 2011, citing health problems and other concerns, Collins announced that he was taking time off from his career, prompting widespread reports of his retirement. Days later, on 7 March, his UK representative told the press, “He is not, has no intention of, retiring.” However, later that day, Collins posted a message to his fans on his own website, confirming his intention to retire to focus on his family life.

In July 2012, Collins’s greatest hits collection …Hits re-entered the US charts, reaching number 6 on the Billboard 200.

In November 2013, Collins told German media that he was considering a return to music and speculated that this could mean further live shows with Genesis, stating: “Everything is possible. We could tour in Australia and South America. We haven’t been there yet.” Speaking to reporters in Miami, Florida in December 2013 at an event promoting his charity work, Collins indicated that he was writing music once again and might tour again, though he did not relish being subjected to the harsh critical reception his music has received over the years if he did decide to return to the studio and stage.

In the early 2010s, Collins had become involved with researching the Battle of the Alamo in Texas, United States, including authoring a book .

On 24 January 2014, Collins announced in an interview with Inside South Florida that he was writing new compositions with the English musician Adele. He said that “I’ve just started to work with Adele.” Collins told the publication that he had no idea who Adele was when he first learned she wanted to collaborate with him. He said “I wasn’t actually too aware [of her]. I live in a cave.” Collins then agreed to join her in the studio after hearing her voice. Collins said that “[She] achieved an incredible amount. I really love her voice. I love some of this stuff she’s done, too.” However, in September 2014, Collins revealed that the collaboration had ended and he said it had been “a bit of a non-starter”.

In May 2014, Collins gave a live performance of “In the Air Tonight” and “Land of Confusion” with young student musicians at the Miami Country Day School in Miami, Florida. Collins was asked to perform there by his sons, who are students at the school. In August 2014, Collins was reported to have accepted an invitation to perform at a benefit concert in Miami in aid of his Little Dreams Foundation charity which is due to take place in December.
Drums and other equipment

Collins uses Gretsch drums and Sabian cymbals. Drums (all single headed concert toms except for the snare): 20″ Bass Drum, 18″ Floor Tom, 16″ Floor Tom, 15″ Mounted Tom, 12″ Tom, 10″ Tom, 8″ Tom, 14″x4″ Snare, 14″ Phil Collins Special.

Cymbals: HH Medium Crash 20″ – HH Extra Thin Crash 17″ – Hi-Hats 15″ – HH China 20″ – HH Medium-Thin Crash 16″ -HH China 22″ – HH Raw Bell Dry Ride 21″.

Until 1986, Collins played Paiste and Zildjian cymbals. Other drums he has used over the years are Premier, Noble & Cooley, Pearl, Fibes and Simmons electronic drums. He uses a Ludwig Speed King pedal, Gibraltar hardware, Pro-Mark sticks and Remo drumheads. Collins plays his kit left-handed and also has his Pro-Mark Phil Collins signature drum stick.[citation needed]

Other instruments which have become synonymous with Collins’s sound (particularly in his post-1978 Genesis and subsequent solo career) include the Roland CR-78, Roland TR-808, Roland TR-909, Linn LM-1 and LinnDrum drum machines, Sequential Circuits Prophet-5 synthesizer,[96] the Yamaha CP-70 electric grand piano, the Yamaha DX7 synthesizer, Oberheim DMX drum machine (as heard on “Sussudio”), Korg Wavestation, Korg KARMA, Korg Trinity,[97] Korg 01/W and Korg Triton synthesizers, the Roland D-50, Roland JD-800 and Roland JV-1080 synthesizers, E-mu SP-12 and E-mu SP-1200 sampling drum machines and the Roland VP-330 vocoder (as heard on “In the Air Tonight”).[citation needed]
Career as record producer and guest musician

For his solo career and his career with Genesis, Collins produced or co-produced virtually all of his singles and albums, the notable exceptions being “Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)” (produced by Arif Mardin), and his cover of “True Colors” (produced by Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds).[citation needed]

Collins also maintained a career as a producer for other artists throughout the 1980s, usually working on outside projects at the rate of one artist per year. His first outside work as a producer was the 1981 album Glorious Fool for John Martyn; in 1979 he had played drums and contributed backing vocals on Martyn’s Grace and Danger. He followed that up by producing Anni-Frid “Frida” Lyngstad’s (Frida Lyngstad of ABBA) 1982 album Something’s Going On, which contained the international hit “I Know There’s Something Going On”.[citation needed]

Collins played drums on Robert Plant’s solo albums Pictures at Eleven and The Principle of Moments.[citation needed]

In 1983, Collins produced two tracks for Adam Ant, on which he also played drums, both of which hit the UK charts: “Puss ‘N’ Boots” and “Strip”. “Strip” was a minor US hit as well.[citation needed]

In 1984, he produced Phillip Bailey’s album Chinese Wall, from which the hit Bailey/Collins duet “Easy Lover” was drawn. This album also contained the Bailey hit “Walking on the Chinese Wall”.[citation needed]

In 1985, Collins produced and played drums on several tracks on the Eric Clapton album Behind the Sun. The following year, he produced (in collaboration with Hugh Padgham) one track for Howard Jones, the international hit “No One Is to Blame”, for which he also played drums.

Returning to work with Clapton, Collins was one of the producers on his 1987 album August. The UK top 20 single “Behind the Mask” was drawn from this album, and this particular track credited production to “Phil Collins in association with Tom Dowd.”[citation needed]

In 1988, Collins and Lamont Dozier collaborated as writers and producers of The Four Tops top 10 UK hit “Loco in Acapulco”, which was taken from the soundtrack of the film Buster, in which Collins starred. Finally, in 1989, Collins was one of the producers of the Stephen Bishop album Bowling in Paris, which included the US Adult Contemporary hit “Walking on Air”, produced by Collins and Padgham.[citation needed]

Collins co-wrote, sang and played on the song “Hero” on David Crosby’s 1993 album Thousand Roads.[citation needed]
Films, theatre, and television

The majority of Collins’s film work has been through music. Four of his seven American number-one songs came from film soundtracks, and his work on Disney’s Tarzan earned him an Oscar. Collins even sang German, Italian, Spanish and French versions of the Tarzan soundtrack for the respective film versions. Collins’s acting career has been brief. As a child, he appeared in three films, although two of the films were for brief moments as an extra.[citation needed]

Collins wrote and performed the title song to Against All Odds in 1984. The song became the first of his seven American number-one songs and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Song. Collins was not invited to perform the song at that year’s presentation, although he was in the audience as the song’s composer. Collins had arranged his US tour to accommodate the possibility of appearing on the telecast in the event his song was nominated for an Oscar. It is believed that the producers of that year’s Academy Awards show were not aware of his prominence as a musical performer. A note to Collins’s label from telecast co-producer Larry Gelbart explaining the lack of invitation stated, “Thank you for your note regarding Phil Cooper [sic]. I’m afraid the spots have already been filled”. Collins instead watched Ann Reinking perform his song.[98] For a long time afterwards, he would introduce his performance of “Against All Odds” at his concerts by saying: “Miss Ann Reinking’s not here tonight, so I guess I’ll have to sing my own song”.[citation needed]

As a lead vocalist, Collins sang Stephen Bishop’s composition “Separate Lives” for the film White Nights (1985) as a duet with Marilyn Martin. The single of the recording became another number-one hit for Collins. The song itself was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song (a category that honours composers, not vocalists). Bishop’s song had parallels to some of those on Collins’s first two albums. Writer Stephen Bishop noted that he was inspired by a failed relationship and called “Separate Lives” “a song about anger”.[99] When the song was being nominated for an Academy Award, in interviews about the original snub by the Academy for “Against All Odds”, Collins would jokingly say “the hell with him – I’m going up too,” referring to if Bishop’s song were to win the award.

Collins’s first film role since embarking on his career as a musician came in 1988 with the romantic comedy-drama Buster. He starred as Buster Edwards, a criminal convicted for his role in the Great Train Robbery, which took place in England in August 1963. Reviews for the film were mixed and controversy ensued over its subject matter, with Prince Charles and Princess Diana deciding to withdraw from attending the film’s première after it was accused of glorifying crime.[101] However, Collins’s performance opposite Julie Walters received good reviews and he contributed four songs to the film’s soundtrack. His slow ballad rendition of “A Groovy Kind of Love”, originally a 1966 single by The Mindbenders, became Collins’s only single to reach number one in both the UK and the US. The film also spawned the hit single “Two Hearts”, which he wrote in collaboration with legendary Motown songwriter Lamont Dozier; the two artists would go on to win a Golden Globe for Best Original Song and receive an Oscar nomination in the same category, the second such honour for Collins; “Big Noise”, written by Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier, which included Collins on the lead vocals (although the song was not released as a single, an instrumental version of this song appeared as the B-side to the single version of “A Groovy Kind of Love”). The final song, “Loco in Acapulco”, was another collaboration between him and Dozier, with the vocals performed by the legendary Motown group The Four Tops. Film critic Roger Ebert said the role of Buster was “played with surprising effectiveness” by Collins, although the film’s soundtrack proved more successful than the film did.

Collins had cameo appearances in Steven Spielberg’s Hook (1991) and the AIDS docudrama And the Band Played On (1993). He starred in 1993’s Frauds, which competed for the Palme d’Or at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival. He supplied voices to two animated features: Amblin’s Balto (1995) and Disney’s The Jungle Book 2 (2003). A long-discussed but never completed project was a film titled The Three Bears; originally meant to star him alongside Danny DeVito and Bob Hoskins, he often mentioned the film, though an appropriate script never materialised.

Collins performed the soundtrack to the animated film Tarzan (1999) for The Walt Disney Company. Collins won an Academy Award for “You’ll Be in My Heart”, which he performed at that year’s telecast as well as during a Disney-themed Super Bowl halftime show. The song, which he also recorded in Spanish among other languages, became his only appearance on the Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart.[71] Disney hired him, along with Tina Turner, in 2003 for the soundtrack to another animated feature film, Brother Bear, and had some airplay with the song “Look Through My Eyes”.

Collins’s music is featured in the satirical black comedy film American Psycho, with psychotic lead character Patrick Bateman (played by Christian Bale) portrayed as an obsessive fan who reads deep meaning into his work, especially with Genesis, while describing his solo music as “more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way”. Bateman delivers a monologue in praise of Collins and Genesis during a sequence in which he engages the services of two prostitutes while playing “In Too Deep” and “Sussudio”. Bateman also makes similar paeans to other 1980s pop stars Huey Lewis and the News and Whitney Houston in the film.

On television, he twice hosted the Billboard Music Awards. He also appeared in an episode of the series Miami Vice, entitled “Phil the Shill”, in which he plays a cheating con-man. He also guest starred in several sketches with The Two Ronnies. Most recently, he had a cameo appearance on the television series Whoopi.

In 2001, Collins was sought out by the satirist Chris Morris, and appeared in the Brass Eye “Paedophilia Special” endorsing a spoof charity called ‘Nonce Sense’. At one point Collins, dressed in a matching baseball cap and t-shirt emblazoned with the name of this fictitious charity, stares into the camera and declares: “I’m talking Nonce-sense.”

phil collins

In 2003, Collins’s work on Brother Bear was expanded as Disney used the song “Welcome” as the theme for Walt Disney’s Parade of Dreams, the main parade celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Disneyland.

In 2005 Disney’s Tarzan was adapted for Broadway. Collins contributed 11 new songs and instrumental pieces, and was deeply involved in the production. Unlike the film, where Collins sang all the material, the characters sang on stage.

Collins made an appearance as himself in the 2006 PSP and PS2 video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories. Set in 1984, he appears in three missions in which the main character, Victor, must save him from a gang that is trying to kill him, the final mission occurring during his concert, where the player must defend the scaffolding against saboteurs while Collins is simultaneously performing “In the Air Tonight”. After this, the player is given the opportunity to watch this performance of “In the Air Tonight” for only 6,000 dollars in the game. “In the Air Tonight” was also featured in the soundtrack of Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories and it was also featured in the film Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film For Theaters, the 2009 movie The Hangover and the 2007 Gorilla commercial for Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate. The advertisement also helped the song re-enter the New Zealand RIANZ Singles Chart at number three in July 2008, the following week reaching number one, beating its original 1981 No. 6 peak. “In the Air Tonight” was also sampled in the song “I Can Feel It” (on which Collins was credited as a featured artist) on Sean Kingston’s self-titled debut album.

Collins was portrayed in the cartoon South Park in the episode “Timmy 2000” holding his Oscar throughout, referring to his 1999 win for “You’ll Be in My Heart”, which defeated “Blame Canada” from South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut. He was seen again in the episode “Cartman’s Silly Hate Crime 2000”. Collins appears briefly in the Finnish animated sitcom Pasila in the episode “Phil Collins Hangover”. The music of this episode is a pastiche of Phil Collins’s “Another Day in Paradise”.Phil Collins was mentioned in the Psych episode “Disco Didn’t Die. It Was Murdered!” as resembling Shawn Spencer’s father Henry portrayed by actor Corbin Bernsen.

Sergio Mendes – Never Gonna Let You Go – Live Performance

 

Sergio Mendes,

Sérgio Santos Mendes ( born February 11, 1941 in Niterói, Brazil) is a Brazilian musician. He has over 55 releases, and plays bossa nova heavily crossed with jazz and funk. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2012 as co-writer of the song “Real In Rio” from the animated film Rio.

Mendes is married to Gracinha Leporace, who has performed with him since the early 1970s. He has collaborated with many artists through the years, including the Black Eyed Peas, with whom he re-recorded in 2006 a version of his original breakthrough hit “Mas Que Nada”.
The child of a physician in Niterói, Brazil, Mendes attended the local conservatory with hopes of becoming a classical pianist. As his interest in jazz grew, he started playing in nightclubs in the late 1950s just as bossa nova, a jazz-inflected derivative of samba, was emerging. Mendes played with Antonio Carlos Jobim (regarded as a mentor) and many U.S. jazz musicians who toured Brazil.

Mendes formed the Sexteto Bossa Rio and recorded Dance Moderno in 1961. Touring Europe and the United States, Mendes recorded albums with Cannonball Adderley and Herbie Mann and played Carnegie Hall. Mendes moved to the U.S. in 1964 and cut two albums under the Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’65 group name with Capitol Records and Atlantic Records.

sergio mendes

Sergio became full partners with Richard Adler, a Brooklyn-born American who had previously brought Bossa Trés plus two dancers, Joe Bennett and a Brazilian partner, to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show, in 1963. He was also accompanied by Antonio Carlos Jobim; Flavio Ramos, and Aloisio Olivera, a record and TV producer from Rio. The Musicians Union only allowed this group to appear on one TV show and one club appearance (Basin Street East) before ordering them to leave the U.S. When the new group, Brasil ’65 was formed, Shelly Manne, Bud Shank and other West Coast musicians got Sergio and the others into the local musicians union. Adler and Mendes formed Brasil ’65, which consisted of Wanda Sá and Rosinha de Valença, as well as the Sergio Mendes Trio. The group recorded albums for Atlantic and Capitol.
Brasil ’66

All the early Brasil ’66 albums and Mendes’ jazz albums for Atlantic Records, through Nesuhi and Ahmet Ertegun, had low sales, but were considered creative. Richard Adler suggested that Mendes and the group sing in English, as well as the Portuguese that Mendes had demanded, and Adler sought new English-based material including “Going Out Of My Head” by Teddy Randazzo and Bobby Weinstein, “The Look Of Love” by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and “Fool On The Hill” by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. In order to sing these songs properly in English, Adler suggested that the group find two American girl singers, who would then be bi-lingual on any future recordings. Adler then went to the Ertegun Brothers at Atlantic Records and sought to have them release Mendes from his Atlantic Jazz contract. Ahmed agreed to release Sergio from his existing contract and allow him to record with A&M. Mendes was not at this meeting, only Adler and Ahmet Ertegun. After Lani Hall and Janice Hansen proved to strengthen the previous Mendes’ all-Brazilian group, Adler called Jerry Dennon, a friend of both Adler, Alpert and Moss, and arranged for an audition, and A&M Records then signed Brasil ’66 to a recording contract. Alpert took over as producer, and the group became a huge success.

Due to tepid sales, he replaced his Brazilian-born vocalist Wanda de Sá with the distinctive voice of Chicago native Lani Hall (who learned Mendes’ Portuguese material phonetically), switched to Herb Alpert’s A&M label, and released Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66, an album that went platinum based largely on the success of the single “Mas Que Nada” (a Jorge Ben cover) and the personal support of Alpert, with whom Mendes toured regularly.

The original lineup of Brasil ’66 was Mendes (piano), vocalists Lani Hall and Bibi Vogel (later replaced by Janis Hansen), Bob Matthews (bass), José Soares (percussion) and João Palma (drums). John Pisano guested as guitarist. This new line-up including Hansen then recorded two more albums between 1966–1968 (including the best-selling Look Around LP), before there was a major personnel change for their fourth album Fool on the Hill.[1]

Karen Philipp replaced Hansen as the second female vocalist, while veteran drummer Dom Um Romão teamed with Rubens Bassini to assume percussionist duties. Claudio Slon joined the group as drummer in 1969, and played with Mendes for nearly a decade. Sebastiao Neto was the new bassist and Oscar Castro-Neves, the guitarist. This line-up had a more orchestrated and big band sound than its predecessors. Most significantly, in the early 1970s, lead singer Hall pursued a solo career and became Alpert’s second wife.[1] Some accounts claim that Mendes was upset with Alpert for years for “stealing” Hall away from his group.

Though his early singles with Brasil ’66 (most notably “Mas Que Nada”) met with some success, Mendes really burst into mainstream prominence when he performed the Oscar-nominated “The Look of Love” on the Academy Awards telecast in April 1968. Brasil ’66’s version of the song quickly shot into the top 10, peaking at #4 and eclipsing Dusty Springfield’s version from the soundtrack of the movie, Casino Royale. Mendes spent the rest of 1968 enjoying consecutive top 10 and top 20 hits with his follow-up singles, “The Fool on the Hill” and “Scarborough Fair.” From 1968 on, Mendes was arguably the biggest Brazilian star in the world[1] and enjoyed immense popularity worldwide, performing in venues as varied as stadium arenas and the White House, where he gave concerts for both Presidents Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Nixon. The Brasil ’66 group appeared at the World Expo in Osaka, Japan in June 1970.

sergio mendes
Middle career

Mendes’ career in the U.S. stalled in the mid-1970s, but he remained very popular in South America and Japan. His two albums with Bell Records in 1973 and 1974 followed by several for Elektra from 1975 on, found Mendes continuing to mine the best in American pop music and post-Bossa writers of his native Brazil, while forging new directions in soul with collaborators like Stevie Wonder, who wrote Mendes’ R&B-inflected minor hit, “The Real Thing.”

In 1983, he rejoined Alpert’s A&M records and enjoyed huge success with a self-titled album and several follow-up albums, all of which received considerable adult contemporary airplay with charting singles. “Never Gonna Let You Go”, featuring vocals by Joe Pizzulo and Leza Miller, equalled the success of his 1968 single “The Look of Love” by reaching No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart; it also spent four weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart. In 1984 he recorded the “Confetti” album, which had the hit songs “Olympia”, which was also used as a theme song for the Olympic games that year and “Alibis”. The ’80s also found Mendes working with singer Lani Hall again on the song “No Place to Hide” from the Brasil ’86 album, and as producer for her vocals on the title song for the James Bond film Never Say Never Again.

By the timeSergio Mendes released his Grammy-winning Elektra album Brasileiro in 1992, he was the undisputed master of pop-inflected Brazilian jazz. The late-1990s lounge music revival brought retrospection and respect to Mendes’ oeuvre, particularly the classic Brasil ’66 albums.

sergio mendes
Later career

Timeless features a wide array of neo-soul and alternative hip hop guest artists, including The Black Eyed Peas, Erykah Badu, Black Thought, Jill Scott, Chali 2na of Jurassic 5, India.Arie, John Legend, Justin Timberlake, Q-Tip, Stevie Wonder and Pharoahe Monch. It was released February 14, 2006 by Concord Records.

The 2006 re-recorded version of “Mas Que Nada” with The Black Eyed Peas had additional vocals by Gracinha Leporace (Mendes’ wife); this version is included on Timeless. In Brazil, the song is also well known for being the theme song for the local television channel Globo’s Estrelas. The Black Eyed Peas’ version contains a sample of their 2004 hit “Hey Mama”. The re-recorded song became popular on many European charts. On the UK Singles Chart, the song entered at No. 29 and rose to and peaked at No. 6 on its second week on the chart.

Sergio Mendes.

Usher – U Got It Bad

Usher – U Got It Bad

Usher Raymond IV (born October 14, 1978) is an American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actor. He rose to fame in the late 1990s with the release of his second album My Way, which spawned his first U.S. Billboard Hot 100 number-one hit, “Nice & Slow”. The album has been certified 6-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). His follow-up album, 8701, produced the Billboard Hot 100 number one hits “U Remind Me” and “U Got It Bad“.

Usher’s 2004 album, Confessions, established him as one of the best-selling musical artist of the 2000s decade. It sold over 20 million copies worldwide, bolstered by its four consecutive Billboard Hot 100 number one hits — “Yeah!”, “Burn”, “Confessions Part II”, and “My Boo” — and has been certified diamond by the RIAA. His follow-ups, Here I Stand (2008) and Raymond v. Raymond (2010), debuted atop the Billboard 200 and produced the Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles “Love in This Club” and “OMG”. A follow-up EP, Versus, was released in July 2010 and produced the successful track “DJ Got Us Fallin’ in Love”. His seventh studio album, Looking 4 Myself (2012), contained a more dance-pop sound and experienced lower first week sales compared to his previous efforts.

The RIAA ranks Usher as one of the best-selling artists in American music history, having sold over 23 million copies in the United States alone. To date, he has sold over 65 million records worldwide, making him one of the best selling music artists of all time. Usher has won numerous awards including eight Grammy Awards. At the end of 2009, Usher was named the number one Hot 100 artist of the 2000s decade. Billboard named him the second most successful artist of the 2000s decade, with his 2004 album Confessions being ranked as the top solo album of the 2000s decade. Billboard also placed Usher at number six on their list of Top 50 R&B Hip-Hop Artists of the Past 25 Years.Usher has attained nine Hot 100 number-one hits (all as a lead artist) and has attained eighteen Hot 100 top-ten hits.

usher

Usher was born in Dallas, Texas, the son of Jonetta Patton (née O’Neal) from Tennessee and Usher Raymond III. Usher spent the majority of his young life in Chattanooga: his father left the family when Usher was a year old. Usher grew up with his mother, then-stepfather, and half-brother, James Lackey, born in 1984. Directed by his mother, Usher joined the local church youth choir in Chattanooga, when he was nine years old; there, his grandmother discovered his ability to sing, although it was not until Usher joined a singing group that she considered he could sing professionally. In the belief that a bigger city would provide greater opportunities for showcasing his talent, Usher’s family moved to Atlanta, Georgia, where there was a more conducive environment for beginning singers.While in Atlanta, Usher attended North Springs High School. Usher’s father died of a heart attack on January 21, 2008.
Career
1987–96: Musical beginnings and Usher

At age 11, Usher joined an R&B local quintet called the NuBeginnings, which was organized by local music svengali, Darryl Wheeler. Usher recorded 10 songs with the group in 1991, and the ensuing album, Nubeginning Featuring Usher Raymond IV, was only made available regionally and by mail order. However, Patton took him out because, according to her, it was a “bad experience”. The album was re-released nationally in April 2002 by Hip-O Records.

At age 13, Usher competed on Star Search, where he was spotted by an A&R representative from LaFace Records, who arranged an audition for Usher with L.A. Reid, the co-founder of LaFace; Reid signed Usher to a contract with the record company. Usher’s mother left her job as a medical technician to manage his career, but later broke-up their relationship as manager-client in May 2007. Usher was introduced on “Call Me a Mack”, a song he recorded for the soundtrack album to the 1993 drama-romance film Poetic Justice.

On August 30, 1994, LaFace released Usher’s self-titled debut album. Sean “P Diddy” Combs produced several of the tracks and co-executive produced the album. Usher peaked at number twenty-five on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart and was accompanied by three singles: “Can U Get wit It”, “Think of You”, and “The Many Ways”. The album has sold over 500,000 copies, to date.

After graduating from high school, Usher continued to develop his skills as a stage performer and laid the groundwork for his second album. He also appeared on their version of “Let’s Straighten It Out”, a 1995 duet with fellow Atlanta teen recording artist Monica; and on “Dreamin'”, from LaFace’s 1996 Olympic Games benefit album Rhythm of the Games. He was also featured on “I Swear I’m In Love” off the 1996 Kazaam soundtrack.
1997–2003: My Way and 8701

Usher developed a friendship with American record producer, Jermaine Dupri, with whom he co-wrote and produced several tracks for his second album, My Way, released on September 16, 1997. The album’s lead single, “You Make Me Wanna…”, reached number one in the United Kingdom, becoming Usher’s first record to be top single; the record led to his popularity reaching in the country. It also became Usher’s first gold- and platinum-certified single in the United States. The album’s second single, “Nice & Slow”, peaked in January 1998 at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, giving Usher his first US number-one single. Later in February of the same year, the single was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America; My Way has been certified six-time platinum in the United States.

“You Make Me Wanna” won the Best Male R&B Soul Single at the 1999 Soul Train Music Awards.[34] In the closing months of 1997, Usher embarked on a series of tour engagements including a spot on Puffy’s No Way Out tour, dates with Mary J. Blige, and the opening spot on Janet Jackson’s The Velvet Rope Tour. Usher’s first concert album, Live, was released in 1999, which featured appearances by Lil’ Kim, Jagged Edge, Trey Lorenz, Shanice, Twista and Manuel Seal; the album has been certified gold in the United States.

usher

Usher made his acting debut on the UPN television series Moesha, which resulted in a recurring role on the series and subsequently his first film role in 1998’s The Faculty. Usher’s extracurricular activities outside of the recording industry gathered momentum over the following year as he was cast in the soap opera, The Bold and the Beautiful.[19][27] He completed two more films, She’s All That, and his first starring role in Light It Up. He also appeared in the Disney TV movie “Geppetto”.

Usher’s third studio album, originally titled All About U, was slated to be released in early 2001. The first single, “Pop Ya Collar”, was released in late 2000 and became a number two hit in the UK but underperformed in the United States. The album was subsequently pushed back and retooled after select tracks were later leaked to the radio and Internet. After having revised and renamed to 8701, the album was released August 7, 2001 (8.7.01). The first two singles “U Remind Me” and “U Got It Bad” each topped the Billboard Hot 100 for four and six weeks, respectively. 8701 has been certified four-time platinum in the United States.

Usher appeared in the 2001 film Texas Rangers. In February 2002, Usher won a Grammy for ‘Best Male R&B Vocal Performance’ for “U Remind Me”. The next year, he won the same award for “U Don’t Have to Call”, making Usher the only artist aside from Luther Vandross and Stevie Wonder to win this award consecutively. In summer 2002, Usher contributed vocals to P. Diddy’s “I Need a Girl, Part I”. The year closed out with a trio of TV series appearances, all in November, on The Twilight Zone, 7th Heaven, Moesha, and American Dreams, the latter in which Usher portrayed Marvin Gaye.
2004–09: Confessions and Here I Stand
Usher arriving in Miami, Florida, to attend the 2004 MTV Video Music Awards

Usher’s fourth studio album, Confessions, was released on March 23, 2004—just as its first single, “Yeah!”, was in its sixth week at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and fifth week on top of the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Singles Chart. The album’s nearly 1.1 million unit debut sales was the highest first-week numbers ever scanned by a male R&B artist and the seventh best of the Nielsen SoundScan history. To date, the album has accumulated sales of over 20 million copies worldwide, over 10 million of which were sold in the United States, earning the album a Diamond certification by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The album’s second and third singles, “Burn” and “Confessions Part II”, also topped the Billboard Hot 100, the former for eight weeks. Usher became the first artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay with four consecutive number-one singles, In September 2004, “My Boo”, a duet with American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys, also peaked at number one at the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the album’s fourth number-one single. In December, the album’s final single “Caught Up” peaked at number eight on the Hot 100.

Confessions earned Usher numerous awards, including four American Music Awards, two MTV Europe Music Awards, two MTV Video Music Awards, and three World Music Awards. At the 47th annual Grammy Awards ceremony in 2005, Usher won three awards, including: R&B Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocals for “My Boo”, which he shared with Keys; Rap/Sung Collaboration for “Yeah!”; and Contemporary R&B Album for Confessions. At the 2004 Billboard Music Awards, Usher was recognized Artist of the Year, in addition to receiving 10 other accolades.

In spring of 2005, Usher scored a number three Hot 100 hit as a featured vocalist on Lil’ Jon’s “Lovers & Friends”. In 2007, Usher also collaborated with R. Kelly on the track “Same Girl”, for Kelly’s album, Double Up. He was also featured in a remix version of Omarion’s “Ice Box”. Usher also appeared on the track “Shake Down” on American singer-songwriter Mary J. Blige’s 2007 album Growing Pains. In November 2005, Usher starred as a disc jockey named Darrell in the Lions Gate film, In the Mix. On August 22, 2006, Usher took over the role of Billy Flynn in the long-running Broadway musical Chicago.
Usher performing with Stevie Wonder and Shakira at the We Are One: The Obama Inaugural Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial

Here I Stand was released on May 26 in the United Kingdom and May 27, 2008, in the United States. The album debuted at No.1 on the Billboard 200 Chart with first-week sales of over 433,000 copies. It has been certified platinum by the RIAA. To date Here I Stand has now sold over 1.5 million copies in the United States, been certified platinum by the RIAA,[62] and has sold over 5 million copies worldwide. While not approaching the success of his previous album, it received positive reviews from most music critics, who praised the maturity in the album’s lyrics. To promote Usher’s fifth studio album, the single “Love In This Club” was sent to radio in February 2008 and peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. It went on to spend three consecutive weeks at the top—becoming Usher’s eighth number-one single and the fastest-rising song of his career. It also reached No.1 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. The single was another huge international success for Usher. It reached No.1 on the New Zealand Singles Chart, No.3 on the Irish Singles Chart, No.3 on the Eurochart Hot 100, No.4 on the UK Singles Chart, No.5 on the Japan Hot 100, No.5 on the German Singles Chart, No.5 on the Belgian Singles Chart (Flanders), No.6 on the Canadian Hot 100, No.8 on the Swedish Singles Chart, No.8 on the Australian Singles Chart, No.9 on the French Singles Chart, No.9 on the Swiss Singles Chart, No.10 on the Norwegian Singles Chart, No.12 on the Austrian Singles Chart, No.13 on the Belgian Singles Chart (Wallonia), and No.18 on the Finnish Singles Chart. The follow-up single “Love in This Club Part II”, which features American singer Beyoncé Knowles and rapper, Lil Wayne, peaked at No.18 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No.7 on the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs chart. Its third single “Moving Mountains” peaked at No.18 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart and reached No.6 on the New Zealand Singles Chart. The album’s fifth single “Trading Places” peaked at No.4 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. In September 2008, Usher announced he would embark on the 15-date tour One Night Stand, in which the audience is only females. On January 18, 2009, Usher performed with Stevie Wonder and Shakira at the We Are One: The Obama Inaugural Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial. He also sang “Gone Too Soon” at the memorial of Michael Jackson on July 7, 2009.
2010–11: Raymond v. Raymond and Versus
Usher on the OMG Tour

Raymond v. Raymond, was released on March 26, 2010, in Germany, on March 30, 2010, in the US, and on April 26, 2010, in the UK. The album was expected to follow in Usher’s Confessions album’s footsteps. Raymond v. Raymond was released only months after Usher’s divorce from Tameka Foster. “Papers”, a song about divorce, was released as the first single for the album in October 2009. It topped the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs chart for two consecutive weeks, becoming his tenth number one single on that chart. It also peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. Critics praised the song for its emotion. “Hey Daddy (Daddy’s Home)”, was released as the second single on December 8, 2009. The single peaked at number 24 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number 2 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. The song was released as the second international single in July 2010. “Lil Freak” was announced as the album’s official second single in the United States. Usher and Nicki Minaj shot the music video for the song on March 9, 2010, in Los Angeles with director TAJ Stansberry. It reached number 8 on the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs chart and number 40 on the Billboard Hot 100. It became Usher’s fourth Top 40 hit single from Raymond v. Raymond, when including the buzz single “Papers”.

“OMG”, which features will.i.am, is the third official US single and the first international single. The song received mixed reviews, complimenting the song’s dance and club vibe but criticizing the Auto-Tune effect. It reached number-one in Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States. The song became his ninth number one in the United States, making him the first 2010s artist to collect number one singles in three consecutive decades, and only the fourth artist of all-time to achieve the feat. Usher also became the third artist to have at least one number one song from five consecutive studio albums. The song’s choreography and dance-heavy accompanying music video has been compared to that of “Yeah!”. *”There Goes My Baby” was released to airplay as the album’s fourth single in the United States on June 15, 2010. The song reached number 25 on the Billboard Hot 100, and number-one on the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs chart, becoming Usher’s eleventh number-one hit on that chart. All of the album’s singles received incredible air play. On April 7, 2010, Raymond v. Raymond debuted at number No.1 on the US Billboard 200 chart, becoming his third consecutive No.1 album and selling an impressive 329,107 copies in its first week of release, making him the first male artist since Eminem to have three consecutive albums debut at number one on the Billboard 200 chart. After one month of release the album was certified Gold by the RIAA. On June 17, 2010, the album was certified Platinum by the RIAA.

Raymond v. Raymond also dominated the International Charts. Debuting inside the top 10 in Canada, the United Kingdom, Holland, Australia, Germany, Spain, and Italy. Due to the huge international success of Ushers newest single “OMG” and the good first week sales for Raymond v. Raymond Usher is considered to have repaired his mainstream image and to have made a good comeback. The album reached number-two in Australia and the album has been certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). The album debuted at number four in Canada and has been certified Gold by the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA). Raymond v. Raymond debuted at number-two in the United Kingdom.

usher

Usher announced on July 8, 2010, a follow-up extended play to his sixth studio album Raymond v. Raymond called Versus, and a deluxe edition of Raymond v. Raymond, both to be released on August 24, 2010. Usher described Versus as “the last chapter of Raymond v. Raymond”, and that it would explore the subjects of being newly single and a father. The album included 9 tracks, including 7 new tracks, Raymond v. Raymond single “There Goes My Baby”, and Justin Bieber single “Somebody to Love (Remix)”. The tracks would be included on a deluxe edition of Raymond v. Raymond. The album debuted at number four on the Billboard 200 chart and is preceded by the singles “DJ Got Us Fallin’ In Love” featuring Pitbull, for mainstream audiences, and “Hot Tottie” featuring Jay-Z, for urban circuits.[citation needed]

The first single from the album, “DJ Got Us Fallin’ In Love”, was released to iTunes on July 13, 2010, and sent to radio on July 20, 2010. Due to strong digital sales the song debuted at number nineteen on the Billboard Hot 100. The song became the fourth highest debut on the Billboard Hot 100 of his career, behind 1997’s “Nice & Slow” at number nine, 1998’s “My Way” at eight, and 2010’s “OMG” at number fourteen. Since its release, it has gained international success, peaking in the top 5 in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. It reached the top 10 in Canada, and Europe. It reached number-nine on the Billboard Hot 100 in its third week of release, and became the first time Usher has had two top-ten hits on the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time since his album Confessions. It also became Ushers sixteenth Billboard Hot 100 top-ten hit of his career. The second single, Hot Tottie has reached number thirteen on the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs chart and number twenty-five on the Billboard Hot 100.

Usher appeared at the 2010 MTV VMAs on September 12, 2010. He then performed at the 2010 American Music Awards on November 21, 2010, and also won the awards for Male Soul R&B artist and Favorite Soul R&B album for his album, Raymond v. Raymond. According to Rap-Up.com, Usher has started working on his next studio album, and that he is again teaming up with long-time collaborator Rico Love. During an interview with stylelist, Usher explained that he is working on a new genre of music depicted as ‘revolutionary pop’, to which several different genres are combined to create a new sound, this new music is to be included on his upcoming album. The OMG Tour began in November 2010.

Usher also made a surprise appearance at Super Bowl XLV to sing his song, “OMG” with The Black Eyed Peas’ singer will.i.am. He appeared on a rope from above, in a similar style to the Black Eyed Peas. The OMG Tour ended on June 1, 2011, it made $70 million worldwide.
2012–present: Looking 4 Myself, The Voice, and UR

In November 2011, Usher revealed that for his next album he was working on a new type of music which he has depicted as “revolutionary pop”, which combines different genres to form a new sound. His seventh studio album Looking 4 Myself was released on June 8, 2012, worldwide and received generally positive reviews from contemporary music critics. American singer-songwriter and record producer Rico Love was interviewed by Billboard magazine stuff, where he spoke about his relationships with artists and experiences. He commented on how Usher wanted to do things differently on the album compared to his previous efforts, saying: “What he wanted to do [on Looking 4 Myself] was explore himself musically. He stepped outside of what was safe and normal. He wanted to make an album that expressed where he was going sonically and not just where he’s been for the past 12 to 15 years. He’s growing, developing, moving, shaking, and being something that’s new, cultural, and that’s affecting people sonically. That’s kind of forcing the people to grow and elevate”. In an interview for MTV News, Usher stated that Looking 4 Myself is “the most artistic of an album” he has ever had in history. When questioned by Reuters during an interview regarding the latter quote, and how this project was different, Usher explained that he felt he was near a ‘rebirth’ and that prior to Looking 4 Myself, he felt restricted and conformed to a specific standard. He said to himself “I gotta go with what I feel and hopefully people will follow me”.

The lead single from Usher’s seventh studio album is titled “Climax”. It impacted Urban radio on February 21, 2012, and was made available for purchase as a digital download on February 22, 2012. It impacted US mainstream radio on March 13, 2012. The second single released from the album was “Scream” and the third single “Lemme See” which features Rick Ross. “Scream” was premiered on April 26, 2012, while “Lemme See” was premiered on May 8, 2012.

In 2013, Usher substituted for CeeLo Green as a coach for the fourth season of NBC’s The Voice. His last act, Michelle Chamuel, lost the winning title to Danielle Bradbery, mentored by Blake Shelton. He returned for the sixth season and his last act, Josh Kaufman, won.

Usher also appeared on the 37th annual 4 July Fireworks show sponsored by Macy’s and was aired on NBC with a special soundtrack designed for the show featuring four of his very own songs.

On March 19, 2013, Usher made initial notice of his eighth studio album being in the works. Talking to The Fader, he described the album as “everything you can imagine”, saying that it’s “gonna be freaking out of here”. In an interview with singer-songwriter Eric Bellinger by Rap-Up, the former explained that he, along with Jermaine Dupri, Bryan-Michael Cox, and Brian Alexander Morgan, was working on Usher’s next album. Bellinger compared the album’s music to Usher’s Confessions (2004), saying that it is “more R&B, more urban” than Usher’s Looking 4 Myself. The latter declared that his next album would show that he is “still Usher.” “Good Kisser,” a dance-heavy throwback R&B track, was released as the lead single. Produced by Pop & Oak, it was performed at The Voice.

K-Ci & JoJo – All My Life

K-Ci & JoJo – All My Life

is an American R&B duo, consisting of brothers Cedric “K-Ci” Hailey (born September 2, 1969) and Joel “JoJo” Hailey (born June 10, 1971), Natives of Monroe, North Carolina, they are also the lead singers of the chart-topping R&B group Jodeci with the DeGrate brothers—Donald (better known as DeVante Swing) and Dalvin.
K-Ci & JoJo’s first sign of independence came in 1994 when K-Ci covered Bobby Womack’s hit “If You Think You’re Lonely Now” for the movie Jason’s Lyric. Early in 1996, K-Ci & JoJo teamed up for the song “How Could You” for the movie Bulletproof starring Damon Wayans and Adam Sandler. By July 1996, K-Ci & JoJo finally had a hit on their hands as guest artists in 2Pac’s number-one R&B hit “How Do U Want It”. It also topped the Billboard Hot 100. They also gained popularity with 2Pac’s last music video, “Toss it Up”.
1997-98: Love Always

The brothers made their side projects into a full album, Love Always. Released on June 17, 1997, the album spawned two top-ten R&B hits: “You Bring Me Up” (Pop #26) and “Last Night’s Letter” (Pop #46). The minor success of those singles, however, paled in comparison to the success of the album’s third single, “All My Life” (which was dedicated to JoJo’s daughter). A supple, lush ballad far removed from the Jodeci material of the early 1990s, “All My Life” was the number-one song on the Hot 100 for three weeks, a feat that K-Ci & JoJo had never achieved with Jodeci. It features a piano melody very similar to that of the electric piano found backing “Dancing In The Moonlight” by King Harvest. Future singles and albums would be crafted in the vein of “All My Life”, which was the duo’s only number-one hit, though many consider it one of the greatest jazz pop melodies of all time. Love Always went on to sell four million copies, and the success of the album put Jodeci’s reunion on hold indefinitely. During the recording of Love Always they also appeared in the song “I Care ‘Bout You” as a member of the R&B Supergroup Milestone along with After 7 which appeared on the soundtrack for the movie, Soul Food that was written and produced by Babyface.

all my life

In 1998, K-Ci & JoJo recorded the song “Money Can’t Buy You Love,” which was produced for the film The Players Club.

In 1999, K-Ci & JoJo recorded “Life”, which was written and produced by R. Kelly, for the soundtrack to the Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence movie Life.
1999: It’s Real

K-Ci & JoJo’s second studio album, It’s Real was released on June 22, 1999. It peaked at number eight on the Billboard 200, peaked at number two on the R&B/Hip Hop Albums, and was certified platinum by the RIAA. Outside of the US, the album reached top 20 on the Dutch Mega Album Top 100, the Canadian Albums Chart, and appeared on the New Zealand Top 40 Albums and the ARIA Charts. The album spawned four singles, including the number-two Billboard song, “Tell Me It’s Real”.

It’s Real received a three star rating from Allmusic.
2000: X

K-Ci & JoJo returned with X on December 5, 2000. X, the Roman numeral for ten, was picked as the album title to celebrate the Haileys’ tenth anniversary in the music business. They made a strong return to the Billboard Hot 100 early in 2001 with the song “Crazy”, also included on the Save the Last Dance soundtrack. “Crazy” peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100. The album also features a hidden Jodeci track entitled “Slip And Fall”. Other tracks included “Honest Lover,” “One Last Time,” and “All the Things I Should Have Known” which Vibe magazine considered “convey a similar mix of hip hop collective that launched Del the Funky Homosapien.”
2002-08: Emotional & Other projects

The fourth K-Ci & JoJo album, Emotional, was released on November 26, 2002, but did not find commercial success. The CD consisted of one single, “This Very Moment.” and also their personal favorite “How Long” written by Steve Vaughn and Jojo Hailey.

In late 2006, K-Ci released his debut solo album entitled My Book. K-Ci & JoJo released a greatest hits album on February 8, 2005. On February 6, 2008, they released their fifth compilation album called Love, which was released only in Japan.
2013-present: My Brother’s Keeper

In 2010, they signed an exclusive deal with R&B crooner Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds’ upstart Soda Pop Records, distributed through E1 Music. On June 25, 2013, they released their new single, “Knock It Off” via iTunes through E1 Music. On September 30, 2013 My Brother’s Keeper was released.

all my lifeMedia:

In 2010, TV One aired the reality docu-series, “K-Ci & joJo…Come Clean,” which featured K-Ci and JoJo Hailey, lead singers of the Grammy Award Winning 90’s R&B boy band, Jodeci. The series showcased the brothers current struggles with alcohol and drugs as they work to rebuild their relationship and make a comeback. “K-Ci & JoJo…Come Clean,” was produced by John Doe Media, with Carl Craig and D. Renard Young serving as Executive Producers. The series only aired for one season, but still runs several times a year due to the popularity of the show and the 90’s R&B singing brothers.

K-Ci & JoJo – All My Life

Keith Sweat – My Body – Live Performance

Keith Sweat

(born July 22, 1961) is an American R&B/soul, singer-songwriter, record producer, radio personality and an innovator of New Jack Swing.
Keith Sweat was born in Crescent City, Florida. He is the son of hairdresser Juanita Sweat and factory worker Charles Crier. Charles died in 1973 and Juanita raised her five kids alone. In addition, he has a 14 year old distant cousin named Jaelin B. Sweat who earned a BS in communications from City College of New York. He worked as a night stock boy at Macy’s and then a mailroom clerk at Paine Webber. In just four years he worked his way up to a lucrative brokerage assistant job on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Sweat worked for the commodities market in the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Sweat sang at nightclubs throughout New York City until he was discovered and offered a recording contract with Elektra Records in 1987.

He has two daughters, Keyshia (1990) and Keia (1992). He named his record label, Keia Entertainment, after his younger daughter. From 1992 until 2002, he was married to Real Housewives of Atlanta co-star Lisa Wu Hartwell. With her, he had sons Jordan (1995) and Justin (1998).

Sweat has full custody of all four of his children and is a single dad. He raised his kids in Atlanta, Georgia with the aid of his mother.
Music career
1975–1984: with Jamilah

Sweat started his musical career as a member of a Harlem band called “Jamilah” in 1975. With the help of Jamilah, Sweat was able to hone his craft as a lead singer by performing regionally throughout the tri-State area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The group was started by bassist Larry Peoples, guitarist Michael Samuels, and drummer Walter Bradley. Additional members of the group included Peter DaCosta (vocals), Joseph McGeachy (sax), Dwight Banks (trumpet), and Kenneth Varner (keyboards).
1984–1987: Stadium Records

After leaving the group in 1984 to begin a solo career, he sang at nightclubs throughout New York City and landed a chance to record for the independent label, Stadium Records. Sweat recorded only one tune for Stadium called “My Mind Is Made Up”, which was their third ever release, but on Stadium’s first release, he is credited as co-writer and co-producer of “You Are The One For Me”, the last recording ever made by the group GQ. One of GQ’s original members is his uncle, Keith “Sabu” Crier.
1987–1993: The New Jack Swing era

Later in 1987, Keith Sweat was discovered by Vincent Davis and offered a recording contract with his label, Vintertainment Records, which was founded in 1983 on the foundations of early Hip-Hop and otherwise best known for releasing Joeski Love’s “Pee Wee Dance” in 1985. Vintertainment was distributed by Elektra Records from 1985 until it ceased operations in 1990, in which case Elektra opted to buy Keith’s contract outright and have him record directly for the label.[citation needed]. On November 25, 1987, Sweat released his debut solo studio album Make It Last Forever, which sold three million copies. The biggest hit from this album was the song that inaugurated the New Jack Swing era “I Want Her” (#1 R&B/#5 Pop), which was nominated for the 1989 Soul Train Best R&B/Urban Contemporary Song of the Year award, while the title track from the album hit #2 on the R&B charts. Sweat reached the charts again with his second album I’ll Give All My Love to You (1990) which hit #6 on the Billboard 200 chart. The singles released during this period included “(There You Go) Tellin’ Me No Again” (from the film New Jack City). He released his third album, Keep It Comin’ in 1991 which debuted in the top 20 of the album chart. This album, included the songs, “Why Me Baby” (featuring LL Cool J) and “Keep It Comin'”. Sweat then moved from New York to Atlanta, where he founded the Keia Records label that would feature Silk & Kut Klose.
1994–2001: The Still In The Game era

Sweat released his fourth album Get Up on It in the summer of 1994, and his self-titled fifth album in 1996. Both albums reached the top ten on the Billboard 200. The single co/produced and written by Eric McCaine “Twisted” featuring R&B group Kut Klose hit #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and “Nobody” hit #3, which made them Sweat’s biggest hits to date. The song “Just A Touch”, with Traci Hale providing background vocals, has earned a regular spot on radio playlists. “Just A Touch” was a cover of the 1979 song “Just a Touch of Love” by Slave. Sweat’s sixth album, Still in the Game was released in 1998, hitting #6 on the Billboard 200, and #2 on the R&B/Hip Hop albums chart. It featured the singles “Come and Get With Me” (which featured Snoop Dogg) (#12 Hot 100) and “I’m Not Ready” (#16 Hot 100). Sweat’s success on the charts started to diminish in 2000, when he released the album Didn’t See Me Coming. None of the singles from the album reached the top forty. They were moderate hits on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart.

keith sweat

2002–present: The Rebirth era:

On August 13, 2002, Keith Sweat released his eighth album, Rebirth. The single “One on One” reached #75 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #44 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. His 2008 album Just Me fared better with its first single, “Love U Better (featuring Keyshia Cole)” being played on Urban radio stations for about a year before the album’s release. Sweat is currently signed to Kedar Records and released his tenth studio album entitled Ridin’ Solo on June 22, 2010. The lead single taken from the album is “Test Drive” and featured label-mate Joe. Since 2007, Sweat has been the host of a nationally syndicated radio program based upon the Quiet storm format. The Keith Sweat Hotel (known as The Quiet Storm with Keith Sweat on WBLS in New York City) is syndicated through Premiere Radio Networks.
Protégés

In 1992, Sweat discovered the group Silk, and helped craft their debut album, Lose Control, which hit #7 on the Billboard 200 album chart. The album’s single “Freak Me” hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on May 1, 1993. In 1993, Sweat discovered the Atlanta based female R&B group Kut Klose. Sweat also produced the group’s debut album Surrender, which produced the their biggest hit single “I Like”, peaking to #8 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. In the fall of 1997, Sweat discovered the group Ol’ Skool and helped with their self-titled debut. He was on their biggest single, “Am I Dreaming,” which featured R&B group Xscape.

Keith Sweat also formed the R&B supergroup LSG with Gerald Levert and Johnny Gill, and released their self-titled debut Levert.Sweat.Gill in 1997. That album featured “My Body”, which became a hit single. The album was certified double platinum and reached #4 on the U.S. Billboard 200.

Eric Benet – Georgy Porgy – Live

Eric Benet

Eric Benet Jordan (born October 15, 1966), known professionally as Eric Benét, is an American R&B and neo soul singer-songwriter, who has received a total of four Grammy nominations to date for his musical work.
Benét was his mother’s maiden name, and he was born in Mobile, Alabama and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is the youngest of five siblings.

Benét sang with a Top 100-style group called Gerard in the late 1980s. Benét, his sister Lisa, and his cousin George Nash Jr. formed a band called Benét and released a self-titled album in 1992, and it went on to sell over 100,000 copies. Two years later, Eric Benét broke onto the music scene with his solo career and signed with Warner Bros. Records, releasing his debut solo album, True to Myself in 1996. His sophomore album, A Day in the Life, was released in 1999 and featured his smash hit “Spend My Life With You (featuring Tamia)”, which rose to #1 on the US Billboard R&B charts (for 3 weeks), was certified gold, and nominated for a 2000 Grammy Award for “Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group”. The album also won a Soul Train Music Award for “Best R&B Soul Album, Male”.

Benét’s career, however, was interrupted by a series of personal tragedies. His father died of cancer. His girlfriend Tami Marie Stauff died on April 24, 1993 from injuries suffered in an automobile accident; their daughter, India, was born in 1991 leaving Eric a single father to a one year old.

He married actress Halle Berry in January 2001, but by early October 2003 they had separated, with the divorce finalized in January 2005. On July 31, 2011, he married Prince’s ex-wife, Manuela Testolini, who gave birth to their first child, a baby girl Lucia Bella, in December 21, 2011.
Career

In 1994, Benét signed with Warner Bros. Records, releasing his solo debut album, True to Myself in 1996. Individual songs from the album were successful, including the top-ten R&B hits “Spiritual Thang”, “Femininity” and “Let’s Stay Together”, which originally appeared on the soundtrack of the film A Thin Line Between Love and Hate.

“Don’t Forget The Love” by Jeff Lorber feat. CeCe Peniston.

 

eric benet

CeCe Peniston sings lead vocals on this song written by Jeff Lorber and Benet. It was released on Lorber’s album West Side Stories in 1994.
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In between albums, Eric collaborated with his then-labelmates Somethin’ for the People on their 1997 album This Time It’s Personal singing leads on the single “Act Like You Want It”. His next album, A Day in the Life, was released in 1999. Its first single, “Georgy Porgy (featuring Faith Evans)” received significant airplay, but the second single, “Spend My Life With You (featuring Tamia)”, became a smash hit. “Spend My Life With You” rose to number one on the American R&B charts, was certified gold, and nominated for a 2000 Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group. The album, A Day in the Life also won a Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul Album, Male.

Benét also recorded for Earth, Wind, and Fire’s 30th anniversary CD. He contributed vocals to the post-Katrina charity single, “Heart of America” along with Michael McDonald, Wynonna Judd, and Terry Dexter. He has also lent his vocals to many jazz albums for such artists as Wayman Tisdale, George Duke, Chris Botti, Jeff Lorber, Boney James, etc.

Benét recorded his following album Better and Better in 2001, but Warner Bros. rejected to release this album and forced him to stay in the R&B genre. Due to the controversy about music style and creative freedom, Benét changed to Reprise-distributed label Friday Records and recorded his next album, Hurricane.[4][5] Thus Hurricane became his third (released) studio album on June 21, 2005 in the US. “I Wanna Be Loved” was the song that received the most airplay. The single reached number two on the Urban Adult Contemporary chart.

His fourth album Love & Life was released on September 9, 2008. It debuted at number eleven on the Billboard 200 and number two on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart, making this his own highest peak position since A Day in the Life in 1999.[6] The first single “You’re the Only One” is also his first top 20 hit on the R&B chart in two years.

Lost in Time was Benét’s fifth studio album which was released in the US on November 30, 2010. The first single “Sometimes I Cry” reached number one on the Hot Adult R&B Songs Chart. With its musical direction representing Benet’s homage to the sweet soul sound of the early to mid-1970s, the album featured duets with Faith Evans; Chrisette Michelle; Ledisi; and Eddie Levert of The O’Jays.[7]

On June 5, 2012 Eric then released his latest album The One. It was the first album released on Benét’s newly formed record label Jordan House Records, which he created in partnership with EMI. “Real Love” was the first single off The One and was the #1 added song to Urban AC when shipped to radio in October 2011.

In 2013 Eric Benet’s 6th studio album, The One, won him the SoulTracks Readers’ Choice Award for Best Male Vocalist. The One delivered 3 big hit tracks including ‘Runnin,’ ‘Real Love,’ and ‘Harriett Jones.’

In April 2014, Benet signed R&B singer-songwriter Calvin Richardson and Goapele to his imprint along with BMG/Primary Wave Music to release their upcoming albums in the US.

In 2014 Eric Benet released an international album, The Other One, teaming up with the European production collective, The Afropeans to revisit his 2012 album The One. He then released an album exclusively distributed in Japan, titled, From E to U, Vol. 1- an album of classic cover songs.

eric benetActing career:

Benét has also been active as an actor; he had a recurring role on For Your Love (TV series) (1998–2002). He made his film debut alongside Mariah Carey in Glitter (2001). He has a recurring role on the MTV scripted show Kaya (2007) where he plays a music producer. Benet appeared on Half & Half in which he portrayed Reece Wilcox in 2005.

His second feature film`role Trinity Goodheart premiered at the American Black Film Festival on July 9, 2011 and is set to premiere on GMC on August 20, 2011.

In Fall of 2013 Eric Benet brought his talents to the television screen when he appeared on the second season of BET’s hit television show, The Real Husbands of Hollywood. Benet introduced the world to his comedic skills as a guest star alongside Kevin Hart, Bobby Brown, and Boris Kodjoe. The Real Husbands of Hollywood is filmed in a style similar to that of Bravo’s popular television series, The Real Housewives.
Awards and nominations

Black Reel Awards
2002, winner, Best Song “Love Don’t Love Me” (The Brothers)
2012, nominee, Best Actor: Television Movie or Mini-Series (Trinity Goodheart)

Grammy Awards
2000, Nominee (Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group) “Spend My Life with You” (with Tamia)
2009, Nominee (Best R&B Male Performance) “You’re the Only One”
2009, Nominee (Best R&B Album) Love & Life
2012, Nominee (Best Traditional R&B Performance) “Sometimes I Cry”

NAACP Image Awards
1997, Nominee (Outstanding New Artists) “True To Myself”
2000, Nominee (Outstanding Male Artist) “A Day In The Life”
2000, Winner (Outstanding Song) “Spend My Life With You” – Songwriter: Eric Benet
2000, Nominee (Outstanding Album) “A Day In The Life”
2001, Nominee (Outstanding Male Artist) “When You Think of Me” (featuring Roy Ayers)
2001, Nominee (Outstanding Music Video) “When You Think of Me” (Directed by Prentice Smith)

Eric Benet

Stephanie Mills – Home – Live Performance

 

 Stephanie Mills,

Stephanie Dorthea Mills (born March 22, 1957) is an American R&B, soul and gospel singer, songwriter, and Broadway star.
Mills began her career appearing in her first play at the age of nine. Two years later, Mills won Amateur Night at the Apollo Theater a record six times. The victory led to her being cast in her first Broadway role, the orphaned child of a runaway slave in the musical Maggie Flynn.

In 1973, Mills’ musical recording career was launched when she was signed to Paramount records by Michael Barbiero, and her first single “I Knew It Was Love” was released. She was later signed to Motown. Her first two albums there failed to generate a buzz as the label could not find Mills’ sound and she left the label in 1976.

Mills’ career took a rise when she portrayed Dorothy in an African American adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz entitled The Wiz, where she began dating Michael Jackson. Filled with a more urban style of music and scenery, The Wiz made Mills a star particularly because of her stellar performance of the song “Home”. It would become her signature tune for years, and would be covered later by Diana Ross for the big-screen adaptation three years later and by Whitney Houston for her dramatic musical performance debut on TV in the early 1980s. When she sang “Home”, the musical’s answer to “Somewhere Over The Rainbow”, her theatrical delivery thrilled audiences and marked her as a talent to watch. One of her most appreciative fans was Michael. By his own count he saw The Wiz eight times, in part because of the up-coming film version but also because he and Mills had become friends. Like Michael, and Tatum O’Neal, she was a teen star burdened with adult pressures and popularity. Those close to the young star said she was quite infatuated with Michael. At cabaret appearances around New York, Mills sang “I Wanna Be Where You Are” and used Jacksonesque stage mannerisms. But for Michael she was a good friend, nothing more. Later in her career she often sang a quite passionate version of “He’s Out Of My Life”, a female version of “She’s Out Of My Life”.” – The Michael Jackson Story, Nelson George

stephanie mills

Commercial success was elusive until 1979, when signed under the 20th Century Fox Records record label, Mills found her breakthrough in disco music, recording songs such as “Put Your Body In It”, “You Can Get Over”, and “What Cha’ Gonna Do With My Lovin'”. The resulting album, What Cha’ Gonna Do with My Lovin’, was Mills’ first gold record.

She quickly followed the success with 1980’s Sweet Sensation, which featured Mills’ biggest hit to date, the Reggie Lucas-produced “Never Knew Love Like This Before”. The single became a #12 R&B and #6 Pop hit in 1980, as well as reaching #4 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] 1981’s Stephanie featured a top hit for her and Teddy Pendergrass entitled “Two Hearts”, while her 1983 album, Merciless, featured her hit cover of Prince’s “How Come You Don’t Call Me Anymore?”, as well as the #3 dance chart hit “Pilot Error”, which was her first dance hit in the U.S. In 1984, Mills had her third UK hit with “The Medicine Song” (#29),[2] which also reached #1 on the U.S. dance chart. In 1985, Mills’ recording of “Bit by Bit (Theme from Fletch)” was featured in the Chevy Chase film, Fletch, and reached #52 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart and #78 on The Billboard Hot 100.

Success for Mills had peaked until 1986, when her version of the Angela Winbush-penned “I Have Learned to Respect the Power of Love”, hit #1 on the R&B singles chart. Mills truly returned, however, with her next release, If I Were Your Woman in 1987 under MCA Records, which she was now signed. The hits from the album include the title track, originally a hit for Gladys Knight & the Pips in 1971; a three-week #1 R&B hit, “I Feel Good All Over” (a song her label mate Patti LaBelle did not wish to cover); and “You’re Puttin’ a Rush on Me”, to name a few of the songs released. The album reached platinum status. That same year, she appeared in the NBC TV special, Motown: Merry Christmas along with other musical artists and actors, performing the song, “Christmas Everyday”, which was written by actor/comedian Redd Foxx.

stephanie mills

Mills’ success continued with 1989’s Home album. The hits from that album include “The Comfort of a Man”, the title track, a cover of her old standard from The Wiz and another song penned by Winbush titled “Something in the Way You Make Me Feel”. It became another platinum record for Mills.

Mills would record one more album (1992’s Something Real) and a Christmas album before being released from her contract with MCA in 1992. Mills released a live gospel recording in 1995 on GospoCentric Records entitled Personal Inspirations. The set was produced by Donald Lawrence and featured a spiritualized retooling of her hit “I Have Learned To Respect The Power Of Love”. Thereafter, Mills took a break from recording to care for her son.

Mills returned to musical theater in 1997, playing the lead in a major production of Stephen Schwartz’s Children of Eden in New Jersey, which Schwartz has called “the definitive production” of the show. Mills was heavily featured in the cast recording CD that resulted from this production.

In 2008, Mills began a comeback with singles recorded with BeBe Winans and rapper DMX to name a few. She made a comeback in independently-releasing Born For This (released on Expansion Records in the UK) on 3 August 2004. Her first single in over a decade, “Can’t Let Him Go”, garnered buzz at urban contemporary radio. Mills is currently touring. A 2-disc, career-spanning greatest hits compilation entitled Gold was released by Hip-O/Universal Music earlier last year. Mills just finished production of a live DVD recorded at BB Kings in New York which will be sold online and at her shows.

Stephanie Mills made an appearance in the 2007 gospel TV series Sunday Best and was recently featured in a live interview on The Yolanda Adams Morning Show, where she mentioned that she now has her own record label (JM Records).

Mills performed prior to Pope Benedict XVI celebrating Mass at Yankee Stadium in New York on April 20, 2008.

In a recent interview Mills stated that she would be releasing her Live CD during the end of this year and that Live CD will include two new tracks.

Her new album entitled Breathless is set to be released soon. Her new single “Yesterday” is available for download on iTunes.

Towards the end of 2012, Mills released a new single “So In Love This Christmas”, available for download.

stephanie mills
Personal life

Stephanie Mills is the fifth of six children. She was born in Queens and raised predominantly in Brooklyn, New York. Mills claims that she was romantically involved with Michael Jackson for a short period of time while she was doing The Wiz.
In 2002 Ebony magazine reported that Mills had been married in the 1980s for a brief period, to Jeffrey Daniel from the soul group Shalamar and again in the mid-1980s to Dino Meminger but that both marriages had ended in less than two years.[5] “I also wanted to know why my relationships never made it to two years. I knew it was me,” says Mills. “You can’t blame it on another person. That’s where a lot of women go wrong… carrying over from a bad relationship to a new relationship.”

Mills married a third time to Charlotte, North Carolina, radio program manager, Michael Saunders, in 1993 in a wedding ceremony performed by Minister Louis Farrakhan. The couple divorced sometime later.

In an interview with Soul Music in 2002, Mills revealed that she had a son, Farad. She added that giving birth “was the best thing I’ve ever done. It was amazingly wonderful and I wish I had started earlier. I might have had two or three before, but I had some problems before in being able to have children. But things work out when they’re supposed to… now I’m a single working parent and loving it!” However, Mills refused to identify Farad’s father.

In an interview with Windy City Times in 2010, Mills said that she presently makes her home in Charlotte, North Carolina and that her son, Farad has Down’s Syndrome. “The Shriners are celebrating their 88th anniversary, and they have 22 hospitals nationwide,” says Stephanie  Mills. “And what I love is even my son — I have a child with Down syndrome — can get access to the best spinal-cord doctors in the country.”

SADE – Cherish the Day – Live 2011

Sade,

Sade (/ʃɑːˈdeɪ/ shah-DAY) are an English soul band formed in London in 1983, although three of their members were originally from Kingston Upon Hull, East Yorkshire. The band was named after their lead singer Sade. Their music features elements of soul, R&B, jazz, and soft rock.

The Bands debut album, Diamond Life, was released in 1984, reaching No. 2 in the UK Album Chart, selling over 1.2 million copies in the UK, and won the Brit Award for Best British Album in 1985. The album was also a hit internationally, reaching No. 1 in several countries and the top ten in the US where it has sold in excess of 4 million copies. In late 1985, The Band released their second album, Promise, which peaked at No. 1 in both the UK and the US. It was certified double platinum in the UK, and quadruple platinum in the US. In 1986 the band won a Grammy Award for Best New Artist. Their 2002 album, Lovers Rock, won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album. The Bands sixth studio album, Soldier of Love, was released on 8 February 2010, and peaked at No. 4 in the UK, and No. 1 in the US. In 2011, the band won their fourth Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

sade

The Bands US certified sales so far stand at 23.5 million units according to Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), and have sold more than 50 million units worldwide to date. The band were ranked at No. 50 on VH1’s list of the “100 greatest artists of all time.”
The Band was formed in London in 1982, by members of a Latin soul band, Pride. Sade Adu, Stuart Matthewman, and Paul Spencer Denman, together with Paul Anthony Cook, formed the break-away group and began to write their own material. They named the band after lead singer, Sade Adu, and made their debut performance in December 1982 at Ronnie Scott’s Club in London in support of Pride. In May 1983 the band performed their first US show at Danceteria Club in New York City. Andrew Hale joined the band in 1983, but Cook left in 1984. Sade received more attention from the media and record companies than Pride had, and eventually separated from that group altogether. On 18 October 1983, the band signed with Portrait Records (which was absorbed by its parent label, Epic Records, in 1986).When singer Sade and her band of the same name were establishing themselves, their record company, Epic, made a point of printing “Pronounced Shar-day” on the record labels of their releases.

In February 1984, Sade released their first single, “Your Love Is King”, which became a Top Ten hit. A second single, “When Am I Going to Make a Living” barely made the Top 40, but the band’s debut album, Diamond Life, was released in July 1984 and peaked at No. 2. It spent over six months in the UK Top Ten and was later certified 4x Platinum by the BPI. Diamond Life won the 1985 Brit Award for Best British Album. The band embarked on their first major UK tour, augmented by Dave Early (drums), Martin Ditcham (percussion), Terry Bailey (trumpet) and Gordon Matthewman (trombone). A third single, “Smooth Operator”, was released from the album with a video directed by Julian Temple. The single became their first US hit in Spring 1985, propelling the album in the US Top Ten. Also in 1985, the band were nominated for two MTV Video Music Awards—”Best Female Video” and “Best New Artist”. On 13 July 1985, The Band performed at the Live Aid at Wembley Stadium in London. Sade Adu became the only African-born artist to appear in front of the live audience of 75,000, and an estimated worldwide television audience of 1.4 billion in 170 countries.

In late 1985, The Band released their second album, Promise, which peaked at No. 1 in both the UK and the US. It was certified double platinum by the BPI in the UK, and quadruple platinum in the US. In 1986, Adu was nominated for an American Music Awards for Favorite Soul/R&B Female Video Artist, and the band won a Grammy Award for Best New Artist. On 28 June 1986, after touring for the album, the band performed at the Artists Against Apartheid Concert in the Freedom Festival on Clapham Common in London. In 1987 the band was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group for Promise.

The Bands third album, Stronger Than Pride, was released in May 1988. The album peaked at No. 3 in the UK and has been certified platinum by the BPI. It was preceded by the single, “Paradise”, which made the UK Top 30 and US Top 20. The band toured across the world again, augmented by Blair Cunningham (drums), Martin Ditcham (percussion), Leroy Osbourne (vocals), Gordon Hunte (guitar), James McMillan (trumpet) and Jake Jacas (trombone & vocals). In 1989, Sade Adu was nominated for an American Music Award for Favorite Soul/R&B Female Artist.

sade
1990s

The Bands fourth album, Love Deluxe, was released in November 1992. The album peaked at No. 3 on the US Album charts and was certified quadruple-Platinum, and peaked at No. 10 in the UK and was certified Gold by the BPI.

In 1993 the band recorded a cover of the Percy Mayfield song, “Please Send Me Someone to Love”, for the Academy Award-winning film, Philadelphia, before launching the Love Deluxe world tour. Joining the band were Leroy Osbourne (vocals), Gordon Hunte (guitar), Trevor Murrell (drums), Karl Vanden Bossche (percussion), and Rick Braun (trumpet).

The 1994 Grammy for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group was awarded to Sade for “No Ordinary Love”, featured in the 1993 film, Indecent Proposal. In November the group released their first compilation album, The Best of Sade. The album was another Top Ten hit in both the UK and US and was certified Platinum and Quadruple-Platinum respectively. In 1996 Hale, Denman, and Matthewman formed their own band as a side project, Sweetback, and released a self-titled album.
2000s

In October 2000 Sade Adu came out of retirement to perform at the prestigious MOBO Awards, her first live performance in several years. The following month, Sade released their fifth studio album, Lovers Rock, their first album in eight years. The album peaked at number 18 in the UK (their only studio album not to make the top 10) though was certified Gold by the BPI. It fared better in the US, peaking at number 3. It also won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album in 2002. The band toured the US throughout 2001. The tour resulted in a live album, Lovers Live, which was released in the UK and US in February 2002. In 2005 the band contributed the track, “Mum”, to the Voices for Darfur DVD.

sade
2010s

Sade’s sixth studio album Soldier of Love was released worldwide on 8 February 2010, the band’s first album of new material in ten years. Following the release of the “Soldier of Love” single on 8 December 2009, the track debuted at number 11 on the Urban Hot AC chart, making it the highest debut of the decade and the third highest all-time on the Urban Hot AC chart. “Soldier of Love” debuted at number 5 on the Smooth Jazz airplay chart and became the first ever vocal to hit number 1 on the Smooth Jazz Top 20 Countdown.

The album peaked at No. 4 in the UK. In the US the album sold 502,000 copies in its first week and topped the Billboard 200 chart. The album stayed at No. 1 in the US for three weeks. The group released the second single from the album, “Babyfather”, in April 2010, followed by a video in May. On 13 April 2010, the band performed “Babyfather” and “The Sweetest Taboo” on the US TV show Dancing With The Stars. In September 2010 the group announced the first dates of their global tour, Sade Live, to begin in April 2011.

In 2011 Sade received their fourth Grammy Award (Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals) for Soldier of Love, and released a second greatest hits album, The Ultimate Collection which made the UK Top Ten. A new video for the track “Love Is Found” premiered in July 2011.
Band members

Sade Adu – vocals, lyricist, songwriter
Stuart Matthewman – guitar, sax, songwriter
Paul Spencer Denman – bass, songwriter
Andrew Hale – keyboards, songwriter

Ricky Martin – Livin La Vida Loca – Live

Ricky Martin,

Enrique Martín Morales[note 1] (born December 24, 1971), commonly known as Ricky Martin, is a Puerto Rican pop musician, actor and author. Martin began his career at age twelve with the all-boy pop group Menudo. After five years with the group, he released several Spanish-language solo albums throughout the 1990s. He also acted on stage and on TV in Mexico, becoming a modest star in the country. In 1994 he starred on the American TV soap opera General Hospital, playing a Puerto Rican singer.

In late 1999, after releasing several albums in Spanish, Martin performed “The Cup of Life” at the 41st Grammy Awards show, which became a catalyst in bringing Latin pop to the forefront of the U.S. music scene. Following its success, Martin released “Livin’ la Vida Loca” which helped him obtain enormous success worldwide and is generally seen as the song that began the Latin pop explosion of 1999 and made the transition easier for other Spanish-speaking artists to move into the English-speaking market. Since its release, the song has sold over 8 million copies, making it one of the best selling singles of all time. His first English-language album (also titled Ricky Martin), has sold 22 million copies and is one of the best selling albums of all time. His other studio albums include: Me Amarás (1993), A Medio Vivir (1995), Vuelve (1998), Sound Loaded (2000), Almas del Silencio (2003), Life (2005), and Música + Alma + Sexo (2011).

He has sold over 70 million albums (the most updated figure is 85 million), and has had 95 platinum records, six #1 Billboard albums, 11 Number 1 hit songs, two American Music Awards, six Grammy Awards, eight World Music Awards, ten Billboard Music Awards, eight MTV Music Video Awards, with concerts in more than 60 countries across the globe.
Martin was born on December 24, 1971, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the son of Nereida Morales, an accountant, and Enrique Martín Negroni, a psychologist.His parents divorced when he was two years old and Martin spent much of his childhood shifting between his father’s home in the suburbs of University Gardens and his paternal grandmother’s house nearby. Martin has two maternal half-brothers, Fernando and Ángel Fernández, and two paternal half-brothers, Eric and Daniel Martín, and a paternal half-sister Vanessa Martín. Martin has Spanish ancestry through his maternal grandmother who was born in Spain, as well as Corsican ancestry through his paternal grandmother.

Martin grew up in a Roman Catholic home and was an altar boy throughout his childhood. He began singing at age six, using wooden kitchen spoons as pretend microphones; he often interpreted songs by Menudo as well as English-language rock groups such as Led Zeppelin, Journey, and REO Speedwagon. His mother’s side of the family was musically inclined and his maternal grandfather was a poet, which inspired young Martin to write songs. Martin later reflected on his time spent with his family as a child: “Every time I find myself in front of an audience, be it twenty people or one hundred thousand, once again I feel the energy that consumed me back at the family gatherings of my youth.” After discovering a newspaper advertisement about auditions for commercials with his father, nine-year-old Martin began appearing in Puerto Rican television commercials for products such as soft drinks, toothpaste, and fast-food restaurants.ricky martin In a year and a half, he starred in eleven commercials

Menudo “Rayo de Luna” (1984)
At age thirteen, Martin made his recording debut on the song “Rayo de Luna”, from Menudo’s 1984 album, Evolución.

After achieving a small amount of fame in Puerto Rico for his work in television commercials, Martin auditioned for membership in Puerto Rican boy band Menudo. Although the executives enjoyed his dancing and singing at his first two auditions, Martin was rejected because he was too short. By the third audition, his persistence impressed executives and in 1984, thirteen-year-old Martin became a member. A month after joining Menudo, he made his debut performance with the group at the Luis A. Ferré Performing Arts Center in San Juan. During this performance, he inadvertently disobeyed the choreography by walking around the stage when it was planned that he would stay still, and was chastised by the band manager after the show: “The mistake was such a big deal that from that moment on, never again did I move when I wasn’t supposed to move…That was the discipline of Menudo: You either did things the way you were told or you were not part of the group.”[24] The song “Asignatura Pendiente” from Almas del Silencio (2003) was inspired by the first time Martin left Puerto Rico to tour with Menudo.

Although Martin enjoyed traveling and performing onstage with Menudo, he found the band’s busy schedule and strict managing to be exhausting and later reflected that the experience “cost” him his childhood. He considered leaving the group while on tour in Brazil, but ultimately decided to stay out of fear of media backlash and being sued for breach of contract. Martin also began struggling with his sexuality, noting the stark contrast between his status as a sex symbol and his own emotions. Despite this, Martin acknowledged his “opportunity to have so many amazing experiences with so many amazing people” during his time with the group. He developed an interest in philanthropy when the group became UNICEF ambassadors, often working with impoverished children in third world countries. His experiences as an ambassador affected him greatly and inspired him to continue working with charities later in life. By 1987, Menudo’s record sales began to decline and the group changed its image, adopting an edgier look and performing more rock-influenced songs. The band released the album Somos Los Hijos del Rock in Spanish, and to appeal to the Menudo’s Filipino fanbase, the group released In Action, recording songs in both English and Tagalog.

ricky martin

After recording eleven albums with the group, Martin left Menudo in July 1989 at age seventeen, hoping to rest and evaluate his career path. He performed his final show with the group at the same venue as his first performance as a member. Martin returned to Puerto Rico to graduate from high school, and thirteen days after turning eighteen, he moved to New York City to celebrate his financial independence; since he was a minor during his time as a member of Menudo, Martin was not allowed to access his own bank accounts. He was accepted into New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, but months before classes began, Martin dropped out and moved to Mexico City to perform in the play Mama Ama el Rock (Mom Loves Rock)
Acting and first two solo albums: 1991–1994

While he was performing in onstage in Mama Ama el Rock, a producer in the audience took notice of Martin’s acting and offered him a role in the Mexican telenovela Alcanzar una estrella after the show. He also joined the cast for the second season of the show, titled Alcanzar una estrella II. A film based on the TV series entitled Más que alcanzar una estrella was also produced in which Martin starred and earned an El Heraldo Award in 1993 for his role. The show centered around a fictional musical group called Muñecos de Papel in which Martin played Pablo Loredo, one of the six members; the group toured several cities in Mexico and recorded two albums. Although he had hoped to take a break from touring after Menudo, Martin enjoyed the experience because he got along with the other members well.

I was so excited about getting back into the music world that I didn’t care what the conditions were…All of the hard work and passion I had exerted was finally now starting to come to fruition, and music came back to my life powerfully and definitively.

– Martin, on recording his debut album.

In 1990, Martin was signed to Sony Discos, the Sony Music Entertainment’s Latin imprint. Eager to make his first solo album, Martin signed the contract without reading it and inadvertently signed a deal in which he would only be awarded one cent of royalties for each album sold.[36] Despite viewing the contract as unfair, Martin referred to the record as “the start of something phenomenal” for him.[36] After working “around the clock” to finish filming Alcanzar una estrella II and recording music, Martin released his debut solo album, the Spanish-language Ricky Martin, in November 1991. Ricky Martin included the singles: “Fuego Contra Fuego” and “El Amor de Mi Vida”. “Fuego Contra Fuego” was certified Gold in Mexico, Argentina, Puerto Rico, and the United States. To promote the album, Martin toured throughout Latin America, which the singer referred to as “an indescribable feeling, almost like coming home.”

After the success of Ricky Martin and its subsequent tour, Martin’s record company met him with acclaimed producer Juan Carlos Calderón on his second solo album, Me Amarás. Although Martin felt “very grateful” for the opportunity to work with Calderón, he noted, “I always felt that that record was more his than mine.” Released in May 1993, Me Amarás features a Spanish-language cover of the Laura Branigan song “Self Control”, titled “Que Dia Es Hoy”. In his review, Alex Henderson of AllMusic wrote, “The CD isn’t without its pleasures…but on the whole, Me Amarás is too glossy, too calculated, and much too contrived for its own good.”

In 1994, Martin’s agent encouraged him to move to Los Angeles to act in an American sitcom called Getting By.[41] The show was canceled after two seasons, but soon after, Martin was given the role of singer/bartender Miguel Morez on the soap opera General Hospital.[42] Martin felt that he lacked chemistry with the rest of the General Hospital cast, and observed that people treated him differently because of his Puerto Rican accent. At the time, it was relatively uncommon for Hispanic people to appear on American television, and people suggested that he take accent reduction classes, which he refused. It was during this time, however, that Martin began his first committed relationship with a man.ricky martin He “stopped fearing his sexuality”, and soon came out to his mother, who was supportive of him. However, after the relationship ended, Martin “locked [his] feelings even deeper inside”, and began dating women again. He recalled, “I already felt it was hard to be a Latino in Hollywood; what could have been more difficult than being Latino and gay.

A Medio Vivir, Vuelve, and breakthrough: 1995–1998

In 1995, Martin refocused on his music career, and began work on his third album, A Medio Vivir. The first single, the ballad “Te Extraño, Te Olvido, Te Amo”, was reminiscent of his earlier work.[47] With the song, Martin furthered his expansion from Latin American and Spanish-speaking audiences to the European and Asian markets.[48] However, the record also made a shift from his traditional ballad-style compositions to a more risky fusion of music centered around traditional Latin sounds, epitomized by the song “Maria”. Taken aback by the starkly different musical style, record label executives felt that the song would ruin Martin’s career.[49] Despite this, “Maria” was chosen as the album’s second single, and became a breakthrough hit, reaching number one in France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, Finland, Italy, Turkey, and the entire continent of South America.[49] With A Medio Vivir, Martin was credited, along with singers Chayanne and Marc Anthony, for popularizing the music of Puerto Rico in Spain.[50] The album has sold over 3 million copies worldwide.

In a 1996 interview with The Miami Herald, Martin expressed an interest in performing on Broadway. Days after the interview was released Martin received a phone call from producer Richard Jay-Alexander, offering him the lead role of Marius Pontmercy in the play Les Misérables. After the conclusion of a worldwide tour in support of A Medio Vivir, Martin returned to New York to appear in the play in an eleven-week run. He greatly enjoyed the experience, calling his time in the play an “honor” and “the role of [his] life”. Martin continued to tour after the conclusion of the show’s run, and noted that his audiences were growing in both size and enthusiasm. In 1997, Martin was invited to the prestigious Sanremo Music Festival in Sanremo, Italy. After landing in Milan, Martin’s scheduled helicopter trip to Sanremo had to be postponed due to poor weather conditions. Hoping to arrive at the festival on time, Martin and his crew drove through the mountainous terrain at over 120 miles per hour. The car then turned too quickly and flipped over. However, “none of us had more than a couple of scratches and bruises” and he arrived at the festival on time by taxi later that day. In the summer of 1997, Martin embarked on a tour of Spain, performing 45 shows in 36 cities.

While on tour, Martin returned to the studio to record his fourth album, Vuelve (1998). He called the experience of touring and recording at the same time “brutal and incredibly intense”. As he was finishing the record, the singer was contacted by FIFA to write a song for the 1998 World Cup; Martin subsequently wrote “La copa de la vida” with K. C. Porter and Draco Rosa. He performed the song at the World Cup final in the Stade de France on July 12, 1998. The performance, which was broadcast to over a billion viewers in 187 countries, was described as a “global moment for Latin pop”. “La copa de la vida” reached No. 1 on the charts around the world and went gold and platinum in various countries. It was awarded Pop Song of the Year at the 1999 Lo Nuestro Awards.[60] The title track and the ballad “Perdido Sin Tí” both hit number one on the Hot Latin Songs. Further singles included: “La Bomba”, “Por Arriba, Por Abajo” and “Corazonado”. Vuelve spent twenty-six weeks at number one on the Billboard Top Latin Albums. It became Martin’s first top forty album on the Billboard 200 in the United States, where it was certified platinum by the RIAA. The album also went to number one in Spain and Norway, and sold over eight million copies worldwide.

Martin was nominated for his first Grammy Award for Vuelve in the category of Best Latin Pop Album, and was booked to sing on the 41st Grammy Awards live TV broadcast. His acclaimed performance of “La copa de la vida” earned Martin an unexpected standing ovation and introduced him to the mainstream American audience. Being aware of performing on the Grammy, he said that:”The excitement is more than being nominated for the award. The audience in front of me are people who are hard to pleased.Sting!Madonna!Luciano Pavarotti! To get the acceptance of your peers really means a lot.” Martin won the Grammy Award later that evening,and even superstars Madonna and Sting came to the backstage to congratulate him. His appearance sparked nationwide interest in Latin music. Writing for Billboard on April 24, 1999, Michael Paoletta noted, “In the weeks since [the performance], it seems like every record label exec has been in a heated search for the next Latin hottie.”
Crossover to English: 1999–2002

Ricky MartinLivin’ la Vida Loca” (1999)

After receiving commercial success throughout Asia, Europe, and Latin America, Martin prepared his first English album in 1999 in an attempt to cross over to the United States market.[66] The self-titled album, which debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 and sold 661,000 copies in its first week of release, became the most successful album debut on the Billboard charts by a Hispanic artist.[67] It contained material by writers and producers such as Desmond Child, Diane Warren, William Orbit, George Noriega and his longtime childhood friend Draco Rosa. The album also featured special guests: Madonna on the Spanish-English duet “Be Careful (Cuidado con mi Corazón)” and Meja on “Private Emotion”.[68] Two weeks after the album’s release, Martin was featured on the cover of Time with the title “Latin Music Goes Pop!”.[69] Before the album’s release, Janet Jackson collaborated with Ricky Martin for the Latin American version of “Ask for More”, a promotional single and commercial released as part of an advertising campaign for soft drink company Pepsi.[70][71]

The first and most prominent single was “Livin’ la Vida Loca”, which reached number one in many countries around the world, including the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland and New Zealand. “Livin’ la Vida Loca” is Ricky Martin’s biggest hit. The video for “Livin ‘La Vida Loca” was directed by Wayne Isham and starring model Nina Moric. It was followed by “She’s All I Ever Had” which peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. Both tracks peaked at number one on the Hot Latin Songs. “Livin’ la Vida Loca” is generally seen as the song that began the Latin pop explosion of 1999 and made the transition of other Latin artists (first Jennifer Lopez and Enrique Iglesias, then later Shakira) into the English-speaking market easier. Ricky Martin became one of the top-selling albums of 1999, and was certified 7× platinum in the United States, selling over 22 million copies worldwide. In October 1999, Martin embarked on a very successful year-long Livin’ la Vida Loca Tour.

After this success, a new English-language album, Sound Loaded, was released in November 2000. It debuted at number four on the Billboard 200 and was certified 2× platinum by the RIAA. “She Bangs” and “Nobody Wants to Be Lonely” (duet with Christina Aguilera) peaked at number twelve and thirteen on the Billboard Hot 100, respectively. Both singles reached number one on the Hot Latin Songs. Sound Loaded has sold over 8 million copies worldwide.

In February 2001, Martin released a Spanish greatest hits album entitled La Historia, which went to number one for five weeks on the Billboard Top Latin Albums and debuted at number eighty-three on the Billboard 200. It also topped the chart in Sweden for three weeks. The album contained reworkings of two of his early songs “Fuego Contra Fuego” and “El Amor de Mi Vida”. In November 2001, an English-language greatest hits album, The Best of Ricky Martin was released outside North America. It contained two new remixes of “Amor”.
Almas del Silencio and Life: 2003–2006
Ricky Martin in 2005.

In May 2003, Martin released a new Spanish album Almas del Silencio. The first single, “Tal Vez”, debuted at number one on the Hot Latin Songs and stayed there for eleven weeks becoming the best performing Latin single of the year.[72] Martin said of the new album: “I really needed to go back to focus, to my center, to the beginning. I had the need to search within, and really dig deep, and find those emotions that, because of the adrenaline and the euphoria that I lived for a couple of years, were probably sabotaged.”[73] Almas del Silencio debuted at number twelve on the Billboard 200 and reached number one on the Billboard Top Latin Albums where it stayed for six weeks. The album sold more than one million copies worldwide.[74] The next singles, “Jaleo” and “Y Todo Queda en Nada”, reached number one on the Hot Latin Songs. “Jaleo” also topped the chart in Spain for four weeks.

In October 2005, Martin released his first English-language album since 2000’s Sound Loaded and the tenth album of his career. Most of the songs on the album, called Life, were co-written by Martin. He commented on the album: “I was really in touch with my emotions. I think this album is very multi-layered, just like life is. It’s about feeling anger. It’s about feeling joy. It’s about feeling uncertainty. It’s about feeling. And all my emotions are part of this production.”[75] The album debuted at number six on the Billboard 200. The first single from the album, “I Don’t Care”, featured guest appearances by Fat Joe and Amerie. It peaked at number three on the Hot Dance Club Songs and number sixty-five on the Billboard Hot 100. Another song from the album, “It’s Alright” was re-recorded as a duet with French singer M. Pokora. It was successful in French-speaking countries, reaching number four in France.

Soon after, Martin announced his One Night Only with Ricky Martin tour. Starting in Mexico City, the tour premiered on November 15, 2005. After finishing the first leg which included Latin America and the United States, Martin performed at the 2006 Winter Olympics closing ceremony in Turin. A few days later, he announced the second leg of his world tour, which included Europe and Africa. The second leg started on April 21, 2006 in Manchester, UK, and ended on June 3, 2006 in Tel Aviv, Israel.
MTV Unplugged and a world tour: 2006–2007

On August 17, 2006, Ricky Martin taped his MTV Unplugged concert in Miami. It premiered on MTV Latin America, MTV Tr3s and MTV Puerto Rico in October 2006 and was released on CD and DVD in November 2006. The album was a critical and commercial success. It debuted at number one on the Billboard Top Latin Albums and number thirty-eight on the Billboard 200. At the Latin Grammy Awards of 2008, MTV Unplugged received Latin Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Album and for Best Long Form Music Video. The first single, “Tu Recuerdo” which featured La Mari of Chambao, reached number one for three weeks on the Hot Latin Songs. The next single, “Pégate” peaked at number six on the Hot Dance Club Songs.

On February 19, 2007, Martin began his worldwide Black and White Tour[76] which started with a performance at the José Miguel Agrelot Coliseum in Puerto Rico and concluded with a presentation at the Madison Square Garden in New York City on October 14, 2007.[76] He also recorded a duet with Eros Ramazzotti, “Non siamo soli” which topped the Italian chart for eleven consecutive weeks.
Career break: 2007–2010

After finishing his worldwide tour, Martin took a break from the music industry and focused on his private life. In November 2007, Sony BMG Norte released Ricky Martin Live: Black and White Tour on CD, DVD and Blu-ray Disc. One year later, a Spanish-language greatest hits album was released, entitled 17. It was a summary of seventeen years of Martin’s musical career, which included mostly Spanish-language songs.
Autobiography, Música + Alma + Sexo and Evita: 2010–2013
Martin performing in Chicago on April 19, 2011.

Ricky Martin’s autobiography, Me, was published on November 2, 2010. The book became part of the The New York Times Best Seller list,[77] debuting at number five on the Hardcover Nonfiction list. A Spanish-language edition entitled Yo was published simultaneously.

Martin’s single, “The Best Thing About Me Is You” featuring Joss Stone also premiered on November 2, 2010 and peaked at number seventy-four on the Billboard Hot 100. The Spanish version, “Lo Mejor de Mi Vida Eres Tú” topped the Hot Latin Songs for two weeks. It was followed by a new studio album, Música + Alma + Sexo released on January 31, 2011.[78] It debuted at number three on the Billboard 200 and became the highest charting, primarily-Spanish language album in the United States, since Dreaming of You by Selena.[79] Música + Alma + Sexo also represents the highest ever chart debut on the Billboard 200 for a Sony Music Latin release.[80] It spent two weeks at number one on the Billboard Top Latin Albums. On March 25, 2011, Martin started his Música + Alma + Sexo World Tour, which ended on November 12, 2011. The second single from the album, “Más” was released on April 5, 2011 and peaked at number seven on the Hot Dance Club Songs. “Frío” featuring Wisin & Yandel was chosen as the third single.

ricky martin

17: Greatest Hits was released on July 11, 2011 exclusively in the United Kingdom. Ricky Martin was playing Ché in the Broadway revival of the show Evita, scheduled to begin previews on Broadway in March 2012, ahead of an opening in April 2012. He received mixed reviews.

Martin guest-starred as a Spanish teacher on the Fox TV show Glee episode “The Spanish Teacher” on February 7, 2012. Martin premiered his “Ricky’s Lip Conditioner” lip balm in April 2012 as part of the M.A.C Cosmetics “Ricky and Nicki for Viva Glam” campaign. The advertisements for the range paired him with rapper Nicki Minaj. Martin’s signature is featured on the lip balm packaging.
The Voice Australia, “Come with Me” and an Australian tour: 2013

In November 2012, Martin was announced as a coach on The Voice Australia and debuted in the first episode of season two, on April 7, 2013. The finale aired on June 17. His finalist was former Ten Tenors singer Luke Kennedy. He became Runner-up losing to eventual winner Harrison Craig.

In April 2013, Martin released his Greatest Hits: Souvenir Edition album in Australia, where it reached number two on the ARIA Albums Chart and was certified Gold. In June 2013, he released a new English single titled “Come with Me”.[85] He also embarked on the 2013 Australian Tour in October 2013. In February 2014, he appeared with Jennifer Lopez & Wisin on the single and video “Adrenalina” taken from Wisin’s solo album El Regreso del Sobreviviente. The album version contains Spanish lyrics but the single was also made available in a Spanglish version. In April 2014, the single & video were released for “Vida”, from the FIFA compilation album One Love, One Rhythm – The 2014 FIFA World Cup Official Album. Here, the album version contains Spanglish lyrics, but the digital EP contained versions in Spanish & Portuguese as well as various dance remixes.
The Voice Mexico and Mexican One World Tour: 2014–present

In July 2014, was annouced as a coach on The Voice Mexico along with italian singer Laura Pausini, mexican pop singer Yuri and norteno singer Julión Álvarez[86] The first episode of season four was aired on September 9, 2014.[87] On October 3, 2014, Martin will be starting his Mexican One World Tour on Mexico City, followed by Guadalajara, Monterrey and Chihuahua.[88]
Musical style

Martin possesses a tenor vocal range.[89] Martin cites a variety of the Latin music genres as influences, including salsa, merengue, and bolero.[90] He also is inspired by artists such as the Fania All-Stars, Celia Cruz, El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, and Gilberto Santa Rosa, which his mother played for him as a child.[90] Martin credits these musicians with helping him “appreciate the richness of [his] island’s culture.”[90]

In addition, Martin ever thanked his all-time idols, including Michael Jackson, Cher, Madonna, Elvis Presley, Sting, Barbra Streisand, Daniel Day-Lewis.
Other media

In November 2013 Martin launched Piccolo Universe, an online community for parents and caregivers from all corners of the world to celebrate and share the joys and struggles of raising kids.

Ricky Martin’s first children’s book, Santiago the Dreamer in Land Among the Stars, was published in November 2013. A Spanish-language edition entitled, Santiago El Soñador en Entre Las Estrellas was published simultaneously. The book was illustrated by Patricia Castelao.
Personal life

Martin is known as “Kiki” or “Quiquito” by intimates.[91] Martin was raised Catholic, but says he is open to all sorts of religious beliefs, especially the Buddhist philosophy, although he does not identify as a Buddhist.[92] He feels that subscribing to a specific religion can “limit” an individual in certain aspects, and noted in 2006, “I really like the Buddhist philosophy but that doesn’t mean that I am of the religion. If I subscribe to Buddhism, I can’t be of anything else…I am not going to follow those rules.”[92] Martin began practicing yoga after a trip to Thailand in 1997.

He enjoys surfing, skydiving, and vacationing in the Indian Subcontinent, including in India and Nepal, partly on account of his interest in yoga and Buddhism, in view of the origins of Buddhism and its sacred pilgrimage sites such Bodhgaya, Sarnath and Kushinagar being in India.

In November 2011, he acquired Spanish nationality in recognition of his artistic talents and for having roots in the country – Martin’s grandmother is Spanish, and he owns a residence in Madrid. In September 2011 he sold his home in Miami.[93] In a public statement, written in Spanish, Martin explicitly stated that he has not abandoned his Puerto Rican identity: “I was born in Puerto Rico, I am a Puerto Rican, and Puerto Rico is my country. I made the request for Spanish citizenship some time ago, I was just waiting for a response. This step is part of planning for the future within a global community of whom I am part. Spain is a country with which Ricky Martin shares many memories and strong ties born of my roots and the love they have given me since I first visited.”

Kat DeLuna featuring Elephant Man – Whine Up

Kat Deluna

Kathleen “Kat” Emperatriz DeLuna (born November 26, 1987) is an American R&B singer-songwriter, recording artist and dancer. Born in The Bronx to Dominican parents, DeLuna began pursuing a career as a singer when she was a teenager. After signing with Epic Records, she released her debut single “Whine Up” in 2007. The single went on to become a commercial success, entering the Top 40 in numerous countries and topping the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart. Her debut studio album, 9 Lives (2007), failed to see the success of its lead single. The album’s third single, “Run the Show”, became a hit in various territories, and reached number two on the Hot Dance Club Play chart.

Following the commercial performance of her first album, DeLuna was dropped from Epic Records. De Luna continued to record both collaborations and soundtrack singles. DeLuna later began working on her second studio album, Inside Out (2010), which received a limited release through Universal Music Belgium. The album spawned a number of singles, notably “Unstoppable”, “Push Push”, and “Dancing Tonight” featuring Lil Wayne, Akon, and Fo Onassis respectively. Viva, the North American edition of the album, was slated to be released later that year; however, this never materialized. DeLuna is currently working on her third studio album, Viva Out Loud, slated to be released in 2014.

kat deluna

In 2007, DeLuna won “Best New Artist” at the Los Premios MTV Latinoamérica 2007 awards. In 2008, she won “Best New Artist” and “Best Urban Artist” at the TMF Awards. DeLuna’s single, “Whine Up”, won the award for “Latin Dance Club Play Track Of The Year” at the 2008 Latin Billboard Music Awards. She also won a Casandra Award in 2008 for “Best International Artist”.
DeLuna was born in The Bronx to Dominican parents. At a young age, DeLuna and her family moved to the Dominican Republic. When she was 12, DeLuna performed onstage and was heard by Milly Quezada who commended her vocals. Friends and family recognized her talent at an early age, but it was not until she moved back to the United States at age 14, to Newark, New Jersey, that DeLuna realized her potential as a singer. She attended Benjamin Franklin Elementary in Newark, and was taught by Nicholas Straus. DeLuna then attended the Newark Arts High School, which was the only school she applied to.[4] While there, DeLuna and her friends formed an R&B group called Coquette. DeLuna had a tough upbringing and was raised in poverty. She spent her time listening to Aretha Franklin and Billie Holiday records, which she imitated daily on her karaoke machine.

At age 15, DeLuna entered a Coca-Cola sponsored karaoke competition. Her version of “I Will Always Love You” took first place. It was through this competition that she met Cuban salsa singer Rey Ruiz. Ruiz gave DeLuna this advice: “Nobody knows you better than you do, and nobody can help you if you can’t help yourself.” DeLuna began writing her own music and has continued to do so. In 2004, while DeLuna was 17, Coquette opened for a Cassidy concert in New Jersey. In 2006, DeLuna chose to pursue a solo career and was signed by Epic Records.
Music career
2007–08: Early success with 9 Lives

After being signed to Epic Records, DeLuna began working with producers such as RedOne and Jane’t Sewell-Ulepic, among others. The two worked together to produce the majority of the songs on DeLuna’s debut album. On May 15, 2007, DeLuna released her debut single, “Whine Up”.[6] The title comes from the Caribbean English pronunciation of Wind up, meaning to move one’s hips on the dance floor. The single received mixed reviews from critics. A reviewer from TodaysMusic gave the song a mixed review: “The song itself is great musically. It has all the ingredients of a hot dance song. I love the driving Latin sound of the chorus. But Kat, you’re 19 as of this writing. You’re writing about very sensual things. Is this what you want to tell the young girls from your neighborhood? Is this what you give your parents after all their encouragement and support as you studied music diligently all your life? Reminds me of Rihanna- wanting to be a good example to young girls, but really not being one at all.” AssociatedContent had a more positive review of the song, stating “On the song Kat goes back forth between singing in English and Spanish. The song is catchy and fills a void currently in the marketplace. Elephant Man adds his traditional high energy approach and the song is a surefire hit.” Billboard also spoke highly of the song, claiming “Talk about a summertime sure thing. Nineteen-year-old Dominican Kat Deluna is prepped to combust with a platinum-plated debut so certain you can practically smell the smoke emanating from its juicy one-spin hook and manic tempo. Accompanied by reggaeton queen Ivy Queen and dancehall staple Elephant Man, aka the Energy God, the bilingual crossover beauty – who grew up in poverty in the Dominican Republic and the Bronx before studying music at the New Jersey School of Performing Arts – combines Caribbean cadence with a novel mesh of hip-hip, R&B and merengue. Deluna’s launch single offers ultimate seasonal sizzle – over the airwaves, on the beach, down the highway and across dance floors. A “Whine” to be heard loud and proud the world over.” The single experienced commercial success. In the US, the single debuted at number 24 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 singles chart. In the following weeks, the song would continue climbing the charts until it reached a peak of number 29, becoming her only US Top 40 hit. The single also topped the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart, which monitors plays songs in night clubs. The single peaked at number 43 on the Hot Latin Songs chart. On the Hot R&B Hip-Hop Songs, the single peaked at number 12. It reached the Top 20 of the Pop 100, peaking at number 14.The single charted well internationally; it reached the Top 20 of the Canadian Hot 100, peaking at number 15, as well as reaching a peak of number 7 in Belgium and France. The single peaked at number 18 on the Australian ARIA Charts, and at number 13 on the Romanian Singles Chart.

De Luna‘s debut album, 9 Lives, was released on August 7, 2007. The album peaked at number fifty-eight on the Billboard 200, selling 11,000 copies in its first week. The album has since sold near 200,000 copies in the United States. The album was also well received commercially in the international market. In Belgium, the album debuted inside the Top 20, peaking at number 16. The album reached the Top 20 in Finland, where it peaked at number 15 on the official album chart. In France, the album debuted at number 24. On the Ö3 Austria Top 40 chart, the album peaked at number 64. The album was successful in Poland, where it peaked at number 12 on the official albums chart. DeLuna chose to release “Am I Dreaming” as the second single. It began receiving airplay on Latin radio stations, leading to its peak of 26 on the U.S. Billboard Latin Tropical Airplay chart. Despite its early success in the Latin music industry, further plans for the single were immediately scrapped for unknown reasons, and a new single has yet to be chosen.
DeLuna performing in 2007

At the Los Premios MTV Latinoamérica 2007 awards show, DeLuna won the Best New Artist award. In late 2007, DeLuna collaborated with Omarion on the single “Cut Off Time”, which was the lead single from the Feel the Noise soundtrack. The song peaked at number 23 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles and at number 123 on the Hot 100. In December 2007 DeLuna announced that “Run the Show” would be the second single. It was released on January 15, 2008, for radio airplay. The US version of the song features rapper Busta Rhymes, while the international release of the single features Don Omar. The version on the album is different again, with guest vocals from Shaka Dee. The single has become one of DeLuna’s biggest hits to date. “Run the Show” reached the Top 10 in several countries, including Finland, where it peaked at number 2; Belgium, where it reached number 5; and Romania, where it peaked at number 8. In the US, the failed to chart on the Hot 100. It did, however, peak at number 17 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 singles chart. Despite its failure on the Hot 100, the single managed to rise to number 2 on the Hot Dance Club Play chart, only one spot lower than “Whine Up”. After the release of “Run the Show”, the album was re-released on Akon’s record label. Due to the poor performance of the single in the US, plans for the album’s re-release in America were scrapped.

kat deluna

At the 2008 TMF Awards in Belgium, DeLuna won awards for Best New Artist and Best Urban Artist. At the Latin Billboard Music Awards 2008, DeLuna won the “Latin Dance Club Play Track Of The Year” Award for her single “Whine Up”. Shortly after the award shows, it was announced that “In the End” would be released as the third international single. The single was her first to receive no release whatsoever in the US. Due to a lack of promotion, the single failed to make an impact on music charts. In Belgium, it peaked at number 31 on the official singles chart. In October 2008, “Breathing Your Love”, a collaboration with Swedish singer Darin Zanyar, was released and went on to reach number 2 in Sweden and number 13 in Finland. DeLuna was dropped from Epic Records in 2008, and signed a record deal with Universal Motown. She began work on her second album, and premiered a new song, “Calling You”, on her MySpace page and her official website in 2008.

In September 2008 DeLuna’s performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at a Dallas Cowboys Monday Night Football game against the Philadelphia Eagles was roundly booed. The crowd felt that DeLuna’s vocals were “scathing” and overwrought. The event garnered much media attention, and landed the number one-spot on Billboard Magazine’s “10 Worst National Anthem Performances Ever” in 2010.
2009–2011: Move to Universal Music and Inside Out

In January 2009, DeLuna released “Unstoppable”, featuring Lil Wayne, as a single from the Confessions of a Shopaholic soundtrack. The song was originally due to be the lead single from her second album but its release was cancelled. The music video for “Unstoppable” premiered on Kat DeLuna’s MySpace profile on January 23, 2009. The song was released for radio airplay on February 24, 2009. In Canada, “Unstoppable” peaked at number 80 on the Canadian Hot 100.

In April 2009, DeLuna announced the album’s title, Inside Out. In May 2009 DeLuna released “Dance Bailalo” as a digital-only promotional single. The song had a generally positive reception. Letssingit said of the song, “[Bailalo] demonstrates DeLuna’s innovative new sound by blending tropical samba rhythms with new school dance melodies. This infectious combination paired with her seductive lyrics lure listeners to let loose and hit the dance floor hard.” Internet blogger Perez Hilton commented on the song as well, saying “(‘Dance Bailalo’ is) one of the most scorching dance singles we’ve heard all year!” Hilton called the song the next “Summer Jam”. The single failed to chart on the Hot 100, but reached number 2 on the Hot Dance Club Play chart. It entered the top 20 on Latin charts, where it peaked at number 12.

In June 2009, DeLuna performed alongside Shontelle at New York City’s Fashion Industries High School prom as the star of My Prom Style’s official website feature, the “Ultimate Prom” fashion reality series. Three aspiring teen designers competed to design a dress to wear to the prom, and a pattern of the winning dress was then produced and sold nationwide by Simplicity Patterns. In February 2010, DeLuna participated in a Spanish remake of “We Are the World” called “Somos El Mundo”, alongside other Dominican singers such as Juan Luis Guerra, Milly Quezada, Eddy Herrera, Romeo (Aventura), Fernando Villalona and Latin artists such as Paulina Rubio, Thalia, Belinda, Luis Fonsi, and Chayanne, among others. The piece was a fundraiser for victims of the 2010 Haiti Earthquake. Also in 2009, DeLuna recorded a track titled “Shake It Up” with Big Ali for his album Louder. The single was a commercial failure, failing to chart on any charts worldwide.

In April 2010, DeLuna released “Push Push” featuring Akon,[35] the lead single from her second album. During her mini promotional tour in Belgium and France in September, DeLuna signed a new contract with Universal Music Belgium. When asked of how the song with Akon came about, DeLuna said it was an accident. When they ran into each other at the studio one day, “He said, ‘I have something I wanna show you,'” DeLuna said. “He played the beat and I went crazy.” The single was a critical success. The New York Daily News wrote, “The [song] is a simple, fun and insanely catchy song with a multilayered oh-oh-oh refrain by DeLuna, a solid contribution from Akon on the bridge and a thumping beat that’s sure to bring the house down at the club.” MTV compared the song to recent releases by Lady Gaga, saying, “Push Push,” the first single from DeLuna’s Inside Out album starts out with some “oh-oh-oh’s” that wouldn’t sound out of place on a Gaga record. “Push Push” was produced by Radio, but it still contains some of RedOne’s signature sounds.” The single achieved some commercial success internationally. It debuted and peaked at number 84 on the Canadian Hot 100, mainly due to digital downloads. The single achieved greater success in Europe, where it peaked at number 37. In Belgium, “Push” became her third Top 20 hit on the singles chart, when it peaked at number 15. The single became her first Top 10 hit in France since “Run the Show”, peaking at number 9.

DeLuna announced on Twitter that the second single from the album would be “Party O’ Clock”. On October 22 the single was released on iTunes. On November 2, DeLuna released a video premiering her release of Inside Out in Belgium and confirmed the tracklisting for the album. Inside Out was released on November 5, 2010, in Belgium. It was commercially successful in the country, debuting and peaking at number 16 on the official album’s chart. The video for “Party O’Clock” was released on December 15, 2010. “Dancing Tonight” was the next single from the album, and she shot video in New York City on December 21–23, 2010. “Dancing Tonight” debuted as the #1 Breakout on the Billboard Dance Chart. The video for the song premiered on March 23. On July 29 the video for the single Drop It Low premiered on her YouTube channel, and the single was released September 27. “Drop it Low” first surfaced on DeLuna’s international-only release ‘Inside Out,’ which is being re-worked for the American album that will be called ‘Viva.’ The song is produced by Belgian producer “Eightysix”, who has been responsible for her single “Dancing Tonight” as well, which hit #1 on the Billboard Dance Chart in the US and #36 overall for most played dance song on the 2011 Billboard Year End Dance Chart.

kat deluna

Shortly after Jennifer Lopez released her single “On the Floor” on February 22, 2011, many of DeLuna’s fans, as well as critics, claimed that “On the Floor” plagiarised DeLuna’s 2010 single “Party O’Clock”. In a statement issued to the New York Daily News, DeLuna said “It’s cool that artists like J.Lo are inspired by my musical sound and style. … Jennifer helped pave the way for Latinas like myself. I love her”, and insisted that there was not an issue. Following previews of the music video for “On the Floor,” DeLuna changed her mind about how she felt with the claims of copying. In another interview with the New York Daily News, several days after the first, she said “I’ve seen this before, where the more established artist tries to take the vision and artistic ideas away from an emerging artist, and assumes no one will notice because of their bigger shadow,… Luckily, my loyal fans and the power of the Internet have let the ‘Kat’ out of the bag”. DeLuna had previously said she was inspired by Lopez, and saw her as someone who opened doors for people like her to sing. When Lopez was asked about the issue on the Latin-American entertainment program Despierta America, she replied, “What? Really? I’m not aware of that…,” and when asked a second time, she insisted she had not heard about the comparisons. It was alleged that “J.Lo’s camp specifically requested that nothing about the DeLuna debacle be brought up during the interview.”
2012–present: Viva Out Loud

On July 11, 2012, Kat DeLuna released her new Spanish single, “Sobredosis” (Feat. El Cata) on her official YouTube account. On August 21, 2012, Kat DeLuna premiered her new music video, “Wanna See U Dance” on On Air with Ryan Seacrest from her upcoming 3rd album, “ViVa Out Loud”. Also the same day the single became available to buy on iTunes. On August 24, 2012, Vevo released “Wanna See U Dance” music video on Kat DeLuna official Vevo account. “Sobredosis” (Feat. El Cata) became available on iTunes September 10, 2012. In 2013, she released a new single for the album, “Stars”.

Dazz Band – Live Performance !

Dazz Band

is an American funk music band that was most popular in the early 1980s. Emerging from Cleveland, Ohio, the group’s biggest hit songs include the Grammy Award-winning “Let It Whip” (1982), “Joystick” (1983), and “Let It All Blow” (1984). The name of the band is a portmanteau of the description “danceable jazz”.
The Dazz Band, formed in 1976, grew out of the Cleveland, Ohio, jazz fusion band Bell Telefunk. Founded by Bobby Harris, lead guitarist/songwriter Original Kinsman Dazz/ Dazz Band member Michael J.Calhoun, percussionist Kenny Pettus, drummer Isaac “Ike” Wiley, Jr., and his brother bassist, and Michael Wiley.[citation needed] The group became known as Kinsman Dazz, named after both the street and the lounge where they worked as the house band: Sonny Jones’ Kinsman Grill Lounge. The group adopted its name before the song “Dazz” became an R&B hit for Atlanta’s Brick in 1976.

dazz band

Kinsman Dazz was signed to 20th Century Records by Joe Lewis[disambiguation needed] in 1978. The group went to Los Angeles to record for producer Marvin Gaye. Due to illness, Gaye had to back out of the duties. Bobby Harris requested and got Philip Bailey, the vocalist of Earth, Wind & Fire, to produce the group’s first album, Kinsman Dazz. Bailey would co-produce the second album, Dazz, and had a major input into the group’s vocal arrangements. They released their first single, “I Might as Well Forget About Loving You”, in late 1978. “Catchin’ Up on You” followed in 1979.

The Kinsman Dazz became the Dazz Band in 1980. Separately, the 20th Century Records label was closed, and the Dazz Band was signed to Motown Records. The group expanded from the original quintet – Calhoun,Harris,Pettus, and the Wiley brothers and added newcomers Kevin Kendrick, Eric Fearman, Pierre DeMudd, Sennie “Skip” Martin, Jerry Bell, & Terry Stanten.They had their first hit with “Shake It Up” in 1980.

Dazz’s first album for Motown was Invitation to Love (1980), a self-produced set, whose title track, the ballad “Invitation to Love”, began a string of hits for the band starting in March 1981. The group’s next album, Let The Music Play (1981), featured the minor hit single “Knock! Knock!”, reaching the Top 50. The group’s biggest breakthrough came with the album Keep It Live (1982), containing the hit “Let It Whip” — which reached No. 1 on the R&B charts and won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. They would go on to score R&B hits with the songs “Party Right Here” (1983), “Joystick” (1984), and “Let It All Blow” (which was also their biggest UK hit single, peaking at #12) (1984).

After Keep It Live, the band recorded the albums On the One, Joystick, Jukebox and Hot Spot, all for Motown. The band was known for its live performances, often proving more popular than the headlining act. In 1985, Fearman left the group and was replaced by Marlon McClain and Keith Harrison. In 1986, Dazz Band recorded Wild & Free for Geffen Records, and moved to RCA Records.
1990s revival

The popularity of classic funk,R&B,soul acts performing in the US and abroad started to expand in the mid-1990s, on events such as the Sinbad’s Summer Jam: ’70s Soul Music Festival. Bobby Harris decided to form a tribute band with members from the Bar-Kays, Con Funk Shun, the Gap Band and the SOS Band, called the ‘United We Funk All-Stars’. A studio album followed, including a tribute to the late Roger Troutman, who performed on the album as well. Other artists from the genre who contributed to the album were Rick James and The System. The concept was a success, and was captured on a live CD, presented and promoted by radio jockey Dean Sorensen, who made the announcements on the UWF-All Stars shows.
Members:
Current members

Bobby Harris – saxophone, clarinet, background vocals
Sennie Skip Martin – trumpet, vocals
Marlon McClain – vocals and guitars

Past members

Juan Lively
Jerry Bell
Steve Cox
Pierre DeMudddazz band
Eric Fearman
Keith Harrison
Kenny Pettus
Terry Stanton
Michael Wiley
Isaac Wiley, Jr
Derrick Murdock
Michael Calhoun
Kevin Kendrick

Dazz Band.

Michael Jackson HIStory Tour Live In Munich

Michael Jackson

Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actor. Called the King of Pop, his contributions to music, dance, and fashion, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.

The eighth child of the Jackson family, he debuted on the professional music scene along with his elder brothers Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon as a member of The Jackson 5 in 1964, and began his solo career in 1971. In the early 1980s, Jackson became a dominant figure in popular music. The music videos for his songs, including those of “Beat It”, “Billie Jean”, and “Thriller”, were credited with breaking down racial barriers and with transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool. The popularity of these videos helped to bring the then-relatively-new television channel MTV to fame. With videos such as “Black or White” and “Scream”, he continued to innovate the medium throughout the 1990s, as well as forging a reputation as a touring solo artist. Through stage and video performances, Jackson popularized a number of complicated dance techniques, such as the robot and the moonwalk, to which he gave the name. His distinctive sound and style has influenced numerous hip hop, post-disco, contemporary R&B, pop, and rock artists.

Jackson‘s 1982 album Thriller is the best-selling album of all time. His other albums, including Off the Wall (1979), Bad (1987), Dangerous (1991), and HIStory (1995), also rank among the world’s best-selling. Jackson is one of the few artists to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice. He was also inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame and the Dance Hall of Fame as the first and only dancer from pop and rock music. His other achievements include multiple Guinness World Records; 13 Grammy Awards as well as the Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award; 26 American Music Awards, more than any other artist, including the “Artist of the Century” and “Artist of the 1980s”; 13 number-one singles in the United States in his solo career, more than any other male artist in the Hot 100 era; and the estimated sale of over 400 million records worldwide. Jackson has won hundreds of awards, making him the most-awarded recording artist in the history of popular music. In what would have been Jackson’s 52nd birthday on August 29, 2010, he became the most downloaded artist of all time in Nokia Music Store. Jackson became the first artist in history to have a top ten single in the Billboard Hot 100 in five different decades when “Love Never Felt So Good” reached number nine on May 21, 2014. Jackson traveled the world attending events honoring his humanitarianism and in 2000, the Guinness World Records recognized him for supporting 39 charities, more than any other entertainer.

Aspects of Jackson’s personal life, including his changing appearance, personal relationships, and behavior, generated controversy. In the mid-1990s, he was accused of child sexual abuse, but the case was settled out of court for about $25 million and no formal charges were brought. In 2005, he was tried and acquitted of further child sexual abuse allegations and several other charges after the jury found him not guilty on all counts. While preparing for his comeback concert series titled This Is It, Jackson died of acute propofol and benzodiazepine intoxication on June 25, 2009, after suffering from cardiac arrest. The Los Angeles County Coroner ruled his death a homicide, and his personal physician Conrad Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter. Jackson’s death triggered a global outpouring of grief and a live broadcast of his public memorial service was viewed around the world.

michael jackson
1958–75: Early life and The Jackson 5:
The single-storey house has white walls, two windows, a central white door with a black door frame, and a black roof. In front of the house there is a walk way and multiple colored flowers and memorabilia.
Jackson’s childhood home in Gary, Indiana, showing floral tributes after his death

Michael Joseph Jackson was born on August 29, 1958. He was the eighth of ten children in an African-American working-class family who lived in a two-bedroom house in Gary, Indiana, an industrial city and a part of the Chicago metropolitan area. His mother, Katherine Esther Scruse, was a devout Jehovah’s Witness. She once aspired to be a country and western performer who played clarinet and piano, but worked part-time at Sears to help support the family. His father, Joseph Walter “Joe” Jackson, a former boxer, was a steelworker at U.S. Steel. Joe also performed on guitar with a local R&B band called The Falcons to supplement the family’s household income. Michael grew up with three sisters (Rebbie, La Toya, and Janet) and five brothers (Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon, and Randy). A sixth brother, Marlon’s elder twin Brandon, died shortly after birth.

Jackson had a troubled relationship with his father, Joe. In 2003, Joe acknowledged that he regularly whipped Jackson as a boy. Joe was also said to have verbally abused his son, often saying that he had a “fat nose”. Jackson stated that he was physically and emotionally abused during incessant rehearsals, though he also credited his father’s strict discipline with playing a large role in his success. Speaking openly about his childhood in an interview with Oprah Winfrey, broadcast in February 1993, Jackson acknowledged that his youth had been lonely and isolating. Jackson’s deep dissatisfaction with his appearance, his nightmares and chronic sleep problems, his tendency to remain hyper-compliant, especially with his father, and to remain childlike throughout his adult life, are consistent with the effects of the maltreatment he endured as a young child.

In an interview with Martin Bashir, later included in the 2003 broadcast of Living with Michael Jackson, Jackson acknowledged that his father hurt him when he was a child, recalling that Joseph often sat in a chair with a belt in his hand as he and his siblings rehearsed, and that “if you didn’t do it the right way, he would tear you up, really get you.”
Jackson (center) as a member of The Jackson 5 in 1972

In 1965, Michael and Marlon joined the Jackson Brothers—a band formed by their father and which included brothers Jackie, Tito, and Jermaine—as backup musicians playing congas and tambourine. In 1966, Jackson began sharing lead vocals with his older brother Jermaine, and the group’s name was changed to The Jackson 5. That following year, the group won a major local talent show with Jackson performing James Brown’s “I Got You (I Feel Good)”. From 1966 to 1968 the band toured the Midwest, frequently performing at a string of black clubs known as the “chitlin’ circuit” as the opening act for R&B artists that included Sam and Dave, The O’Jays, Gladys Knight, and Etta James. The Jackson 5 also performed at clubs and cocktail lounges, where striptease shows and other adult acts were featured, and at local auditoriums and high school dances. In August 1967, while touring the East coast, the group won a weekly amateur night content at The Apollo Theater in Harlem.

The Jackson 5 recorded several songs, including “Big Boy” (1968), their first single, for Steeltown Records, a Gary, Indiana, record label,before signing with Motown Records in 1969. The Jackson 5 left Gary in 1969 and relocated to the Los Angeles area, where they continued to record music for Motown. Rolling Stone magazine later described the young Michael as “a prodigy” with “overwhelming musical gifts,” writing that he “quickly emerged as the main draw and lead singer.” The group set a chart record when its first four singles—”I Want You Back” (1969), “ABC” (1970), “The Love You Save” (1970), and “I’ll Be There” (1970)—peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. In May 1971, the Jackson family moved into a large home on two-acre estate in Encino, California, where Michael evolved from child performer into a teen idol. As Jackson began to emerge as a solo performer in the early 1970s, he continued to maintain ties to The Jackson 5 and Motown. Between 1972, when his solo career began, and 1975, Michael released four solo studio albums with Motown: Got to Be There (1972), Ben (1972), Music and Me (1973), and Forever Michael (1975). “Got to Be There” and “Ben”, the title tracks from his first two solo albums, produced successful singles, as did a remake of Bobby Day’s “Rockin’ Robin”.

The Jackson 5 were later described as “a cutting-edge example of black crossover artists.” Although the group’s sales began declining in 1973, and the band members chafed under Motown’s refusal to allow them creative control or input, they continued to score several top 40 hits, including the top five single, “Dancing Machine” (1974), before the group left Motown in 1975.
1975–81: Move to Epic and Off the Wall

In June 1975, the Jackson 5 signed with Epic Records, a subsidiary of CBS Records, and renamed themselves the Jacksons. Younger brother Randy formally joined the band around this time, while Jermaine chose to stay with Motown and pursue a solo career. The Jacksons continued to tour internationally, and released six more albums between 1976 and 1984. Michael, the group’s lead songwriter during this time, wrote hits such as “Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)” (1979), “This Place Hotel” (1980), and “Can You Feel It” (1980). Jackson’s work in film began in 1978, when he starred as the Scarecrow in The Wiz, a musical directed by Sidney Lumet that also starred Diana Ross, Nipsey Russell, and Ted Ross. The film was a box-office disaster. While working on the film Jackson met Quincy Jones, who was arranging the film’s musical score, and Jones agreed to produce Jackson’s next solo album, Off the Wall. In 1979, Jackson broke his nose during a complex dance routine. His subsequent rhinoplasty was not a complete success; he complained of breathing difficulties that would affect his career. He was referred to Dr. Steven Hoefflin, who performed Jackson’s second rhinoplasty and subsequent operations.

michael jackson

Off the Wall (1979), which Jones and Jackson co-produced, established Jackson as a solo performer. The album helped Jackson transition from the “bubblegum pop” of his youth to the more complex sounds he would create as an adult. Songwriters for the album included Jackson, Rod Temperton, Stevie Wonder, and Paul McCartney. Off the Wall was the first solo album to generate four top 10 hits in the United States: “Off the Wall”, “She’s Out of My Life”, and the chart-topping singles “Don’t Stop ’til You Get Enough” and “Rock with You”. The album reached number three on the Billboard 200 and eventually sold over 20 million copies worldwide. In 1980, Jackson won three awards at the American Music Awards for his solo efforts: Favorite Soul R&B Album, Favorite Soul R&B Male Artist, and Favorite Soul R&B Single for “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough”. He also won Billboard Year-End awards for Top Black Artist and Top Black Album, and a Grammy Award for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance for 1979 with “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough”. In 1981 Jackson was the American Music Awards winner for Favorite Soul R&B Album and Favorite Soul R&B Male Artist.Despite its commercial success, Jackson felt Off the Wall should have made a much bigger impact, and was determined to exceed expectations with his next release. In 1980, he secured the highest royalty rate in the music industry: 37 percent of wholesale album profit.
1982–83: Thriller and Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever

In 1982 Jackson combined his interests in songwriting and film when he contributed the song “Someone In the Dark” to the storybook for the film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. The song, with Quincy Jones as its producer, won a Grammy for Best Recording for Children for 1983. Even more success came after the release of Thriller in late 1982. The album earned Jackson seven more Grammys[57] and eight American Music Awards, including the Award of Merit, the youngest artist to win it.

“Thriller” was the best-selling album worldwide in 1983. It became the best-selling album of all time in the United States, and the best-selling album of all time worldwide, selling an estimated 65 million copies.The album topped the Billboard 200 chart for 37 weeks and was in the top 10 of the 200 for 80 consecutive weeks. It was the first album to have seven Billboard Hot 100 top 10 singles, including “Billie Jean”, “Beat It”, and “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin'”. In March 2009 Thriller was certified for 29 million shipments by the RIAA, giving it Double Diamond status in the United States. Thriller won Jackson and Quincy Jones the Grammy award for Producer of the Year (Non-Classical) for 1983. It also won Album of the Year, with Jackson as the album’s artist and Jones as its co-producer, and a Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, award for Jackson. “Beat It” won Record of the Year, with Jackson as artist and Jones as co-producer, and a Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male, award for Jackson. “Billie Jean” won Jackson two Grammy awards, Best R&B Song, with Jackson as its songwriter, and Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male, as its artist. Thriller also won another Grammy for Best Engineered Recording – Non Classical in 1984, awarding Bruce Swedien for his work on the album. The AMA Awards for 1984 provided Jackson with an Award of Merit and AMAs for Favorite Male Artist, Soul R&B, and Favorite Male Artist, Pop/Rock. “Beat It” won Jackson AMAs for Favorite Video, Soul R&B, Favorite Video, Pop Rock, and Favorite Single, Pop Rock. Thriller won him AMAs for Favorite Album, Soul R&B, and Favorite Album, Pop Rock.

In addition to the award-winning album, Jackson released “Thriller”, a fourteen-minute music video short directed by John Landis, in 1983. It “defined music videos and broke racial barriers” on the Music Television Channel (MTV), a fledgling entertainment television channel at the time. In December 2009, the Library of Congress selected music video for “Thriller” for inclusion in the National Film Registry. It was one of twenty-five films named that year as “works of enduring importance to American culture” that would be “preserved for all time.” The zombie-themed “Thriller” is the first and, as of 2009, the only music video to be inducted into the registry.

Jackson’s attorney John Branca noted that Jackson had the highest royalty rate in the music industry at that point: approximately $2 for every album sold. He was also making record-breaking profits from sales of his recordings. The videocassette of the documentary The Making of Michael Jackson’s Thriller sold over 350,000 copies in a few months. The era saw the arrival of novelties like dolls modeled after Michael Jackson, which appeared in stores in May 1984 at a price of $12. Biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli writes that, “Thriller stopped selling like a leisure item—like a magazine, a toy, tickets to a hit movie—and started selling like a household staple.” In 1985, The Making of Michael Jackson’s Thriller won a Grammy for Best Music Video, Longform. Time described Jackson’s influence at that point as “Star of records, radio, rock video. A one-man rescue team for the music business. A songwriter who sets the beat for a decade. A dancer with the fanciest feet on the street. A singer who cuts across all boundaries of taste and style and color too”. The New York Times wrote that, “in the world of pop music, there is Michael Jackson and there is everybody else”.

A defining point in Michael  Jackson‘s career took place on March 25, 1983, when Michael reunited with his brothers for a legendary live performance, which was taped at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, for Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, an NBC television special. The show aired on May 16, 1983, to an estimated audience of 47 million viewers, and featured the Jacksons and other Motown stars. The show is best remembered for Jackson’s solo performance of “Billie Jean”, which earned Jackson his first Emmy nomination. Wearing a distinctive black-sequined jacket and a golf glove decorated with rhinestones, he debuted his signature dance move, the moonwalk, which former Soul Train dancer and Shalamar member Jeffrey Daniel had taught him three years earlier. Jackson originally turned down the invitation to perform at the show, believing he had been doing too much television at the time. However at the request of Berry Gordy, Jackson relented and agreed to perform at the show in exchange for time to do a solo performance. According to Rolling Stones reporter Mikal Gilmore, “There are times when you know you are hearing or seeing something extraordinary…that came that night.” Jackson’s performance drew comparisons to Elvis Presley’s and The Beatles’ appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. Anna Kisselgoff of The New York Times later wrote, “The moonwalk that he made famous is an apt metaphor for his dance style. How does he do it? As a technician, he is a great illusionist, a genuine mime. His ability to keep one leg straight as he glides while the other bends and seems to walk requires perfect timing.” Berry Gordy said of the performance, “from the first beat of Billie Jean, I was mesmerized, and when he did his iconic moonwalk, I was shocked, it was magic, Michael Jackson went into orbit, and never came down.”
1984–85: Pepsi, “We Are the World”, and business career

By the mid-1980s Jackson’s award-winning musical career contributed to his commercial appeal, which proved to be substantial. In November 1983 Jackson, along with his brothers, partnered with PepsiCo in a $5 million promotional deal that broke advertising industry records for a celebrity endorsement. The first Pepsi campaign, which ran in the United States from 1983 to 1984 and launched its “New Generation” theme, included advertising, tour sponsorship, public relations events, and in-store displays. Jackson, who was actively involved in creating the iconic Pepsi advertisement, suggested using his song, “Billie Jean”, as its musical jingle with a revised chorus. According a Billboard report in 2009, Brian J. Murphy, executive VP of branded management at TBA Global, commented, “You couldn’t separate the tour from the endorsement from the licensing of the music, and then the integration of the music into the Pepsi fabric.”

michael jackson

On January 27, 1984, Michael and other members of the Jacksons filmed a Pepsi Cola commercial that was overseen by executive Phil Dusenberry, a BBDO ad agency executive, and Alan Pottasch, Pepsi’s Worldwide Creative Director, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. In front of a full house of fans during a simulated concert, pyrotechnics accidentally set Jackson’s hair on fire, causing second-degree burns to his scalp. Jackson underwent treatment to hide the scars on his scalp, and had his third rhinoplasty shortly thereafter. Pepsi settled out of court, and Jackson donated his $1.5 million settlement to the Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, California. Its Michael Jackson Burn Center is named in his honor. Dusenberry later recounted the episode in his memoir, Then We Set His Hair on Fire: Insights and Accidents from a Hall of Fame Career in Advertising. Jackson signed a second agreement with Pepsi in the late 1980s for a reported $10 million. The second campaign had a global reach to more than twenty countries and provided financial support for Jackson’s Bad album and his world tour in 1987–88. Although Jackson had endorsements and advertising deals with other companies, such as L.A. Gear, Suzuki, and Sony, none were as significant as his deals with Pepsi, who later signed other music stars such as Britney Spears and Beyoncé to promote its products.
President Reagan wearing a suit and tie stands at a podium and turns to smile at Mrs Reagan, who is wearing a white outfit, and Jackson, who is wearing a white shirt with a blue jacket and a yellow strap across his chest.
Jackson at the White House being presented with an award by President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan, 1984

Jackson’s humanitarian work was recognized on May 14, 1984, when he was invited to the White House to receive an award from President Ronald Reagan for his support of charities that helped people overcome alcohol and drug abuse, and in recognition of his support for the Ad Council’s and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Drunk Driving Prevention campaign. Jackson donated the use of “Beat It” for the campaign’s public service announcements.

Unlike later albums, Thriller did not have an official tour to promote it, but the Victory Tour of 1984 headlined The Jacksons and showcased much of Jackson’s new solo material to more than two million Americans. It was the last tour he would do with his brothers. Following a controversy over the concert’s ticket sales, Jackson held a press conference and announced that he would donate his share of the proceeds from the Victory Tour, an estimated $3 to 5 million, to charity. Jackson’s charitable work and humanitarian awards continued with the release of “We Are the World” (1985), which he co-wrote with Lionel Richie. Released worldwide in March 1985 to aid the poor in the United States and Africa, the song earned $63 million for famine relief, and became one of the best-selling singles of all time, with nearly 20 million copies sold. “We Are the World” won four Grammys for 1985, including Song of the Year going to Jackson and Richie as its co-songwriters.Although the American Music Award directors removed the charity song from the competition because they felt it would be inappropriate, the AMA show in 1986 concluded with a tribute to the song in honor of its first anniversary. (The song was recorded on January 28, 1985). The project’s creators received two special AMA honors: one for the creation of the song and another for the USA for Africa idea. Jackson, Quincy Jones, and entertainment promoter Ken Kragan received special awards for their roles in creation of the song.

Jackson’s financial interests in the music publishing business expanded after collaborating with Paul McCartney in the early 1980s. He subsequently learned that McCartney made approximately $40 million a year from other people’s songs. By 1983 Jackson had begun investing in publishing rights to songs that others had written, but he was careful with his acquisitions, only bidding on a few of the dozens that were offered to him. Jackson’s early acquisitions of music catalogs and song copyrights such as the Sly Stone collection included “Everyday People” (1968), Len Barry’s “1–2–3” (1965), and Dion DiMucci’s “The Wanderer” (1961) and “Runaround Sue” (1961); however, Jackson’s most significant purchase came in 1985, when he acquired the publishing rights to ATV Music Publishing after months of negotiation. ATV had acquired the publishing rights to nearly 4000 songs, including the Northern Songs catalog that contained the majority of the Lennon–McCartney compositions recorded by The Beatles.

In 1984, Robert Holmes à Court, the wealthy Australian investor who owned ATV Music Publishing, announced he was putting the ATV catalog up for sale. In 1981, McCartney was offered the ATV music catalog for £20 million ($40 million). According to McCartney, he contacted Yoko Ono about making a joint purchase by splitting the cost at £10 million each, but Ono thought they could buy it for £5 million each. When they were unable to make a joint purchase, McCartney, who did not want to be the sole owner of the Beatles’ songs, did not pursue an offer on his own. According to a negotiator for Holmes à Court in the 1984 sale, “We had given Paul McCartney first right of refusal but Paul didn’t want it at that time.”

Jackson was first informed about the sale by his attorney, John Branca, in September 1984. An attorney for McCartney also assured Branca that McCartney was not interested in bidding. McCartney reportedly said “It’s too pricey”, but several other companies and investors were interested in bidding. Jackson submitted a bid of $46 million on November 20, 1984. His agents thought they had a deal several times, but encountered new bidders or new areas of debate. In May 1985, Jackson’s team walked away from talks after having spent more than $1 million and four months of due diligence work on the negotiations. In June 1985 Jackson and Branca learned that Charles Koppelman’s and Marty Bandier’s The Entertainment Company had made a tentative agreement with Holmes à Court to buy ATV Music for $50 million; however, in early August, Holmes à Court’s team contacted Jackson and talks resumed. Jackson raised his bid to $47.5 million, which was accepted because he could close the deal more quickly, having already completed due diligence of ATV Music. Jackson also agreed to visit Holmes à Court in Australia, where he would appear on the Channel Seven Perth Telethon. Jackson’s purchase of ATV Music was finalized on August 10, 1985.
1986–90: Appearance, tabloids, Bad, films, autobiography, and Neverland
See also: Michael Jackson’s health and appearance

Jackson’s skin had been a medium-brown color for the entire duration of his youth, but starting in the mid-1980s, it gradually grew paler. The change gained widespread media coverage, including rumors that he might be bleaching his skin. According to J. Randy Taraborrelli’s biography, in 1986, Jackson was diagnosed with vitiligo which Taroberrelli noted, may be a consequence of skin bleaching. Taraborelli claimed Jackson was diagnosed with lupus; the vitiligo partially lightened his skin, and the lupus was in remission; both illnesses made him sensitive to sunlight. The treatments he used for his condition further lightened his skin tone, and, with the application of pancake makeup to even out blotches, he could appear very pale. Jackson was also diagnosed with vitiligo in his autopsy though not with lupus.

New York plastic surgeon Dr. Pamela Lipkin, who has never treated Jackson or reviewed his medical records, said, “when you look at the other features, the skin bleaching sort of goes along with what I think was his quest for beauty, so I have to wonder what came first? Vitiligo or lighter skin?” Noting that Jackson had even skin tone when he was younger, Lipkin’s interpretation was that “probably he’s trying to look Caucasian: His skin is whiter. His nose is getting thinner every six months. His lips are getting thinner. His eyebrows are getting higher. His eyes are getting wider every time. His cheekbones are getting bigger.” Jackson claimed that he had only two rhinoplasties and no other surgery on his face, although at one point he mentioned having a dimple created in his chin. Jackson lost weight in the early 1980s because of a change in diet and a desire for “a dancer’s body”. Witnesses reported that he was often dizzy and speculated that he was suffering from anorexia nervosa; periods of weight loss would become a recurring problem later in life.

During the course of his treatment, Jackson made two close friends: his dermatologist, Dr. Arnold Klein, and Klein’s nurse Debbie Rowe. Rowe eventually became Jackson’s second wife and the mother of his two eldest children. He also relied heavily on Klein for medical and business advice.

Jackson became the subject of increasingly sensational reports. In 1986, the tabloids ran a story claiming that Jackson slept in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber to slow the aging process; he was pictured lying down in a glass box. Although the claim was untrue, according to tabloid reports that are widely cited, Jackson had disseminated the fabricated story himself. When Jackson bought a chimpanzee called Bubbles from a laboratory, he was reported to be increasingly detached from reality. It was reported that Jackson had offered to buy the bones of Joseph Merrick (the “elephant man”) and although untrue, Jackson did not deny the story. Although initially he saw these stories as opportunities for publicity, he stopped leaking untruths to the press as they became more sensational. Consequently the media began making up their own stories. These reports became embedded in the public consciousness, inspiring the nickname “Wacko Jacko”, which Jackson came to despise. Responding to the gossip, Jackson remarked to Taraborrelli:

Why not just tell people I’m an alien from Mars? Tell them I eat live chickens and do a voodoo dance at midnight. They’ll believe anything you say, because you’re a reporter. But if I, Michael Jackson, were to say, “I’m an alien from Mars and I eat live chickens and do a voodoo dance at midnight,” people would say, “Oh, man, that Michael Jackson is nuts. He’s cracked up. You can’t believe a single word that comes out of his mouth.”

A black jacket with five round golden medals on its left and right shoulders, a gold band on its left arm sleeve, and two belt straps on the right bottom sleeve. Underneath the jacket is a golden belt, with a round ornament in its center.
Jackson wore a gold-plated military style jacket with belt during the Bad era

Jackson collaborated with George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola on the 17-minute 3-D film Captain EO, which debuted in September 1986 at both the original Disneyland and at EPCOT in Florida, and in March 1987 at Tokyo Disneyland. The $30 million movie was a popular attraction at all three parks. A Captain EO attraction was later featured at Euro Disneyland after that park opened in 1992. All four parks’ Captain EO installations stayed open well into the 1990s: the Paris installation was the last one to close, in 1998. The attraction would later return to Disneyland in 2010 after Jackson’s death.

In 1987, Jackson disassociated himself from the Jehovah’s Witnesses, in response to their disapproval of the Thriller video. With the industry expecting another major hit, Jackson’s first album in five years, Bad (1987), was highly anticipated. It did not top Thriller as a commercial or artistic triumph, but Bad was still a substantial success in its own right.
Jackson performing in 1988

The Bad album spawned seven hit singles in the U.S., five of which (“I Just Can’t Stop Loving You”, “Bad”, “The Way You Make Me Feel”, “Man in the Mirror” and “Dirty Diana”) reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 charts. This was a record for most number one Hot 100 singles from any one album, including Thriller. Although the title track’s video was arguably derivative of the video for the earlier single “Beat It”, the “Bad” video still proved to be one of Jackson’s iconic moments. It was a gritty but colorful epic set against the backdrop of the New York City Subway system, with costuming and choreography inspired by West Side Story. As of 2012, the album sold between 30 to 45 million copies worldwide. Thanks to the Bad album, Bruce Swedien, and Humberto Gatica won one Grammy in 1988 for Best Engineered Recording – Non Classical and Michael Jackson won one Grammy for Best Music Video, Short Form for “Leave Me Alone” in 1989. In the same year, Jackson won an Award of Achievement at the American Music Awards because Bad is the first album ever to generate five number one singles in the U.S., the first album to top in 25 countries and the best-selling album worldwide in 1987 and in 1988. In 1988, “Bad” won an American Music Award for Favorite Soul R&B Single.

The Bad world tour began on September 12 that year, finishing on January 14, 1989. In Japan alone, the tour had 14 sellouts and drew 570,000 people, nearly tripling the previous record of 200,000 in a single tour. Jackson broke a Guinness World Record when 504,000 people attended seven sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium. He performed a total of 123 concerts to an audience of 4.4 million people. The Bad Tour turned out to be the last of Jackson’s concert tours to include shows in the continental United States, although later tours did make it to Hawaii.

In 1988, Jackson released his only autobiography, Moonwalk, which took four years to complete and sold 200,000 copies. Jackson wrote about his childhood, The Jackson 5, and the abuse he had suffered. He also wrote about his facial appearance, saying he had had two rhinoplastic surgeries and a dimple created in his chin. He attributed much of the change in the structure of his face to puberty, weight loss, a strict vegetarian diet, a change in hair style, and stage lighting. Moonwalk reached the top position on The New York Times best sellers’ list. The musician then released a film called Moonwalker, which featured live footage and short films that starred Jackson and Joe Pesci. The film was originally intended to be released to theaters, but due to financial issues, the film was released direct-to-video. It saw a theatrical release in Germany, though. It debuted atop the Billboard Top Music Video Cassette chart, staying there for 22 weeks. It was eventually knocked off the top spot by Michael Jackson: The Legend Continues.

In March 1988, Jackson purchased land near Santa Ynez, California, to build Neverland Ranch at a cost of $17 million. He installed several carnival rides on the 2,700-acre (11 km2) property including a Ferris wheel, a carousel and a menagerie, as well as a movie theater and a petting zoo. A security staff of 40 patrolled the grounds. In 2003, it was valued at approximately $100 million. In 1989, his annual earnings from album sales, endorsements, and concerts were estimated at $125 million for that year alone.[141] Shortly afterwards, he became the first Westerner to appear in a television ad in the Soviet Union.

His success resulted in him being dubbed the “King of Pop”. The nickname was popularized by Elizabeth Taylor when she presented him with the Soul Train Heritage Award in 1989, proclaiming him “the true king of pop, rock and soul.” President George H.W. Bush designated him the White House’s “Artist of the Decade”. From 1985 to 1990, he donated $455,000 to the United Negro College Fund, and all of the profits from his single “Man in the Mirror” went to charity. Jackson’s live rendition of “You Were There” at Sammy Davis, Jr.’s 60th birthday celebration allowed Jackson to receive his second Emmy nomination.
1991–93: Dangerous, Heal the World Foundation, and Super Bowl XXVII

In March 1991, Jackson renewed his contract with Sony for $65 million, a record-breaking deal at the time, displacing Neil Diamond’s renewal contract with Columbia Records. He released his eighth album, Dangerous, in 1991. The Dangerous album was co-produced with Teddy Riley, who convinced Michael to feature a rapper on his album for the first time. As of 2013, the album has shipped seven million copies in the U.S. and has sold approximately 30 million copies worldwide. In the United States, the album’s first single “Black or White” was its biggest hit, reaching number one on the Billboard Hot ;100 and remaining there for seven weeks, with similar chart performances worldwide. The album’s second single “Remember the Time” spent eight weeks in the top five in the United States, peaking at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. At the end of 1992, Dangerous was awarded the best-selling album of the year worldwide and “Black or White” was awarded best-selling single of the year worldwide at the Billboard Music Awards. Additionally, he won an award as best-selling artist of the 1980s.In 1993, Jackson performed the song at the Soul Train Music Awards in a chair, saying he had suffered an injury in rehearsals. In the UK and other parts of Europe, “Heal the World” was the biggest hit from the album; it sold 450,000 copies in the UK and spent five weeks at number two in 1992.

Jackson founded the Heal the World Foundation in 1992. The charity organization brought underprivileged children to Jackson’s ranch to enjoy theme park rides that Jackson had built on the property. The foundation also sent millions of dollars around the globe to help children threatened by war, poverty, and disease. In the same year Jackson published his second book, the bestselling collection of poetry, Dancing the Dream. While it was a commercial success and revealed a more intimate side to Jackson’s nature, the collection was mostly critically unacclaimed at the time of release. In 2009, the book was republished by Doubleday and was more positively received by some critics in the wake of Jackson’s untimely death. The Dangerous World Tour grossed $100 million. The tour began on June 27, 1992, and finished on November 11, 1993. Jackson performed to 3.5 million people in 70 concerts. He sold the broadcast rights to his Dangerous world tour to HBO for $20 million, a record-breaking deal that still stands.

michael jackson

Following the illness and death of Ryan White, Jackson helped draw public attention to HIV/AIDS, something that was still controversial at the time. He publicly pleaded with the Clinton Administration at Bill Clinton’s Inaugural Gala to give more money to HIV/AIDS charities and research. In a high-profile visit to Africa, Jackson visited several countries, among them Gabon and Egypt. His first stop to Gabon was greeted with a sizable and enthusiastic reception of more than 100,000 people, some of them carrying signs that read, “Welcome Home Michael.”In his trip to Côte d’Ivoire, Jackson was crowned “King Sani” by a tribal chief. He then thanked the dignitaries in French and English, signed official documents formalizing his kingship and sat on a golden throne while presiding over ceremonial dances.

In January 1993, Jackson made a memorable appearance at the halftime show at Super Bowl XXVII. Because of dwindling interest during halftime in the years before, the NFL decided to seek big-name talent that would keep viewers and ratings high, with Jackson being selected because of his popularity and universal appeal. It was the first Super Bowl where the audience figures increased during the half-time show to more than the game itself. The performance began with Jackson catapulting onto the stage as fireworks went off behind him. As he landed on the canvas, he maintained a motionless “clenched fist, standing statue stance”, dressed in a gold and black military outfit and sunglasses; he remained completely motionless for a minute and a half while the crowd cheered. He then slowly removed his sunglasses, threw them away and sang four songs: “Jam”, “Billie Jean”, “Black or White”, and “Heal the World”. Jackson’s Dangerous album rose 90 places up the album chart.

In February 1993, Jackson was given the “Living Legend Award” at the 35th Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. “Black or White” was Grammy-nominated for best vocal performance. “Jam” gained two nominations: Best R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song. The Dangerous album won a Grammy for Best Engineered – Non Classical, awarding the work of Bruce Swedien and Teddy Riley. In the same year, Michael Jackson won three American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Album (Dangerous), Favorite Soul/R&B Single (“Remember the Time”) and was the first to win the International Artist Award, for his global performances and humanitarian concerns. This award will bear his name in the future.
1993–94: First child sexual abuse allegations and first marriage
Main article: 1993 child sexual abuse accusations against Michael Jackson

Jackson gave a 90-minute interview to Oprah Winfrey on February 10, 1993, his second television interview since 1979. He grimaced when speaking of his childhood abuse at the hands of his father; he believed he had missed out on much of his childhood years, admitting that he often cried from loneliness. He denied tabloid rumors that he had bought the bones of the Elephant Man, slept in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, or bleached his skin, stating for the first time that he had vitiligo. Dangerous re-entered the album chart in the top 10, more than a year after its original release.

In the summer of 1993, Jackson was accused of child sexual abuse by a 13-year-old boy named Jordan Chandler and his father, Evan Chandler, a dentist. The Chandler family demanded payment from Jackson, and the singer initially refused. Jordan Chandler eventually told the police that Jackson had sexually abused him. Evan Chandler was tape-recorded discussing his intention to pursue charges, saying, “If I go through with this, I win big-time. There’s no way I lose. I will get everything I want and they will be destroyed forever….. Michael’s career will be over”. Jordan’s mother was, however, adamant at the time that there had been no wrongdoing on Jackson’s part. Jackson later used the recording to argue that he was the victim of a jealous father whose only goal was to extort money from the singer. In January 1994, however, after investigation on allegations of extortion against the singer by Chandler, deputy Los Angeles County district attorney Michael J. Montagna stated that Chandler would not be charged due to lack of cooperation from Jackson’s camp and its willingness to negotiate with Chandler for several weeks among other reasons.

In August 1993, Jackson’s home was raided by the police who, according to court documents, found books and photographs in his bedroom featuring young boys with little or no clothing. Since the books were legal to purchase and own, the jury decided to not indict Jackson. In December 1993, Jackson was strip searched. Jordan Chandler had reportedly given police a description of Jackson’s intimate parts, and the strip search revealed that Jordan had correctly claimed Jackson had patchy-colored buttocks, short pubic hair, and pink and brown marked testicles. Reportedly, Jordan had also previously drawn accurate pictures of a dark spot on Jackson’s penis only visible when his penis was lifted. Despite differing initial internal reports from prosecutors and investigators and later, with reports of jurors feeling otherwise that the photos did not match the description, the DA stated his belief in a sworn affidavit that the description was accurate, along with the sheriff’s photographer stating the description was accurate. A 2004 motion filed by Jackson’s defense asserted that Jackson was never criminally indicted by any grand jury and that his settlement admitted no wrongdoing and contained no evidence of criminal misconduct.

Jackson’s friends said he never recovered from the humiliation of the strip search. The investigation was inconclusive and no charges were ever filed. Jackson described the search in an emotional public statement, and proclaimed his innocence. On January 1, 1994, Jackson settled with the Chandlers out of court for $22 million. A Santa Barbara County grand jury and a Los Angeles County grand jury disbanded on May 2, 1994 without indicting Jackson, and the Chandlers stopped co-operating with the criminal investigation around July 6, 1994. The out-of-court settlement’s documentation specifically stated Jackson admitted no wrongdoing and no liability; the Chandlers and their family lawyer Larry Feldman signed it without contest. Feldman also explicitly stated “nobody bought anybody’s silence”. A decade after the fact, during the second round of child abuse allegations, Jackson’s lawyers would file a memo stating that the 1994 settlement was done without his consent. A later disclosure by the FBI of investigation documents compiled over nearly 20 years led to Jackson’s attorney to make the suggestion that there was no evidence of molestation or sexual impropriety from Jackson towards minors. According to reports the DCFS had investigated Jackson beginning in 1993 with the Chandler allegation and again in 2003. Reports show the LAPD and DCFS did not find credible evidence of abuse or sexual misconduct.

In May 1994, Jackson married Lisa Marie Presley, the daughter of Elvis and Priscilla Presley. They had first met in 1975, when a seven-year-old Presley attended one of Jackson’s family engagements at the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino, and were reconnected through a mutual friend. According to a friend of Presley’s, “their adult friendship began in November 1992 in L.A.” They stayed in contact every day over the telephone. As the child molestation accusations became public, Jackson became dependent on Presley for emotional support; she was concerned about his faltering health and addiction to drugs.[195] Presley explained, “I believed he didn’t do anything wrong and that he was wrongly accused and yes I started falling for him. I wanted to save him. I felt that I could do it.” She eventually persuaded him to settle the civil case out of court and go into rehabilitation to recover.

Jackson proposed to Presley over the telephone towards the fall of 1993, saying, “If I asked you to marry me, would you do it?” They married in the Dominican Republic in secrecy, denying it for nearly two months afterwards. The marriage was, in her words, “a married couple’s life….. that was sexually active”. At the time, the tabloid media speculated that the wedding was a ploy to prop up Jackson’s public image. The marriage lasted less than two years and ended with an amicable divorce settlement. In a 2010 interview with Oprah, Presley admitted that they spent four more years after the divorce “getting back together and breaking up”, until she decided to stop.

michael jackson

1995–99: HIStory, second marriage, and fatherhood.

In 1995, Jackson merged his ATV Music catalog with Sony’s music publishing division creating Sony/ATV Music Publishing. Jackson retained half-ownership of the company, earned $95 million upfront as well as the rights to even more songs. He then released the double album HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I. The first disc, HIStory Begins, was a 15-track greatest hits album, and was later reissued as Greatest Hits: HIStory, Volume I in 2001, while the second disc, HIStory Continues, contained 13 new songs and 2 cover versions. The album debuted at number one on the charts and has been certified for seven million shipments in the US. It is the best-selling multiple-disc album of all-time, with 20 million copies (40 million units) sold worldwide. HIStory received a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year.

The first single released from the album was “Scream/Childhood”. “Scream” was a duet, performed with Jackson’s youngest sister Janet. The song fights against the media, mainly for what the media made him out to be during his 1993 child abuse allegations. The single had the highest debut on the Billboard Hot 100 at number five, and received a Grammy nomination for “Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals”.”You Are Not Alone” was the second single released from HIStory; it holds the Guinness World Record for the first song ever to debut at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It was seen as a major artistic and commercial success, receiving a Grammy nomination for “Best Pop Vocal Performance”.
Close-up of a pale skinned Jackson with black hair. He is wearing a black jacket with white designs on it.
Michael Jackson at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival for the Ghosts music video premier

In late 1995, Jackson was rushed to a hospital after collapsing during rehearsals for a televised performance; the incident was caused by a stress-related panic attack. “Earth Song” was the third single released from HIStory, and topped the UK Singles Chart for six weeks over Christmas 1995; it sold a million copies, making it Jackson’s most successful single in the UK. The track “They Don’t Care About Us” became controversial when the Anti-Defamation League and other groups criticized its allegedly antisemitic lyrics. Jackson quickly put out a revised version of the song without the offending lyrics. In 1996, Jackson won a Grammy for Best Music Video, Short Form for “Scream” and an American Music Award for Favorite Pop/Rock Male Artist.

The album was promoted with the successful HIStory World Tour. The tour began on September 7, 1996, and finished on October 15, 1997. Jackson performed 82 concerts in 58 cities to over 4.5 million fans, and grossed a total of $165 million. The show, which visited five continents and 35 countries, became Jackson’s most successful in terms of audience figures.[130] During the tour, Jackson married his longtime friend Deborah Jeanne Rowe, a dermatology nurse, in an impromptu ceremony in Sydney, Australia. Rowe was approximately six months pregnant with the couple’s first child at the time. Originally, Rowe and Jackson had no plans to marry, but Jackson’s mother Katherine persuaded them to do so.[209] Michael Joseph Jackson Jr (commonly known as Prince) was born on February 13, 1997; his sister Paris-Michael Katherine Jackson was born a year later on April 3, 1998.[199][210] The couple divorced in 1999, and Jackson got full custody of the children. The divorce was relatively amicable, but a subsequent custody suit was not settled until 2006.[211][212]

In 1997, Jackson released Blood on the Dance Floor: HIStory in the Mix, which contained remixes of hit singles from HIStory and five new songs. Worldwide sales stand at 6 million copies, it is the best selling remix album ever released.[213] It reached number one in the UK, as did the title track.[213][214] In the US, the album was certified platinum, but only reached number 24.[152][205] Forbes placed his annual income at $35 million in 1996 and $20 million in 1997.[140] Throughout June 1999, Jackson was involved in a number of charitable events. He joined Luciano Pavarotti for a benefit concert in Modena, Italy. The show was in support of the nonprofit organization War Child, and raised a million dollars for the refugees of Kosovo, FR Yugoslavia, as well as additional funds for the children of Guatemala.[215] Later that month, Jackson organized a set of “Michael Jackson & Friends” benefit concerts in Germany and Korea. Other artists involved included Slash, The Scorpions, Boyz II Men, Luther Vandross, Mariah Carey, A. R. Rahman, Prabhu Deva Sundaram, Shobana, Andrea Bocelli, and Luciano Pavarotti. The proceeds went to the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund, the Red Cross and UNESCO.[216] From August 1999 through 2000, he lived in New York City at 4 East 74th Street.[217]
2000–03: Label dispute and Invincible

At the turn of the century, Jackson won an American Music Award as Artist of the 1980s. Throughout 2000 and 2001, Jackson worked in the studio with Teddy Riley and Rodney Jerkins, as well as other collaborators. These sessions would result in the album Invincible, released in October 2001. Invincible was Jackson’s first full-length album in six years, and it would be the last album of new material he released while still alive. The release of the album was preceded by a dispute between Jackson and his record label, Sony Music Entertainment. Jackson had expected the licenses to the masters of his albums to revert to him sometime in the early 2000s. Once he had the licenses, he would be able to promote the material however he pleased and keep all the profits. However, due to various clauses in the contract, the revert date turned out to be many years away. Jackson discovered that the attorney who represented him in the deal was also representing Sony. Jackson was also concerned about the fact that for a number of years, Sony had been pressuring him to sell his share in their music catalog venture. Jackson feared that Sony might have a conflict of interest, since if Jackson’s career failed, he would have to sell his share of the catalog at a low price. Jackson sought an early exit from his contract.

In September 2001, two 30th Anniversary concerts were held at Madison Square Garden to mark the singer’s 30th year as a solo artist. Jackson appeared onstage alongside his brothers for the first time since 1984. The show also featured performances by Mýa, Usher, Whitney Houston, NSYNC, Destiny’s Child, Monica, Luther Vandross, and Slash, among other artists. The second of the two shows took place the night before the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. After 9/11, Jackson helped organize the United We Stand: What More Can I Give benefit concert at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. The concert took place on October 21, 2001, and included performances from dozens of major artists, including Jackson, who performed his song “What More Can I Give” as the finale. Jackson’s solo performances were omitted from the televised version of the benefit concert, although he could still be seen singing background vocals. This omission happened because of contractual issues related to the earlier 30th Anniversary concerts: those concerts were boiled down into a two-hour TV special titled Michael Jackson: 30th Anniversary Celebration which debuted in November 2001.

In spite of the events preceding its release, Invincible came out in October 2001 to much anticipation. Invincible proved to be a hit, debuting atop the charts in 13 countries and going on to sell approximately 13 million copies worldwide. It received double-platinum certification in the U.S. However, the sales for Invincible were lower than those of his previous releases, due in part to a lack of promotion, no supporting world tour and the label dispute. The album also came out at a bad time for the music industry in general. The album cost $30 million to record, not including promotional expenditures. Invincible spawned three singles, “You Rock My World”, “Cry”, and “Butterflies”, the latter without a music video. Jackson alleged in July 2002 that Mottola was a “devil” and a “racist” who did not support his African-American artists, using them merely for his own personal gain. He charged that Mottola had called his colleague Irv Gotti a “fat nigger”. Sony refused to renew Jackson’s contract, and claimed that a $25 million promotional campaign had failed because Jackson refused to tour in the United States.

In 2002, Michael Jackson won his 22nd American Music Award for Artist of the Century. In the same year, Jackson’s third child, Prince Michael Jackson II (nicknamed “Blanket”) was born. The mother’s identity is unknown, but Jackson has said the child was the result of artificial insemination from a surrogate mother and his own sperm. On November 20 of that year, Jackson brought his infant son onto the balcony of his room at the Hotel Adlon in Berlin, as fans stood below, holding him in his right arm, with a cloth loosely draped over the baby’s face. The baby was briefly extended over a railing, four stories above ground level, causing widespread criticism in the media. Jackson later apologized for the incident, calling it “a terrible mistake”. Sony released Number Ones, a compilation of Jackson’s hits on CD and DVD. In the U.S., the album was certified triple platinum by the RIAA; in the UK it was certified six times platinum for shipments of at least 1.2 million units.
2003–05: Second child sexual abuse allegations and acquittal
Further information: Living with Michael Jackson and People v. Jackson
Jackson in Las Vegas, 2003

Beginning in May 2002, Jackson allowed a documentary film crew, led by British TV personality Martin Bashir, to follow him around just about everywhere he went. Bashir’s film crew was with Jackson during the “baby-dangling incident” in Berlin. The program was broadcast in March 2003 as Living with Michael Jackson, and painted an extraordinarily unflattering portrait of the singer.

In a particularly controversial scene, Jackson was seen holding hands and discussing sleeping arrangements with a young boy. As soon as the documentary aired, the Santa Barbara county attorney’s office began a criminal investigation. After an initial probe from the LAPD and DCFS was conducted in February 2003, they had initially concluded that molestation allegations were “unfounded” at the time. After the young boy involved in the documentary and his mother later told investigators that Jackson had been improper with the boy, Jackson was arrested in November 2003, and was charged with seven counts of child molestation and two counts of administering an intoxicating agent in relation to the 13-year old boy shown in the film. Jackson denied the allegations, saying the sleepovers were not sexual in nature. The People v. Jackson trial began on January 31, 2005, in Santa Maria, California, and lasted five months, until the end of May. On June 13, 2005, Jackson was acquitted on all counts. After the trial, in a highly publicized relocation he moved to the Persian Gulf island of Bahrain, as a guest of Sheikh Abdullah. Bahrain was also where the family intended to send Jackson if he was convicted (though Jackson did not know about the plan), according to a statement by Jermaine Jackson printed in The Times of London in September 2011.
2006–09: Closure of Neverland, final years, and This Is It
Jackson and his son Blanket in Disneyland Paris, 2006

In March 2006, the main house at the Neverland Ranch was closed as a cost-cutting measure. There were numerous reports around that time that Jackson was having financial problems. Jackson had been delinquent on his repayments of a $270 million loan secured against his music publishing holdings, even though those holdings were reportedly making him as much as $75 million a year. Bank of America sold the debt to Fortress Investments. Sony reportedly proposed a restructuring deal which would give them a future option to buy half of Jackson’s stake in their jointly owned publishing company (leaving Jackson with a 25% stake).[202] Jackson agreed to a Sony-backed refinancing deal in April 2006, although the exact details were not made public. Jackson did not have a recording contract in place with Sony or any other major record label at the time.

In early 2006, there was an announcement that Jackson had signed a contract with a Bahrain-based startup called Two Seas Records. However, nothing ever came of that deal, and the CEO of Two Seas, Guy Holmes, later stated that the deal had never been finalized.Throughout 2006, Sony repackaged 20 singles from the 1980s and 1990s as the Michael Jackson: Visionary series, which subsequently became a box set. Most of those singles returned to the charts as a result. In September 2006, Jackson and his ex-wife Debbie Rowe confirmed reports that they had settled their long-running child custody suit. The terms were never made public. Jackson continued to be the custodial parent of the couple’s two children. In October 2006, Fox News entertainment reporter Roger Friedman said that Jackson had been recording at a studio in rural Westmeath, Ireland. It was not known at the time what Jackson might be working on, or who might be paying for the sessions, since his publicist had recently issued a statement claiming that he had left Two Seas.

In November 2006, Jackson invited an Access Hollywood camera crew into the studio in Westmeath, and MSNBC broke the story that he was working on a new album, produced by will.i.am of The Black Eyed Peas. Jackson performed at the World Music Awards, in London on November 15, 2006, and accepted a Diamond Award for selling over 100 million records. Jackson returned to the United States after Christmas 2006 to attend James Brown’s funeral in Augusta, Georgia. He gave one of the eulogies, saying that “James Brown is my greatest inspiration.” In the spring of 2007, Jackson and Sony teamed up to buy yet another music publishing company: Famous Music LLC, formerly owned by Viacom. This deal gave him the rights to songs by Eminem, Shakira and Beck, among others. Jackson recorded extensively during this period in New York with songwriter and producer will.i.am and also in Las Vegas with producers Akon and RedOne. In March 2007, Jackson gave a brief interview to the Associated Press in Tokyo, where he said, “I’ve been in the entertainment industry since I was 6 years old, and as Charles Dickens would say, ‘It’s been the best of times, the worst of times.’ But I would not change my career….. While some have made deliberate attempts to hurt me, I take it in stride because I have a loving family, a strong faith and wonderful friends and fans who have, and continue, to support me.”

In March 2007, Jackson visited a U.S. Army post in Japan named Camp Zama to greet 3,000 plus U.S. troops and their families. The hosts presented Jackson with a Certificate of Appreciation for his devotion to U.S. Military troops and their families.

In September 2007, Jackson was reportedly still working with will.i.am, but the album was apparently never completed. However, in 2008, Jackson and Sony released Thriller 25 to mark the 25th anniversary of the original Thriller. This album featured the previously unreleased song “For All Time” (an outtake from the original sessions) as well as remixes, where Jackson collaborated with younger artists who had been inspired by his work. Two of the remixes were released as singles with only modest success: “The Girl Is Mine 2008” (with will.i.am) and “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’ 2008” (with Akon). The first single was based on an early demo version, without Paul McCartney. The album itself was a hit, however. In anticipation of Jackson’s 50th birthday, Sony BMG released a series of greatest-hits albums called King of Pop. Slightly different versions were released in various countries, based on polls of local fans. King of Pop reached the top 10 in most countries where it was issued, and also sold well as an import in other countries (such as the United States.)
An aerial view of part of Jackson’s 2,800-acre (11 km2) Neverland Valley Ranch near Los Olivos, CA showing the many rides

In late 2008, Fortress Investments threatened to foreclose on Neverland Ranch, which Jackson used as collateral for loans running into many tens of millions of dollars. However, Fortress opted to sell Jackson’s debts to Colony Capital LLC. In November, Jackson transferred Neverland Ranch’s title to Sycamore Valley Ranch Company LLC, which was a joint venture between Jackson and Colony Capital LLC. This deal cleared Jackson’s debt, and he reportedly even gained an extra $35 million from the venture. At the time of his death, Jackson still owned a stake in Neverland/Sycamore Valley, but it is unknown how large that stake was. In September 2008, Jackson entered negotiations with Julien’s Auction House to display and auction a large collection of memorabilia amounting to approximately 1,390 lots. The auction was scheduled to take place between April 22 and 25. An exhibition of the lots opened as scheduled on April 14, but the actual auction was eventually cancelled at Jackson’s request.

In March 2009, Jackson held a press conference at London’s O2 Arena and announced a series of comeback concerts titled This Is It. The shows would be Jackson’s first major series of concerts since the HIStory World Tour finished in 1997. Jackson suggested possible retirement after the shows; he said it would be his “final curtain call”. The initial plan was for 10 concerts in London, followed by shows in Paris, New York City and Mumbai. Randy Phillips, president and chief executive of AEG Live, stated that the first 10 dates alone would earn the singer approximately £50 million. The London residency was increased to 50 dates after record breaking ticket sales: over one million were sold in less than two hours. Jackson rehearsed in Los Angeles in the weeks leading up to the tour under the direction of choreographer Kenny Ortega. Most of these rehearsals took place at the Staples Center, which was owned by AEG. The concerts would have commenced on July 13, 2009, and finished on March 6, 2010. Less than three weeks before the first show was due to begin in London and with all concerts being sold out, Jackson died after suffering cardiac arrest. Some time before his death, it was widely stated that he was starting a clothing line with Christian Audigier; due to his death, the current status of the label remains unknown.

Jackson’s first posthumous song released entirely by his Estate was titled “This Is It” which Jackson cowrote in the 1980s with Paul Anka. It was not on the set lists for the concerts, and the recording was based on an old demo tape. The surviving brothers reunited in the studio for the first time since 1989 to record backing vocals. On October 28, 2009, a documentary film about the rehearsals titled Michael Jackson‘s This Is It was released. Even though it ran for a limited two-week engagement, it became the highest grossing documentary or concert movie of all time, with earnings of more than $260 million worldwide. Jackson’s estate received 90% of the profits. The film was accompanied by a compilation album of the same name. Two versions of the new song appear on the album, which also featured original masters of Jackson‘s hits in the order in which they appear in the movie, along with a bonus disc with previously unreleased versions of more Jackson hits as well as a spoken-word poem titled “Planet Earth”. At the 2009 American Music Awards Jackson won four posthumous awards, two for him and two for his album Number Ones, bringing his total American Music Awards to 26.
Death and memorial
Main articles: Death of Michael Jackson and Michael Jackson memorial service
Jackson’s Star with flowers and notes on it
Fans flocked to Jackson’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, adorning it with flowers and notes on the day of his death.

michael jackson

On June 25, 2009, Jackson died while in his bed at his rented mansion at 100 North Carolwood Drive in the Holmby Hills district of Los Angeles. Attempts at resuscitating him by Conrad Murray, his personal physician, were unsuccessful. Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics received a 911 call at 12:22 (PDT, 19:22 UTC), arriving three minutes later at Jackson’s location. He was reportedly not breathing and CPR was performed. Resuscitation efforts continued en route to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, and for more than an hour after arriving there at 1:13 (20:13 UTC). He was pronounced dead at 2:26 local time (21:26 UTC). Jackson’s death triggered a global outpouring of grief.

The news spread quickly online, causing websites to slow down and crash from user overload. Both TMZ and the Los Angeles Times suffered outages. Google initially believed that the input from millions of people searching for “Michael Jackson” meant that the search engine was under DDoS attack, and blocked searches related to Michael Jackson for 30 minutes. Twitter reported a crash, as did Wikipedia at 3:15 pm PDT (22:15 UTC). The Wikimedia Foundation reported nearly a million visitors to Jackson’s biography within one hour, probably the most visitors in a one-hour period to any article in Wikipedia’s history. AOL Instant Messenger collapsed for 40 minutes. AOL called it a “seminal moment in Internet history”, adding, “We’ve never seen anything like it in terms of scope or depth.”

Around 15% of Twitter posts—or 5,000 tweets per minute—reportedly mentioned Jackson after the news broke, compared to the 5% recalled as having mentioned the Iranian elections or the flu pandemic that had made headlines earlier in the year. Overall, web traffic ranged from 11% to at least 20% higher than normal. MTV and BET aired marathons of Jackson’s music videos. Jackson specials aired on multiple television stations around the world. The British soap opera EastEnders added a last-minute scene, in which one character tells another about the news, to the June 26 episode.

Jackson’s memorial was held on July 7, 2009, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, preceded by a private family service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park’s Hall of Liberty. Because of the high demand, organizers of the service fashioned a lottery style distribution method to give out tickets to members of the public. 1.6 million fans applied for tickets to the service over the two-day period that registration was open. 8,750 names were drawn at random to decide who to distribute tickets to, with each recipient receiving two tickets each. Jackson’s casket was present during the memorial but no information was released about the final disposition of the body. The memorial service was one of the most watched events in online streaming history. The U.S. audience was estimated by Nielsen to be 31.1 million, an amount comparable to the estimated 35.1 million that watched the 2004 burial of former president Ronald Reagan, and the estimated 33.1 million Americans who watched the 1997 funeral for Princess Diana.

Mariah Carey, Stevie Wonder, Lionel Richie, John Mayer, Jennifer Hudson, Usher, Jermaine Jackson, and Shaheen Jafargholi performed at the event. Berry Gordy and Smokey Robinson gave eulogies, while Queen Latifah read “We had him”, a poem written for the occasion by Maya Angelou. The Reverend Al Sharpton received a standing ovation with cheers when he told Jackson’s children, “Wasn’t nothing strange about your daddy. It was strange what your daddy had to deal with. But he dealt with it anyway.” The memorial is best remembered for when Jackson’s 11-year-old daughter, Paris Katherine, speaking publicly for the first time cried as she told the crowd, “Ever since I was born, Daddy has been the best father you could ever imagine….. I just wanted to say I love him….. so much.” Reverend Lucious Smith provided a closing prayer. On August 24, several news outlets quoted anonymous sources as stating that the Los Angeles coroner had decided to treat Jackson’s death as a homicide; this was later confirmed by the coroner on August 28. At the time of death, Jackson had been administered propofol, lorazepam and midazolam. Law enforcement officials conducted a manslaughter investigation of his personal physician Conrad Murray, who was charged with involuntary manslaughter by prosecutors in Los Angeles on February 8, 2010. Jackson’s body was entombed on September 3, 2009, at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.
Portrait and other tributes, including mural and messages from 650 Spanish fans, letters, pictures, teddy bears, and flowers.
Tribute of fans from all over the world in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park on the first anniversary of his death

On June 25, 2010, the first anniversary of Jackson’s death, fans traveled to Los Angeles to pay their tribute to him. They visited Jackson’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and his family’s home, as well as Forest Lawn Memorial Park. Many of the fans were carrying sunflowers and other tribute items to drop off at the sites. Members of the Jackson family and close friends arrived to pay their respects. Katherine returned to Gary, Indiana to unveil a granite monument constructed in the front yard of the family home. The memorial continued with a candlelight vigil and a special performance of “We Are the World”. On June 26, there was a protest march in front of the Los Angeles Police Department’s Robbery-Homicide Division at the old Parker Center building and a petition with thousands of signatures demanding justice was delivered. The Jackson Family Foundation in conjunction with Voiceplate presented “Forever Michael”, an event bringing together Jackson family members, celebrities, fans, supporters and the community to celebrate and honor his legacy. A portion of the proceeds were presented to some of Jackson’s favorite charities. Katherine also introduced her new book “Never Can Say Goodbye”.

Michael Jackson.

Lisa Lisa & Cult Jam;Full Force – I Wonder If I Take You Home

Lisa Lisa

(born Lisa Velez, January 15, 1966)Lisa Lisa and her band Cult Jam are an urban contemporary band and one of first freestyle music groups to emerge from New York City in the 1980s. Cult Jam consisted of guitarist/bassist Alex “Spanador” Moseley, and drummer and keyboardist Mike Hughes. They were assembled and produced by Full Force.

History:

Velez is of Puerto Rican descent and grew up in New York City and attended Julia Richman High School in Manhattan, NY. The group released their debut album Lisa Lisa & Cult Jam with Full Force in 1985. She was signed by Columbia Records and the label released their single “I Wonder If I Take You Home” to the European division of CBS Records for the compilation album Breakdancing. Stateside club DJs began playing the single from the import LP, and thus the U.S. division of CBS, Columbia Records, released the record. It quickly became a chart-topper on Billboard’s Hot Dance/Disco chart. It then crossed over to the R&B chart where it peaked at #6, and then to the pop chart, peaking at #34 in summer 1985. The single eventually went gold.

“I Wonder If I Take You Home” was followed by another club hit, “Can You Feel the Beat”, which also went to #40 on the R&B chart in late 1985. A sampling of the lyrics of this song would later be used by Nina Sky for their hit single “Move Ya Body” in 2004. Their third single, the ballad “All Cried Out”, also went gold, going to number #3 R&B and #8 pop in summer 1986. “All Cried Out” was later covered by Allure in 1997 and was a hit in 1998. Lisa Lisa & Cult Jam with Full Force went platinum.

lisa lisa

Their second album, Spanish Fly, was a huge success in 1987. It spawned two #1 pop hits, “Head to Toe” and “Lost in Emotion”, both of which went gold and both of which sported a retro Motown flavor mixed with the Freestyle sound they were known for. “Head to Toe” also parked at #1 R&B for two weeks and stayed in the pop top 5 nearly three months. Lost In Emotion’s video went on to become the 4th most played video of 1987 on MTV. Spanish Fly went platinum, peaking at #7 on the album chart. Other singles from the album were the ballad “Someone to Love Me for Me” b/w “Spanish Fly” (#7 R&B), “Everything Will B-Fine” (#9 R&B).

In between albums they recorded “Go For Yours,” which was featured in the movie Caddyshack II and is found on its soundtrack exclusively.

1989’s Straight to the Sky was a moderate hit that included the Top 30 pop -#3 R&B single, “Little Jackie Wants to Be a Star”, as well as the club hit “Just Git It Together”. Two decades later, their hit song would inspire the name of the group Little Jackie.

Their fourth and final album, Straight Outta Hell’s Kitchen, was less of a commercial success, though it did include a hit with “Let the Beat Hit ‘Em”, which reached the pop Top 40 and was a #1 hit on both the R&B and club charts. The group disbanded in 1991. Velez pursued both solo and acting careers, and Moseley and Hughes went on to do other projects.

Lisa Lisa released a solo album called LL77 in 1994, which included the moderate club hit “When I Fell In Love” (which was remixed by Junior Vasquez) and the notable single “Skip To My Lu”, which hit #38 on the R&B chart. She resurfaced circa 2001 on the Nickelodeon series Taina, in which she played the title character’s mother.

On June 24, 2008, Lisa Lisa presented an award at the BET Awards sparking interest that she may be plotting a comeback.

lisa lisa

In 2009, Lisa Lisa released Life ‘n Love, a full length album of new material on Mass Appeal Entertainment featuring the single “Can’t Wait” with guest rapper Pitbull. The album also features a cover version of the song “Stand” which was originally performed by Taylor Dayne on her 1998 album “Naked Without You”. The song “Que Locura” was also released as an iTunes single.Cult Jam & Full Force.

Vanity 6 – Nasty Girl (original 1982)

Vanity 6

Vanity 6,was a female vocal trio assembled by Prince in the early 1980s. They released one studio album, which blended the sounds of Pop, New wave, Dance, R&B and Funk.
Formation

In 1981, Prince, himself a rising musical star, suggested that his three female friends—his girlfriend Susan Moonsie, Boston native Brenda Bennett, and his personal assistant, Jamie Shoop form a girl group that would be called “The Hookers”. Prince’s vision was that the three women would perform in lingerie and sing sensual songs with lyrics about sex and fantasy. Prince had been wanting to mentor a girl singer or group since the late 70s when he saw the film A Star is Born with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson.

The original trio recorded a few demos before Prince met Denise Matthews, a nude model and Canadian B movie actress, in January 1982. Prince was so taken by Matthews’ charisma that he decided she would be the perfect frontwoman for his “Hookers” project. Around this time, Prince and Matthews began a romantic relationship. With Matthews’ arrival, Shoop was dropped from the group. Matthews was eventually re-christened Vanity. Prince had originally suggested that Matthews use the stage name “Vagina” (to be pronounced /vaginɑ/); she declined and renamed herself “Vanity” instead. Other versions of the story suggest that it was Prince himself who coined the name “Vanity”, as he said that looking at Matthews was like looking in a mirror at the female version of himself.

vanity 6Career:

With the new trio finalized, Prince renamed the group Vanity 6 (the number representing the group’s breast count). He provided the group, now dressed in lingerie and high heels, with provocative songs (although within the album credits, group members were sometimes given sole writing credits). Their first single, “He’s So Dull” did not do much on the charts, but did appear in the film National Lampoon’s Vacation. The second single “Nasty Girl” was a hit on both the U.S. R&B chart and U.S. Dance chart (where it hit number one), and it also made an appearance on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart. The song was featured in the film Beverly Hills Cop, although it was not included on the soundtrack. “Nasty Girl” was also featured in the 1983 sex-comedy Private School. Members of the group also provided backing vocals on Prince’s albums during their existence.
Dissension and dissolution

The third single, “Drive Me Wild”, was another minor hit. Music videos were shot for all three singles. Their self-titled album, Vanity 6 (which would turn out to be their only release) was eventually certified gold. The group opened up on the Triple Threat Tour, between 1982 and 1983, which also featured The Time and Prince, as the headliner. The fact that The Time played behind a curtain while Vanity 6 performed caused a rift between the bands and friction within those friendships.

To the other group members’ dismay, Prince chose Vanity to pose with him for a Richard Avedon photograph used on the cover of an issue of Rolling Stone magazine. The issue also contained a two-page Avedon photo of Vanity 6. In 1983, Vanity recorded a demo for a new song, “Sex Shooter”, and started reading for her lead role in Purple Rain opposite Prince. Prior to the shooting of the movie, later in 1983, Vanity abruptly decided to leave the Prince camp and relinquish her role in the film. Many reasons were given for her sudden departure, including money, the end of their romantic relationship, and, most importantly, Vanity having been offered a lucrative solo deal from Motown Records.
Apollonia 6

Vanity was replaced in Purple Rain by Patricia Kotero, who would later use the stage name Apollonia. She also inherited the lead role in Vanity 6, which was renamed Apollonia 6, alongside Bennett and Moonsie. The new trio also recorded what would be their only album, Apollonia 6 in 1984.
Personal Life

In the years since the group’s breakup, Vanity renounced her stage name and music and became a born again Christian.

Vanity 6.